Alternate Electoral Maps II

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Aaaaasima, May 22, 2017.

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  1. Calthrina950 Well-Known Member

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    If this had actually happened, then I would guess that West Virginia would be a Republican pickup in the general election. And also, how did you calculate these results?
     
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  2. Zyxoriv Jack of all trades, master of none.

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    How did you not win Vermont and yet win New Hampshire, interesting game of PI though.
     
  3. Zyxoriv Jack of all trades, master of none.

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    What state do you plan on covering next?

    i hope it's columbia
     
  4. MoralisticCommunist Banned

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    Well I may get a chance to work on Columbia soon, but for now the next state I have made on one the completely opposite side of America, Louisiana.

    The Seventh Party System: Part XXXXIV
    Map of the United States
    Part I - Metropotamia
    Part II - Alta California
    Part III - North Carolina
    Part IV - New Jersey
    Part V - Adams
    Part VI - Alabama
    Part VII - Rhode Island
    Part VIII - Sequoyah
    Part IX - Assenisipia
    Part X - East Florida
    Part XI - Tennessee
    Part XII - Kansas
    Part XIII - Dakota
    Part XIV - Arizona
    Part XV - Delaware
    Part XVI - Oregon
    Part XVII - Ozark
    Part XVIII - New Hampshire
    Part XIX - Western Connecticut
    Part XX - New York
    Part XXI - Santo Domingo
    Part XXII - South Carolina
    Part XXIII - Baja California
    Part XXIV - Chersonesus
    Part XXV - Canal Zone Territory
    Part XXVI - West Florida
    Part XXVII - Missouri
    Part XXVIII - Colorado
    Part XXIX - Trinidad and Tobago
    Part XXX - Pennsylvania
    Part XXXI - Wisconsin
    Part XXXII - Lincoln
    Part XXXIII - Deseret
    Part XXXIV - Platte
    Part XXXV - Kiribati
    Part XXXVI - New Mexico
    Part XXXVII - Maine
    Part XXXVIII - Alaska
    Part XXXIX - Hamilton
    Part XXXX - Mississippi
    Part XXXXI - North Virginia
    Part XXXXII - Bioko
    Part XXXXIII - Hawaii


    Louisiana is a very unique Southern state, and while it is often characterized as a Deep South state it's politics are unlike those of Lincoln, Alabama, Yazoo, or even Georgia.

    The main reason for this is the existence of the Parti Cadien, which is an ethnic party for the Cajun people of Southern Louisiana who originally descended from the Acadians who were expelled from the Maritime region during the Seven Years' War. While these people had kept their vibrant culture and religion alive for centuries after the expulsion, their language had slowly begun to die off after the US acquired the territory of Louisiana in the early 1800s. Politically, the Cajuns had become more and more engulfed into the Democratic party despite their differing religion and appeared to have become assimilated into the Anglo majority of the state.

    Then everything changed when Felix Herbert came into power. A Cajun himself, he rose to fame as a journalist who fought against Huey Long's despotic practices, making himself so well known that he eventually became governor of Louisiana himself in the 1950s. In this position of power he then raised Cajun awareness to a level never felt before the 1800s by adding French as the second official language in the state of Louisiana. With all government documents now being required to be made in both French and English, the incentive of the Cajun people to learn English had faded away and they instead became empowered to start asserting their own culture more strongly than ever before.

    Yet when Earl Long managed to seize the governorship from Herbert by railing against the bilingual status of Louisiana as too costly and unpatriotic Herbert decided to do the unthinkable and launch an opposition party against the Democrats, the Parti Cadien. While this party would never be able to win the seats needed for a majority due to the minority status of the Cajuns, they would soon become a thorn in the Longites side, often allying themselves with more free market friendly Democrats in order to push their agenda against the welfarist Longites.

    However it would not be until the 1982 when this party would finally be able to come into power by combining with Labor and the newly enfranchised Black Baptist Bloc to oust the Democrats for the first time since Reconstruction. This alliance would reinstate the bilingual status of Louisiana, once again allowing Cajun culture to thrive much to the dismay of deeply patriotic Democrats. At the same time, this alliance was also torn by the free market nature of the Parti Cadien and the explicitly left wing nature of Labor, divisions which eventually lead the alliance to collapse in on itself.

    Ever since then the Louisiana party system has been one of four parties, Parti Cadien, the Democrats, the Black Baptist Bloc, and Labor. On some years, Labor surges high enough to rule with the Black Baptist Bloc, other times they must rely on a grand coalition which includes the PC. And other times the Democrats ally themselves with Labor so as to ensure the Parti stays out of government, while other times the Democrats decide to ally with the Parti themselves. These inner party rivalries has lead to Louisiana have an extremely unstable party system, with governments often losing votes of confidence which require another election to take place.

    This year would feature Labor making a slight comeback against the Democrats, managing to gain ground on them against the massive loss which they suffered in the 2016 election. However their gains would prove to not be sufficient enough to break the majority of the Democrats and Parti Cadien, who barely held on to power with 83 seats out of a total of 165. Of course, given the inherent tensions which exist between the pro welfare Longites and the pro free market Parti Cadien the threat of rebellious politicians looms over both parties and many believe that their one seat majority will not be enough to survive all the way to 2019. But for the meantime it appears as though the Democrats have once again managed to keep control over the state of Louisiana, though it may soon flip back in Labor's favor, as the state had been back in the early 2010s.

    Government:
    Democrats - The party of southern social conservative and economic left wingers, the Longite faction has long dominated this section of the Democratic party ever since Earl Long expelled all the Herbert loyalists. While the party despises the multiracial Labor party for their support of civil rights they equally despise the Parti Cadien's dedication to free market reforms and as such have often allied themselves with Labor so as to pass their economically progressive agenda. However in this year's election, as in the 2016 election, Labor did not receive enough votes to set them over the threshold needed to form a majority government with the Democrats, and thus the Democratic party has opted to continue their makeshift alliance with the Parti Cadien for another two years, provided that no diehard Longites or conservative PC members decide to vote against the government.
    Parti Cadien - A Francophone party founded by Felix Herbert in 1956, their goal is to not only protect the cultural identity of the Cajun people but also to promote free market reforms which are good for business. The party is also not in favor of civil rights, with many party elites showing thinly veiled racism towards African Americans the vast majority of Creoles of color have since moved to Labor's camp. Yet at the same time, the party will occasionally make grand alliances with the Black Baptist Bloc and Labor just in order to keep the Democrats out of power.

    Opposition:
    Black Baptist Bloc - The main party for African Americans in the south, the strength of Labor in cities such as Baton Rouge and New Orleans has left them smaller than the state's demographics might otherwise suggest, with only the rural and more conservative blacks voting BBB. Yet they still remain the second largest party in the state and remain a formidably foe to the Democrats through their alliances with Labor and occasionally the Parti Cadien.
    Labor - A coalition party of urban blacks, left leaning whites, and Hispanics they ebb and flow from either the third or fourth largest party depending on the moods of the white and black populace towards Labor as opposed to the Black Baptist Bloc and Democrats. And despite having only three true strongholds in the state, at New Orleans, Baton Rouge, and Shreveport, they remain a key player in Louisiana politics and tend to be part of government more often than not.
    Constitution - A far right party of Christian conservatives they represent the interests of the state's diehard Protestants and wealthy whites who praise prosperity gospel. Due to their hatred of pretty much every party in Louisiana, from the "papist" Parti Cadien and the "rioting" Black Baptist Bloc to the "communist" Labor and Democrats, they have never been a part of any Louisiana government as of yet. But with the party gaining more and more voters from the Democratic base every year the time may soon come where they may transform Louisiana from a four party system into a five party one.
    Black Panther Party - A socialist and black nationalist party which protests police brutality and the hypocrisy of both the Labor party and the Black Baptist Bloc, they have slowly gained supporters in the big cities of New Orleans and Baton Rouge. And while they are unlikely to become a big player anytime soon, their growth has certainly hurt the position of both Labor and the BBB and forced them to deal with a new left wing opposition.

    [​IMG]

    Credit for the basemap goes to Chicxulub.
     
  5. Turquoise Blue Blossoming Tibby!

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    Was actually anticipating this, and it turned out brilliant.

    What is the status of the French language those days? Is it "Democrats would want to repeal bilingualism, but Labor and BBB has taken it as settled so there's no way they can ever repeal it unless they get a majority" thing?
     
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  6. kyc0705 Well-Known Member

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    And yet an absentee performance still returned stronger results than many of Reagan's real-life challengers.
     
  7. DPKdebator Hmm...

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    12:33 A.M. E.S.T.

    Gomez: Welcome back to Election Night, America. It is now 12:33 A.M. in the East, and we have several calls in New England to make:


    MASSACHUSETTS - 90% reporting
    Manchin/Klobuchar: 1,512,992 (50.18%)
    Baker/Sandoval: 1,470,952 (48.78%)
    Others: 31,445 (1.04%)

    Gomez: A stinging defeat for the Baker campaign, the Bay State can be called for Senator Manchin. Massachusetts has been ancestrally Democratic for nearly a century, a trend that started when Catholic Democrat Al Smith flipped the state in 1928 amid Herbert Hoover's national landslide. Despite being the state's popular Republican governor, it appears Charlie Baker has not been able to overcome the state's strong Democratic lean at the federal level. Manchin's lead is currently small, but it appears that most of the precincts that have yet to report are in the most Democratic parts of the state.


    RHODE ISLAND - 91% reporting
    Manchin/Klobuchar: 211,196 (50.64%)
    Baker/Sandoval: 201,819 (48.39%)
    Others: 4,020 (.96%)

    Gomez: Rhode Island is like Massachusetts' political twin in many ways, turning Democratic for the same reasons its neighbor did. In 2016 Donald Trump broke the two states' "twinning" trend when Rhode Island voted 12% to the right of Massachusetts. This did not translate into a victory for Baker, as the Ocean State appears to have "returned to form" relative to Massachusetts, which also voted for Manchin by a narrow margin.


    CONNECTICUT - 87% reporting
    Baker/Sandoval: 762,094 (53.11%)
    Manchin/Klobuchar: 658,741 (45.91%)
    Others: 14,100 (.98%)

    Gomez: However, we can project that Connecticut has flipped to the Baker column. The Constitution State is somewhat more ancestrally Republican than the other two southern states of New England, which means that the regional favorite son effect has allowed Baker to clinch a victory here.

    [​IMG]

    Gomez: Baker is currently up five electoral votes, 215-210, with 113 unprojected.



    12:46 A.M. E.S.T.

    Gomez: Just breaking now, we have two projections to make:

    VIRGINIA - 98% reporting
    Manchin/Klobuchar: 1,951,601 (49.69%)
    Baker/Sandoval: 1,936,844 (49.31%)
    Others: 39,462 (1.00%)

    Gomez: The Old Dominion can be called for Senator Manchin. Once a solidly Republican state, Virginia flipped to the Democrats in 2008 and hasn't voted for Democrats at the presidential level since. This trend was caused by explosive population growth in the increasingly liberal Northern Virginia, and it seems that Baker's social liberalism didn't flip enough NOVA voters in tandem with Manchin's appeal to voters in the western Appalachian regions of the state. The closeness of the result means that Baker will likely request a recount if the winner of the election is uncertain.


    LOUISIANA - 72% reporting
    Baker/Sandoval: 769,400 (52.40%)
    Manchin/Klobuchar: 684,223 (46.60%)
    Others: 14,690 (1.00%)

    Gomez: The Pelican State can be called for Governor Baker. Louisiana last voted Democratic in 1996 for Bill Clinton, and has become a solidly Republican state in the 21st century besides its moderate Democratic governor John Bel Edwards. Manchin made a few campaign stops here, but didn't seriously contest the state.

    [​IMG]

    Gomez: Both candidates are now tied with 223 electoral votes each, with 92 uncalled. It appears that, as widely predicted, the election's all coming down to the Midwest. Even if either candidate swept every uncalled state outside the Midwest, at least one Midwestern state needs to be won if Governor Baker or Senator Manchin want to become president.
     
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  8. AustralianSwingVoter Well-Known Member

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    Could I request Saratoga or Illinois?
     
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  9. historyrant Bigoted theocract

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    upload_2018-5-13_7-3-9.png In an alternate 2000 election with a stunning economy, the experienced Texas Governor, George W. Bush renowned for his competence crushes Bernie Sanders, an out of touch "radical socialist" congressman perceived to have dangerous ideas.
     
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  10. historyrant Bigoted theocract

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    Come on Baker for the sake of the Progressive cause give us a win.
     
  11. Turquoise Blue Blossoming Tibby!

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    "Progressive".
    Charlie Baker.
     
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  12. President Earl Warren Well-Known Member

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    Let's go Manchin, I really do think more of the South would be voting for him, so yeah please give us Missouri, Arkansas.
     
  13. MoralisticCommunist Banned

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    Pretty much, most Democrats would prefer to just have all of Louisiana speaking the "American" language but it has become a lost cause since Labor wants to keep their Creole of color voters and the Black Baptist Bloc doesn't care enough to want to expend the political capital which would be needed to upend the state's bilingual status now.

    Yeah sure, I forgot that I haven't done a Midwestern state in awhile so I'll make sure to put that in the queue.
     
  14. historyrant Bigoted theocract

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    I've decided Charlie Baker is the lesser of two evils. For one Baker actually accepts that climate change is a threat to society, unlike Manchin who wants us to burn coal for eternity.
     
  15. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    I was working on a county map for 1968 with all of Humphrey's votes removed, but I quickly realized that Nixon gets 80-90% almost everywhere outside the South, which makes for a boring map. so instead of the entire country, I just did the South, which is the only region where Wallace even wins any counties. Wallace wins MS, AL, LA, GA, and Arkansas while Nixon narrowly wins North Carolina and Tennessee and sweeps the remaining Southern states, likely doing much better in West Virginia than even Trump did. Nixon puts up a decent fight in Arkansas (Wallace +8) and Georgia (Wallace +12) but gets creamed and fails to win a single county in any of Louisiana, Mississippi, and Alabama.

    [​IMG]
     
  16. Wolfram Fair to middlin'

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    God dang, that’s an aesthetically pleasing map. Just... those deep blues in Georgialassippiana, lightening towards the edges, that big swathe of the Outer Banks, and then those light reds in Texas and the remaining Carolinas, deepening further out... it just looks really nice to me.
     
  17. Wendell Wendell

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    Lost in what might have been
    What does Maryland look like?
     
  18. Osk Eu set di la Oskaña

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    The 1934 Federalist Party Primaries were a contentious, competitive affair. With such a large field of candidates hoping to become outgoing President Butler's successor, the early states were won by two candidates in particular (Secretary Lee and Speaker De Priest), creating a mass drop off in potential candidates. Despite this, the Speaker's own Majority Whip, Bert Snell, refused to drop out. In the June primaries, Snell would win three states, and his similar positions to the Speaker (and foreign policy disagreements with Secretary Lee) led to no candidate winning the required number of delegates to secure the nomination. Despite this being the first year the Party had held primaries in every state, the nominee would be chosen at the convention.

    Secretary Lee, who is the youngest Secretary of State in the nations history, has become a young favorite in the Party after leading Butler's State Department. With the United States having joined PACO (Pan-American Cooperative Organization) and become a leading member, Lee has been credited with the resurgence of US global trade and dominance in the region. The early June news of civil war in the obscure South American nation of Tawantinsuyu, one of the largest economies in the Americas, gave Lee the boost to regain a slight delegate lead going into the Meeting of American Federalists (what the Federalist Party has called it's conventions since the late 18th Century) that July. Still, his lead over De Priest stands at just 5 delegates.

    Brooke Lee won 23 states, Oscar De Priest won 19, and Bert Snell won 4.

    It is now up to the delegates at the convention to decide who will get the prestigious honor of succeeding the great and magnanimous Nicholas Butler. The person to be nominated by the Party is almost surely the country's next President, and all three men left standing would do anything for such an honor.

    Federalists.png
    E. Brooke Lee - 881
    Oscar S. De Priest - 876
    Bertrand H. Snell - 170
     
  19. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    Nixon wins every county, all with >60% or better I believe.
     
  20. nofynofie Well-Known Member

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    Booker vs Shapiro

    Booker_Shapiro.png
     
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