Alternate Electoral Maps II

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Aaaaasima, May 22, 2017.

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  1. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    It is indeed. can you guess what it's a referendum on? green is yes and purple is no.
     
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  2. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    The new deal?
     
  3. Zachary VIII Russian bot

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    I don't think so. Nebraska and Kansas.
     
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  4. Rosa Luxemburg Homosatanist

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    Also Alaska and Hawaii
     
  5. Zachary VIII Russian bot

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    True. So it's after 1960. The east-west divide is interesting. The south and north both voted "yes", so it's not based around a social issue like Roe v Wade or civil rights.
     
  6. GermanDjinn did you commit crimes?? CALL THIS NUMBER!

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    NAFTA?
     
  7. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    Yes, it's a referendum on withdrawing from NAFTA. that's not to say that I think there would be such a lopsided result in favor of withdrawing if this referendum was actually held though, I just made it for fun.
     
  8. LoganZombieOfTime Member

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    1997 and 2001 have the same map, so I am skipping back to 1992

    UK General Election, 1992 using the Electoral College (127 total, 64 needed to win)
    [​IMG]
    John Major (Conservative) - 14,093,007 (41.9%) - 69 EVs
    Neil Kinnock (Labour) - 11,560,484 (34.4%) - 45 EVs
    James Molyneaux (UUP) - 271,049 (0.8%) - 3 EVs
     
    Last edited: Jul 6, 2018
  9. King_Arthur The Once and Present King

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    What website do you use?
     
  10. LoganZombieOfTime Member

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  11. LoganZombieOfTime Member

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    1987 and 1992 have the same map, so here is 1983.

    UK General Election, 1983 using the Electoral College (127 total, 64 needed to win)

    [​IMG]
    Margaret Thatcher (Conservative) - 13,012,316 (42.4%) - 96 EVs
    Michael Foot (Labour) - 8,456,934 (27.6%) - 28 EVs
    James Molyneaux (UUP) - 259,952 (0.8%) - 3 EVs
     
  12. Calthrina950 Well-Known Member

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    I wonder what the county map would look like here. I think Sarsour would win fewer counties than George McGovern.
     
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  13. Wendell Wendell

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    There were indeed West Coast Republicans gaining prominence in these areas, but we're talking about an era in which Ohio was still viewed by many as frontier, even if it by then had been a state longer than most people then living existed.
    Maybe, but things are starting to change by then. Anyway, I think in this era, be it Johnson or someone else, the clearest path to the presidency is elevation from the vice presidency. Remember, it was World War I before we had a CAlifornian nominatd for president by either party.
    Of course, many voters in both parties believe the other nominated Satan in 2016, thus characterizing this polarization. I also think that a Sandoval versus Sarsour would see a third party ticket hat would further help to cement Sandoval's win.
    This would be interesting. Would areas with large concentrations of American Muslims go her way, or would they be turned off by her candidacy?
     
  14. leecannon_ If I'm not posting I don't have serive/power/both.

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    Actually the first time a major party nominated a califronian was John C Fremont as the republicans nominee in 1856
     
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  15. Wendell Wendell

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    I was thinking he had moved back east at that point.
     
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  16. leecannon_ If I'm not posting I don't have serive/power/both.

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    As far as i can tell he still lived out that way, going on expeditions and such
     
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  17. Wendell Wendell

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    You're probably right.
     
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  18. Tex Arkana Spice for President!

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    I don't see much room for a left-wing third party if Sarsour was the Democratic nominee. I think the party is clearly going in a progressive direction so a truly leftist nominee wouldn't be as much of an issue as, say, Joe Manchin being the nominee.
     
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  19. Wendell Wendell

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    I agree, except that there's the concern, fair or not, that Sarsour's brand of progressivism is antisemitic. So, there might b another ticket helmed by or including a Jewish Democrat,
     
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  20. MoralisticCommunist Banned

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    The Seventh Party System: Part XXXXVII
    Map of the United States
    Part I - Metropotamia
    Part II - Alta California
    Part III - North Carolina
    Part IV - New Jersey
    Part V - Adams
    Part VI - Alabama
    Part VII - Rhode Island
    Part VIII - Sequoyah
    Part IX - Assenisipia
    Part X - East Florida
    Part XI - Tennessee
    Part XII - Kansas
    Part XIII - Dakota
    Part XIV - Arizona
    Part XV - Delaware
    Part XVI - Oregon
    Part XVII - Ozark
    Part XVIII - New Hampshire
    Part XIX - Western Connecticut
    Part XX - New York
    Part XXI - Santo Domingo
    Part XXII - South Carolina
    Part XXIII - Baja California
    Part XXIV - Chersonesus
    Part XXV - Canal Zone Territory
    Part XXVI - West Florida
    Part XXVII - Missouri
    Part XXVIII - Colorado
    Part XXIX - Trinidad and Tobago
    Part XXX - Pennsylvania
    Part XXXI - Wisconsin
    Part XXXII - Lincoln
    Part XXXIII - Deseret
    Part XXXIV - Platte
    Part XXXV - Kiribati
    Part XXXVI - New Mexico
    Part XXXVII - Maine
    Part XXXVIII - Alaska
    Part XXXIX - Hamilton
    Part XXXX - Mississippi
    Part XXXXI - North Virginia
    Part XXXXII - Bioko
    Part XXXXIII - Hawaii
    Part XXXXIV - Louisiana
    Part XXXXV - Seward
    Part XXXXVI - Illinoia


    Despite being located geographically in what many would call the Deep South, the politics of the state of Georgia are nothing like those of its neighbors, not even similar to the politics of Florida. The political system of Georgia is one which involves many competing interests and parties which make for tense and heated elections.

    One of the most unique political parties of Georgia is its branch of the Populist party. While Populist parties were once relatively common in the South during the late 1800s and early 1900s, ever since the rise of the National Union party, and then more recently the Conservative Revolution, such parties were practically nonexistent in the south. However, in 1976 one man James Carter decided to split from the Democratic party and form the Georgian Populist party to better represent farmers who he felt were being ignored by the Wallacite establishment. He also managed to connect both white and black farmers together on the common issue of environmentalism which threatened all farmers, be their owners black or white. Seeing the similarities which the rural Populists and the urban Labor party held in terms of both preaching unity among the races Carter famously announced a non-competition pact between their two parties in 1982, a full decade before the national Labor and Populist parties would reach such an agreement.

    Thanks to this non-competition pact between Labor and the Populists, it soon became possible to challenge the hegemony of the Democratic party, especially as the growth of Atlanta lead to more and more Democrats switching over to Labor. The growth of Atlanta also attracted many Northern transplants to settle in its suburbs, bringing with them their Dewey Republican ideology much like what had happened in Florida. In recent years, however, the Republican party of Georgia has become more and more influenced by Buckley Republicans, though the two have switched back and forth multiple times.

    Georgia has also become a popular destination for many immigrants, with Hispanics now making up 10.9% of the population while Asians make up 3.2%. Both of these minorities however are still dwarfed by Georgia largest, and oldest minority, the African-American population which totals in at 30.5% of the population. Due to the presence of both Labor and the Populists the Black Baptist Bloc is not as large of a political force as the racial numbers might suggest, however they still represent a significant force in Georgian politics.

    The lead up to the 2018 election can not be covered without mentioning the 2016 election. In this election, the ruling Labor-Populist coalition, holding on by a majority of just a few seats, was absolutely crushed by a massive swing to the Democratic party, leaving the Populist party with only 4 seats and Labor with 49. While the Democrats still did not have enough seats to rule by themselves, with the help of the Republicans and Constitutionists they could hold a solid majority which enabled the passage of many right wing reforms.

    The 2018 election, on the other hand, resulted in modest gains for the both Labor and the Populists, although never of them managed to return to anything close to the number of seats they once held prior to 2016. As a result, a coalition needed to be formed with other political blocs. However with the Black Baptist Bloc holding a grudge against the Populists and Labor for being secular socialist scum finding a coalition which could hold a majority would prove to be near impossible. As such, an unorthodox plan was made, to reach out to the Dewey Republicans and appeal to have them make the Republicans supply confidence to the Labor government. These Buckley Republicans were very unhappy being under the Democratic party in 2016, and at times threatened to bring the government down in order to prevent the Democrats attempts to repeal gay couples' right to a civil union, or their attempt to restrict the number of available abortion clinics. Of course, the Buckley Republicans would not go down without a fight, arguing that a right wing government might still be salvageable, even though it would require convincing Hispanos Unidos to join a coalition which also included the vehemently anti-immigration Constitution party.

    In the end, the intra-party struggle ended up creating a split in the party, as while a majority of the Republican membership consisted of Buckley Republicans, the majority of sitting representatives where Dewey Republicans. This lead to a mass revolt on the part of the Dewey Republicans, who went against the party's own base with the claim that Democrats and Constitution especially were tainting the GOP's values far too much, and that a new centrist course was need for the party to survive.

    As such, the governing coalition from 2018 to 2020 now consists of a hodgepodge of various left wing, centrist, and right wing parties, a coalition which the Buckley Republicans hope will fail sooner rather than later.

    Government:
    Labor - The largest party in Georgia following the 2018 election, they represent the interests of urban workers, be they black, white, Hispanic, or maybe even Asian. The party's stronghold remains in the Greater Atlanta area, with the black counties of Clayton and DeKalb being especially strong Labor areas which the left holds with an iron grip. The party has been in a non-competition pact with the Populists ever since 1982, and as such does not run in a few of the more rural constituencies such as Oconee, Central, and Coastal.
    Hispanos Unidos - The party for centrist Hispanics across most of America, they have managed to form a sizeable block among the Hispanic communities of Atlanta's suburbs. While the party has worked with both the Democrats and Labor in the past, they tend to prefer working with Labor as the Democrats often have questionable views on immigration, and the far right Constitution party has openly called for an end to all immigration from Latin American countries, making HU steadfast in their determination to never cooperate with a government coalition that includes the Constitutionists.
    Populists - The party of farmers and rural left wingers, James Carter has managed to make carve out its own niche by appealing to blacks and whites who are tired of the large racial divide in Georgia and who are also tried of the climate change denying ways of both the Black Baptist Bloc and the Democrats. While they are still a far cry from the dozens of seats the party once held in the glory days of the 1990s the party continues to be a faithful ally of Labor to this day with James Carter as its eternal leader.

    Supply:
    Dewey Republicans - The socially liberal wing of the Republican party which also does entirely hate welfare, they often protested against the far right direction which Georgia was starting to head towards under the Dem-Rep-Con coalition of 2016-2018. Now having more or less rebelled against their leadership and membership base, the federal Republican party has become broiled in a crisis of whether or not to expel all the representatives who moved to supply the Georgian Labor party. While the Buckley Republicans are adamantly in favor of expelling them, calling the Dewey Republicans "cuckservatives", the Dewey Republicans have said that the only reason this rebellion happened in the first place is because far right radicals have shifted the party too far to the right, to the point where much of the liberal voters feel abandoned by a party that has become more and more a mere extension of the Constitution party.
    Greens - A socially liberal and economically left of center party, their base in Georgia consists of young college students and professionals, concentrated in the more highly educated cities. While the party does have its concerns about the more socially conservative Hispanos Unidos they are more than happy with the environmentalism of the Populists which Labor also supports out of solidarity.
    Asian Action - A party for centrist Asian-Americans, the party just received its first representatives in 2016, and continues to gain in 2018 as Asian immigrants flock to the growing Atlanta megalopolis.

    Opposition:
    Democrats - A socially conservative, economically centrist party, they have fallen from their position as the largest party in Georgia with Labor having made in a comeback in 2018. Nevertheless they still are a force to be reckoned with as they promote their traditional values of welfare for whites only.
    Black Baptist Bloc - The party for rural and conservative African-Americans, they hold a grudge against Labor and the Populists for having eaten into their black base, and constantly fight tooth and nail to try and win back black voters. Relying heavily on religion to paint the two parties as "secular socialists" their attacks have not proven to be very successful and even when they have, the party realizes how they do not have any sort of allies to win a majority government, with the two largest parties of Labor and the Democrats being both sworn enemies of the BBB.
    Buckley Republicans- The socially conservative wing of the Republican party which can at times stray into the territory of the Constitutionists, they are furiously at how the Dewey representatives have abandoned their leadership to side with Labor over the Democrats. While the Buckley Republicans do have some issues with the welfare policies of the Democrats, the hate the welfare of Labor even more. They have petitioned to the national Republican party to have all the defecting Dewey representatives banned from the Republican party for life, a spark which now threatens to light the entire Republican party up in flames as the socially liberal and socially conservative factions of the GOP now stand posed to rip one another to shreds.
    Constitution - The party for the Christian right of America, they have been growing in popularity among the people of Georgia for decades now, as more and more people become disillusioned with the establishment Democrats and become radicalized into the far right. The party's call to end all immigration from Latin America has also gained it a number of followers from Atlanta's suburbs, who fear that Mexican culture could be taking over American culture, and who want to go back to the old days where white protestant men held all the power.
    Black Panther Party - A party of black nationalists and socialists, they have grown in popularity as Labor continues to ignore the plight of young black men, especially in the impoverished ghettos. The party want to bring an end to the brutal techniques which the state of Georgia currently uses for its police force, as well as end the mass incarceration of black folks for the simple crime of smoking a joint.

    [​IMG]
    Credit for the basemap goes to Chicxulub.
     
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