Hail, Britannia

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
I saw it on the "Presidents and Prime Ministers of Texas" list. should I not have said that?
There's no end date to her term in office on there. Though there are legislative and presidential election this October. 2020 is written next to her name but shaded the background colour as a placeholder to keep everything in line...
 
Basque Republic

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor


The Basque Republic, commonly known as the Basque Country, Vasconia or Navarre, is a member state of the European Union located on the Iberian Peninsula in Western Europe. It is located in the western Pyrenees on the coast of the Bay of Biscay, bordered by the Kingdom of the French to the northeast, Catalonia to the east, and the Kingdom of Castile to the southwest. The country is a unitary parliamentary constitutional republic, with its capital in Pamplona, divided into seven provinces spanning an area of 20,494 square kilometres (7,913 sq mi) and a total population of over 3 million.

Inhabited since the Palaeolithic era, Basque tribes were known to Ancient Greek and Roman writers, including the Vascones, the Aquitani and others. Roman expansion reached the region in the 2nd century BCE, although it would take until 65 BCE for most of the local tribes to be completely subjugated by the Romans, and Roman rule was not consolidated until the time of Emperor Augustus. Romanisation was limited in the Basque lands, and the lax control allowed the Basques to retain their traditional laws, leadership and language. During the collapse of the Western Roman Empire, the Basque region escaped Roman control at some point in the late 4th or early 5th century. Up to the 9th century, the Basque region, known as "Vasconia", was embroiled in numerous conflicts with the Franks to the north and the Iberian Visigoths to the south. In 824, the Kingdom of Pamplona, later Navarre, was founded, although by the turn of the millennium the regions had fragmented into a myriad of smaller states. Technically a vassal state of Córdoba, the kingdom was able to expand briefly until the 11th century, after which a series of partitions led to a reduction of its territory and the loss of direct access to the ocean.

During the 14th and 15th centuries, the Basque Country was ravaged by bitter partisan wars between noble families and dynastic disputes with the neighbouring Crown of Aragon. In 1512, the southern part of the kingdom was conquered by Ferdinand the Catholic, which was recognised by the Treaty of Cambrai of 1529, while the part of the kingdom north of the Pyrenees remained independent. The southern part was annexed to the Crown of Castile. In 1589, the kingdom was again joined with France in personal union when Henry III inherited the French throne as Henri IV, and by 1620 it was largely absorbed into the Kingdom of France, marking the end of an independent Basque state. The Basque region would remain divided under French and Spanish control until 1814. Self-government in the region was gradually eroded by successive absolutist French and Spanish monarchs, more so in the north Basque Country than in the southern districts. The French Revolution centralised the government of France, abolished the special powers that the Northern Basque Country had enjoyed for centuries, and pursued the dissolution of the Basque identity into the new French nation. At the Congress of Vienna, the restored Bourbons in Spain were granted the northern Basque territories, ceded from France in perpetuity, marking the first time in three centuries that the entire Basque Country was united under a single monarch.

Fearing that they would lose their historic self-government under a liberal Spanish constitution, many Basques sided with the traditionalists during the Legitimist Wars that ravaged Spain in the 19th century. Despite the defeat of the legitimist forces in the first war, the Basque Country was able to retain a set of important prerogatives. During the Spanish Revolution of the 1860s, the Basques were one of the first regions to openly side with the republicans, although the First Spanish Republic that emerged from conflict attempted to undermine the Basque Country's separate status. Theses tensions culminated in the Third Legitimist War (1872-1876), with most of the Basque territories forming a de facto independent state under the Legitimist claimant, Roberto of Parma. The victory of the Republic over the Legitimists led to the loss of nominal Basque sovereignty, with the districts assimilated into Spanish provinces. In the late 19th and early 20th centuries, the Basque Country began to industrialise, drawing Spanish-speaking migrants from the rest of the country that threatened the relatively homogeneous Basque-speaking region. The outbreak of the First World War, in which Spain remained neutral, was a boost to Basque industrialisation, as steel production and export expanded due to the demands of the war effort.

During the interwar period, attempts were made to draw up a statute for the granting of self-government to the Basque Country as a whole, but the outbreak of the Spanish Civil War curtailed those efforts. In July 1936, a military uprising erupted across Spain, in the face of which the Basque Country was divided. The Basque nationalist movement was divided, with many siding with the Spanish republicans, while Navarre supported General Francisco Franco's insurgent forces. Numerous atrocities were committed against the Basques during the war, most notably the German bombing of Gernika. With the end of the civil war, and Franco's drive to establish a totalitarian nation state, many Basques fled into exile, including the soldiers of the Eusko Gudarostea, who went first to France, and later to Britain to fight with Allies during the Second World War. Francoist Spain enacted harsh laws against minorities, aiming to wipe out their cultures and languages. After Francoist Spain's defeat in the Second World War, the Basque territories were occupied by France as part of their occupation zone, and came under French administration, as the Basque Protectorate. Internally self-governing since its creation, the last vestiges of French military control and administration ended on 15 December 1957, with the formal establishment of the "Basque Republic", the first independent Basque state in nearly five hundred years.

On 1 January 1958, the Basque Republic became a founding member of the European Economic Community. Over the decades the country has remained a close French ally, and one of the most integrated members of the European Union, as part of both the Eurozone and the European Defence Organisation, as well as an observer at La Francophonie. The economy of the country is highly developed, with a high gross domestic product, and since the decline of the traditional steel and shipbuilding industries in the 1980s the services and tourism sectors have grown. Today, the country's economy is dominated by machine tool, aeronautics and the energy sector.
 
Last edited:
@LeinadB93, in regards with my home country, the Philippines, is my country whether if it is a constitutional monarchy under a British monarch or a sole constitutional parliamentary republic? Who's the current PMs of the Philippines?
 
@LeinadB93, in regards with my home country, the Philippines, is my country whether if it is a constitutional monarchy under a British monarch or a sole constitutional parliamentary republic? Who's the current PMs of the Philippines?
I don't know who is the current PM, but in this quote he says that the Philippines is a commonwealth realm
The monarchy is generally more powerful in Britain ITTL, although its status in the Commonwealth realms is weaker - especially Patagonia and the Philippines where the monarchy has comparable power to the OTL Swedish monarch. @Turquoise Blue did a post on North American political attitudes, but effectively the British peerage retains some soft power and influence under the ideals of "noblesse oblige".
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
@LeinadB93, in regards with my home country, the Philippines, is my country whether if it is a constitutional monarchy under a British monarch or a sole constitutional parliamentary republic? Who's the current PMs of the Philippines?
I don't know who is the current PM, but in this quote he says that the Philippines is a commonwealth realm
Major credit to @HongCanucker and @Turquoise Blue for fleshing out Filipino politics. The broad idea is that the Philippines pass to the British Empire after the Spanish Revolution, but immediately erupts into the Philippine Revolt. The British regain control through force, but basically buy of the Filipinos with stronger local government and more investment. Weirdly the Crown Colony of the Philippines is never really a proper British colony, and is a semi-dominion from 1868 to 1911 when home rule comes in, and then the Statute of Westminster and the London Declaration sees it transition to an autonomous dominion and then Comonwealth realm.

Filipino nationalism is weirdly pro-British, owing to the historic memory of British colonial rule compared to that of Spain. Constitutional reform in the 1980s led to the patriation of the Filipino Constitution, and much like Patagonia the "Governor-General" was renamed the "President-General" and the power of the monarchy was reduced to almost non-existent. Effectively a crowned republic with most, if not all, executive power vested in the prime minister. The Queen is still "Queen of the Philippine Islands" but she has no power there beyond her high approval amongst Filipinos as a social and cultural figure. The real impetus to cut off the final royal link just isn't there, plus the inherent (ITTL) instability seen in republics, and the fear of the influence of republican China.

The current Prime Minister is Aquilino Pimentel III. The Philippines also have a stronger economy, more on par with Australia than OTL.

I've said before that I have a country and election box ready to go, just needs the write up. If you give me a week I'll get them finished off :)
 
Presidents and Prime Ministers of the Basque Republic

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor

Presidents of the Basque Republic (1946–)
11. 1946–1967 René Cassin (Independent)
12. 1967–1974 Manuel Aznar Zubigaray (Independent)
13. 1974–1981 Telesforo Monzón (National)
14. 1981–1988 José María de Areilza (People's Union)
15. 1988–2002 Xabier Arzalluz (National)
16. 2002–2009 Doris Benegas (National)
17. 2009–2016 Javier Otano (Socialist)
18. 2016–2024 Miguel Sanz (People's Union)

Prime Ministers of the Basque Republic (1946–) [Commonly known as the Lehendakari]
11. 1946–1960 José Antonio Aguirre† (National)
12. 1960–1963 Jesús María de Leizaola (National) (1st)
13. 1963–1970 Ramón Rubial (Socialist)
12. 1970–1975 Jesús María de Leizaola (National) (2nd)
14. 1975–1981 Carlos Garaikoetxea (National)
15. 1981–1985 Jaime Ignacio del Burgo (People's Union)
16. 1985–1989 José Antonio Ardanza (National) (1st)
17. 1989–1993 José María Benegas (Socialist)
18. 1993–1996 Juan Cruz Ali (People's Union)
16. 1996–1999 José Antonio Ardanza (National) (2nd)
19. 1999–2002 Jaime Mayor Oreja (People's Union)
10. 2002–2006 Gabriel Urralburu (Socialist)
11. 2006–2009 Juan José Ibarretxe (National)
12. 2009–2010 Patxi López (Socialist)
13. 2010–2012 Yolanda Barcina (People's Union)
14. 2012–2019 Iñigo Urkullu (National)
15. 2019–2020 María Chivite (Socialist)
 
Regions of England

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
I hope @Airesien doesn't mind, but I got inspired by their States of the United Commonwealth post to finish my work on the Regions of England ITTL:


England is a unitary dominion divided into thirteen devolved regions, all of which are self-governing but unlike the federal dominions of Columbia and Australia, England, much like New Zealand and Oregon, has an uncodified constitution, meaning that the powers devolved to the regions are not codified in a single document. Legally the devolution of powers to the regions is reversible, with these powers ultimately residing with the central government. Prior to 1950, England was governed directly from London by the imperial government as part of the island of Great Britain. Following the granting of home rule to Scotland and Wales in 1950, England became the last part of the "integrated empire" without home rule, and it would take 17 years for the imbalance to be rectified. Under the Javits government, England gained home rule as the 23rd dominion on 12 July 1967, organised as a unitary state with its capital in London. Under Harold Wilson, the first First Minister of England, the constitutional organisation of the new English state was overhauled, with the capital relocating to Birmingham in 1969, and the creation of the first devolved regions in 1973 - Wessex, Yorkshire, Northumbria, and North West England. In 1979 devolution was extended to the regions of East Anglia, Essex, Kent and Sussex, while in 1984 the regions of West Mercia, East Mercia and Lincolnshire gained their own legislatures. In 1986, the Greater London Council was abolished, and the region became the 12th devolved region. In 1991, Cornwall separated from Wessex before seceding as its own dominion in 1999, and in the same year North West England was dissolved and replaced by Lancashire and Cheshire, and Cumbria.

All the regions have broad legislative powers in the fields of; agriculture, communities, the economy, environmental and rural affairs, education, finance, health and infrastructure. The English government and parliament has retained the exclusive power to legislate on several reserved and excepted matters, including; defence, currency, international and internal relations, national security, elections, and justice, among others. There have been several proposals over the decades to codify the English constitutional system, and establish a formal federal system in the country, but at present only the Movement for the Regions, a broad tent regionalist party, supports constitutional reform.





 
Last edited:

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
As always, great work and glad I could provide some inspiration! Have you got a list of English First Ministers and last English election planned out? :)
Thanks :) Any input from anyone is always appreciated! I'm really looking forward to your series BTW!

I do have a list of First Ministers, but it needs a bit of work, and the same for the election where the map is causing trouble :p
 
Last edited:
Hey, love the Basque Republic.

Just some questions:
1. Does the Levant Republic have the most Jews out of any country in the world? It is 30% Jewish, so it has about 5.5 million Jews.
2. Could we get a wikibox on New Israel, Romania, and/or Poland?
3. How come Ukraine and Livonia aren't in the EU?
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Hey, love the Basque Republic.

Just some questions:
1. Does the Levant Republic have the most Jews out of any country in the world? It is 30% Jewish, so it has about 5.5 million Jews.
2. Could we get a wikibox on New Israel, Romania, and/or Poland?
3. How come Ukraine and Livonia aren't in the EU?
Thanks:

1. No, the United Empire has the largest Jewish population in the world. The Levant is second, followed by New Israel and the Soviet Union.

2. I have one in the works for New Israel, probbaly later this month. Rumania and Poland are a bit more complicated, as I know less about the political situation, but I'll have a think.

3. Ukraine for similar reasons to OTL, but a much closer relationship with the USSR. Latvia and Estonia take a... different path after the First World War.

Will the EU eventually expand to include the remaining Western Balkans?
Most likely. Thanks to @Damian0358 for helping flesh out the region.

Broadly speaking;
Albania and Dardania are negotiating candidates, and areexpected to probably join by the mid-to-end of the decade.​
Peonia is a recognised candidate - but the application is stalled largely by Bulgaria, and is unlikely to join before 2030.​
Armanonia is a recognised candidate - but the application has stalled due to government issues, and is unlikely to join before 2030.​
Ukraine is a potential candiate with a submitted membership application.​
Cilicia is a potential candidate - but has not applied due to their distance from Europe and Turkish pressure.​

Turkey is not a candidate and never submitted an application. Neither did Morocco ITTL, and as the enlargment list shows Cyprus is not a member state.
 
2019 Basque legislative election

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor


The 2019 Basque legislative election was held on 26 May 2019 to elect, under the d’hondt method of party list proportional representation, the 82 members of the National Assembly, the lower house of the bicameral Basque Parliament. The seven provinces of the Basque Republic form multi-member constituencies, and each province elects members of parliament in proportion to its population. Under the Basque Constitution, the decision to call legislative elections is a prerogative power of the president, so long as a legislative term last no more four years. After each election the president must appoint a prime minister who can command the confidence of the assembly.

The centrist liberal Christian democratic Nationalists (Euzko Alderdi Jeltzalea; AJ) had held the premiership under Iñigo Urkullu since the 2012 elecion, with the tacit support of the centre-right moderate Christian democratic and conservative People's Union (Euzko Herriaren Batasuna; HB), led by former prime minster Yolanda Barcina. Despite a strong showing for the Nationalists, gaining a seat and increasing their share of the vote, the losses suffered by the People's Union made them reluctant to support a new Nationalist government. The centre-left Socialists (Euzko Alderdi Sozialista; AS), under María Chivite, had displaced the People's Union as the second-largest party in the assembly with a net gain of 9 seats, while the ecological Basque party, Greens Together (Elkarrekin Berdea; EB), led by long-time leader Léonie Agergarai, held their 4 seats. The left-wing nationalist Basque Solidarity (Eusko Alkartasuna; EA), under new leader Maddalen Iriarte, successfully re-entered the assembly after losing all their seats at the 2015 election.

Despite intensive negotiations between the three main parties of Basque politics, Urkullu was unable to gather enough support to form a government and despite being given a mandate by President Miguel Sanz he did not call an invesiture vote. After Urkullu failed to gain support, the president invited Chivite to form a government, and with the support of the People's Union and Greens Together she was confirmed by a vote of the new National Assembly and invested as the 15th prime minister. The 2019 election marked the first time in the history of the Basque Republic that the largest party in the National Assembly did not form the government.
 
Last edited:
Hi Leinad, loving the timeline as always (well we except he who must not be named but somehow was a PM which I still do not understand), but I wondering about a few things.

A) Will you be moving some old post to the Hail Britannia timeline due to some of old links to Map thread breaking a few weeks/months back?

B) Will you be doing anymore of your Stargate/Assassin's Creed spin off post anytime soon and will you potentially make the spin off posts into a new thread at some point with other series, like a thread of the Hail Britannia which is 2 steps to the right of reality (Doctor who reference) with SPC Fondation or MCU posts, etc?

C) Will you do more Britannia culture posts on topics like Star Trek or the Fallout series, as it would be interesting to see your the different culture would change these series (Fallout would be interesting due to the trans continental nature of Britannia)?

D) How different was the Atomic Threat to Britannia compared to the OTL USA or U.K., due to the trans continental nature of Britannia and that the Capital/Homelands of Britannia (the British Isles) was accessible to soviet nuclear attack before the creation of intercontinental blistic missile, unlike the OTL USA?

E) How different was creation Britannia version of NASA due to the Victorians fascination with space and OTL Britains Interplanetary society never being absorbed into the space program in OTL, also was it funded better than OTL NASA after the space race ?
 
Last edited:
Top