Hail, Britannia

Hebrew still develops, but there are fewer speakers than OTL. I have an infobox ready for the language, but I'm umming and ahing about a change to the Levantine flag (top right without the arms is the current version):
Personally, I favour the current one, as it's specific, but not overly specific, if you get what I mean...
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
I know @LeinadB93 did Doctor Who, but how about Britain's other big pop culture icon: Bond. James Bond.

Hmm... tempting, but I'm not great on pop cultures and all my collaborations in that field seem to fall by the roadside...

Personally, I favour the current one, as it's specific, but not overly specific, if you get what I mean...

Me too TBH... can't seem to come up with an alternative that isn't cluttered...

What happens to Wales and Cornwall when the heir apparent is a minor?

There's no legislation in place for that scenario. Most politicians won't discuss it and only a handful of constitutional scholars have raised concerns. Given the current line of succession is looking secure, and William likely won't be King-Emperor before George is 18, no one is particularly interested in an unlikely "what if".

Unofficially, what has been agreed based on constitutional convention and the Welsh and Cornish dominion Charters is that - in Wales the title won't be awarded till the heir reaches maturity, so their powers and responsibilities remain with the monarch; while in Cornwall the title is automatic, but the power and responsibilities will be exercised by the monarch until the heir reaches 18.

Is the official blue for Scotland’s flag still Pantone 300 ITL, and is the blue on the Union Jack still Pantone 180?
*280, not 180

Yes those are the official Pantone colours.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Um wait what why is there a separate Scottish Throne (and a separate Irish one at that) along side the British Throne?

The British Throne is by definition the merger of first the English and Scottish Throne and then then the addition of the Irish there are no separate thrones. While it would be slightly different in HB TL due to no Act of Union 1801 but the later Act of Union 1876, the result is the same with one throne in the UKE.

The separate thrones we currently have OTL (Queen of Canada, Queen of Australia, etc) is because all the separate countries are in personal Union with the UK. The inside the UK the separate titles still exist but there is only one Throne.
Yes I reread that post to make sure I hadn’t missed anything however that doesn’t change my point, by recreating the Scottish Monarch the British monarch as it stands before 1949 ceases to exist.

I have looked through the timeline and have and as far as I can figure out the reestablising of the monarchs for Scotland, Wales, Ireland etc contradicts the rest of the TL in regards to the UKE state.

The British Crown is made up by the merger and abolitionment of its constituent parts both in OTL and TL, if you recreate its constitution parts as separate entities the merger entity ceases to be, which according to the TL hasn’t happened thereby creating a contradicting situation (both statements can’t be true by how they are currently explained as they contradict each other).

The constitutional structure of the United Empire with regards to the monarchy and the various "thrones/crowns" is modelled on the OTL Canadian federal system, with an extra dose of confederalism and devolution. IOTL the Canadian monarch is also the monarch of Ontario, Quebec, Alberta, Nova Scotia etc. and I am assuming that if a province was divided (say Ontario) it wouldn't affect the federal monarchy. ITTL the monarch is still Queen of Great Britain, but within that England, Scotland, Wales and Cornwall are covered.

You are correct - the 1707 Acts of Union dissolved the separate English and Scottish thrones and formed the British monarchy. At this time the Irish monarchy had been a separate institution (but in personal union) since 1542, and after 1753 the Virginian monarchy came into being. The status of the British American colonies was vague, but they weren't separate monarchies, just colonies of the British monarch.

Now as the various North American dominions (Columbia, Carolina etc.) were formed, they were created as effectively separate, but subordinate, thrones/crowns, to the British monarchy. So Queen Victoria, when she came to the throne was Queen of Great Britain, Ireland and Virginia, Empress of All Britain, but as the dominions were formed the titles of Queen of New England, Queen of Canada, Queen over the States of the Ohio Country and Protector of Its Lands and Peoples, etc. were added to the full royal and imperial style. So gradually what emerged was a patchwork of states across the Home Isles and North America that were nominally self-governing and independent, but in personal union with the British monarchy.

Now after the 1876 Acts of Union, an important distinction begins to emerge; the British monarch is styled "King/Queen in the Dominions beyond the Seas". The terms of the Union expressely maintains these separate "thrones/crowns" in "perpetual and indivisible union". This is an important constitutional distinction - although they continue to referred to in common speech as "King/Queen of Louisiana, Australia etc." the "in" bit means their royal role in the dominions is a part of the overall British monarchy. So this is different from OTL, where the Statute of Westminster created the distinct Canadian monarchy, here it is just a subsidiary title/throne/crown of the British imperial monarchy. With Patagonia and Capeland moving towards independence, that distinction becomes important as in these realms they are "King/Queen of etc.".

So far so good - but with devolution in Great Britain there emerges a problem. However it can be solved within the established imperial framework. In Scotland and England the ancient thrones are re-established, but they are subsidiary titles of the British imperial monarchy. In Wales and Cornwall, where the constitutional structures have the Prince/Grand Duke as a secondary monarch, the monarch is referred to as the "Queen in Right of Wales/Cornwall".

Hope that answers the questions. I don't think any canon on this subject contradicts itself. The term "throne" is just a common reference, though perhaps somewhat inaccurate.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
The Nigerian Civil War is still ongoing, as it has been intermittently since the 2003 assassination of President Ali Saibou. Currently the country is divided three ways between the:
  • Governmental of National Accord (Niamey) led by Mahamadou Issoufou and Issaka Sidibe (largely backed by the Soviet Union, Iran and the Collective Security Treaty Organisation)
  • National Transition Council (Serekunda) led by Abdoulaye Wade and Adama Barrow (largely backed by the United Empire, the European Union and the Common Defence Pact)
  • Revolutionary Military Committee (Timbuktu) led by Amadou Sanogo (largely lacking in international support with the exception of paramilitary groups)
Since August 2020, the GNA and the NTC have established a ceasefire under the Christovia Accords in order to coordinate efforts against the Revolutionary Military Committee and Tuareg insurgents in the north of country. The British and Soviets (and their allies) have aligned their forces to support the two Nigerian governments in meeting their objectives ahead of the planned Marseilles Conference in September 2021 - where it is hoped a last peace will be achieved and a roadmap put in place for democratic elections in early 2022.
 
The constitutional structure of the United Empire with regards to the monarchy and the various "thrones/crowns" is modelled on the OTL Canadian federal system, with an extra dose of confederalism and devolution. IOTL the Canadian monarch is also the monarch of Ontario, Quebec, Alberta, Nova Scotia etc. and I am assuming that if a province was divided (say Ontario) it wouldn't affect the federal monarchy. ITTL the monarch is still Queen of Great Britain, but within that England, Scotland, Wales and Cornwall are covered.

You are correct - the 1707 Acts of Union dissolved the separate English and Scottish thrones and formed the British monarchy. At this time the Irish monarchy had been a separate institution (but in personal union) since 1542, and after 1753 the Virginian monarchy came into being. The status of the British American colonies was vague, but they weren't separate monarchies, just colonies of the British monarch.

Now as the various North American dominions (Columbia, Carolina etc.) were formed, they were created as effectively separate, but subordinate, thrones/crowns, to the British monarchy. So Queen Victoria, when she came to the throne was Queen of Great Britain, Ireland and Virginia, Empress of All Britain, but as the dominions were formed the titles of Queen of New England, Queen of Canada, Queen over the States of the Ohio Country and Protector of Its Lands and Peoples, etc. were added to the full royal and imperial style. So gradually what emerged was a patchwork of states across the Home Isles and North America that were nominally self-governing and independent, but in personal union with the British monarchy.

Now after the 1876 Acts of Union, an important distinction begins to emerge; the British monarch is styled "King/Queen in the Dominions beyond the Seas". The terms of the Union expressely maintains these separate "thrones/crowns" in "perpetual and indivisible union". This is an important constitutional distinction - although they continue to referred to in common speech as "King/Queen of Louisiana, Australia etc." the "in" bit means their royal role in the dominions is a part of the overall British monarchy. So this is different from OTL, where the Statute of Westminster created the distinct Canadian monarchy, here it is just a subsidiary title/throne/crown of the British imperial monarchy. With Patagonia and Capeland moving towards independence, that distinction becomes important as in these realms they are "King/Queen of etc.".

So far so good - but with devolution in Great Britain there emerges a problem. However it can be solved within the established imperial framework. In Scotland and England the ancient thrones are re-established, but they are subsidiary titles of the British imperial monarchy. In Wales and Cornwall, where the constitutional structures have the Prince/Grand Duke as a secondary monarch, the monarch is referred to as the "Queen in Right of Wales/Cornwall".

Hope that answers the questions. I don't think any canon on this subject contradicts itself. The term "throne" is just a common reference, though perhaps somewhat inaccurate.
That explains it, might I suggest this is either added to the Monarch of the UKE in more in universe style or as its own post describing this unique form of monarchy.

The reason before this explanation, that the recreation of monarch’s of Scottish, Irish, etc contradicted the rest of the timeline is that it had already been established that the British Monarch was the Monarch of these realms by title (and by personal Union).

In addition as the British Monarchy was founded on the merger and dissolution of the earlier titles, it was confusing on how it could exist when those previous titles were recreated.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Are counties the administrative divisions of Virginia? Do independent cities exist?

Independent cities exist in Virginia ITTL.

That explains it, might I suggest this is either added to the Monarch of the UKE in more in universe style or as its own post describing this unique form of monarchy.

The reason before this explanation, that the recreation of monarch’s of Scottish, Irish, etc contradicted the rest of the timeline is that it had already been established that the British Monarch was the Monarch of these realms by title (and by personal Union).

In addition as the British Monarchy was founded on the merger and dissolution of the earlier titles, it was confusing on how it could exist when those previous titles were recreated.

Something is in the works.
 
Hebrew language

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor


Hebrew (עִבְרִית‎, Ivrit) is a Northwest Semitic language spoken by Jewish communities worldwide. As of 2020, Modern Hebrew is spoken by over 8 million people worldwide, with nearly 5 million native speakers. Modern Hebrew is one of the official languages of the Levantine Union and the State of New Israel, while premodern Hebrew is used for prayer or study in Jewish communities around the world today. Hebrew is also a recognised minority language in Kitara, the Soviet Union and the United Empire. The Levant has the largest Hebrew-speaking population, with about 6 million fluent speakers, followed by New Israel with 1.5 million. About 460,000 speakers reside in the United Empire, mostly from the Levant, while Kitara has the fourth largest Hebrew-speaking population (about 220,000) and the Soviet republic of Yevrey has a small population of about 40,000 speakers.

The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date to the 10th century BCE. Hebrew ceased to be an everyday spoken language somewhere between 200 and 400 CE, declining in the aftermath of the Bar Kokhba revolt. Aramaic and, to a lesser extent, Greek were already in use as international languages, especially among elites and immigrants. Hebrew survived into the medieval period as the language of Jewish liturgy, rabbinic literature, intra-Jewish commerce and poetry. With the rise of the Haskalah – the Jewish Enlightenment – in the 19th century, Hebrew was revived as a literary language for secular purposes, and later as a spoken tongue that became the main language of the Yishuv.

The revival of Hebrew as a mother tongue began in the late 19th century Palestine, then part of the Ottoman Empire. Eliezer Ben-Yehuda led the movement for making the literary and liturgical language into an everyday spoken language, through his organisational efforts, the establishment of schools and the writing of textbooks. In 1890 A Committee of the Hebrew Language was established, which became the Academy of the Hebrew Language in 1953. Further Jewish immigration to Palestine before the Arabian War (1915–17) aided the vernacularisation of Hebrew, and the movement caught real momentum. During the Allied Mandate period (1920–48) many soon understrood the need for a common language amongst Jews, who were arriving from diverse countries and speaking different languages. When the French Mandate of Lebanon and Galilee and the British Mandate of Judea, Palestine and Sinai recognised Hebrew as an official language, its new formal status contributed greatly to its diffusion.

Currently, 90% of Levantine Jews are proficient in Hebrew, and 70% are highly proficient, while 30% of New Israeli Jews reported some proficiency. In the Soviet Union, the use of spoken Hebrew was suppressed until the 1990s, when the relaxation of education laws allowed Hebrew to be taught as a spoken language openly. As of 2020, 20% of Soviet Jews are proficient in Hebrew, though the majority continue to speak Yiddish as their native language. In the 2011 British census, a majority of Ararati Jews reported some knowledge of Hebrew, although only 10% reported Hebrew as their native language, with 90% speaking Yiddish. The majority of Hebrew-speaking British Jews are recent immigrants or Levantine citizens. Kitari Jews largely speak Swahili and Hebrew, and are mostly descended from the Beta Israel – Ethiopian Jews – who fled Ethiopia in the mid 20th century, although there is also a large number of Hebrew-speaking Jewish communities throughout Eastern and Southern Africa, particularly Capeland, Zanzibar and Azanyika.
 

Nürnberger

Banned


Hebrew (עִבְרִית‎, Ivrit) is a Northwest Semitic language spoken by Jewish communities worldwide. As of 2020, Modern Hebrew is spoken by over 8 million people worldwide, with nearly 5 million native speakers. Modern Hebrew is one of the official languages of the Levantine Union and the State of New Israel, while premodern Hebrew is used for prayer or study in Jewish communities around the world today. Hebrew is also a recognised minority language in Kitara, the Soviet Union and the United Empire. The Levant has the largest Hebrew-speaking population, with about 6 million fluent speakers, followed by New Israel with 1.5 million. About 460,000 speakers reside in the United Empire, mostly from the Levant, while Kitara has the fourth largest Hebrew-speaking population (about 220,000) and the Soviet republic of Yevrey has a small population of about 40,000 speakers.

The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date to the 10th century BCE. Hebrew ceased to be an everyday spoken language somewhere between 200 and 400 CE, declining in the aftermath of the Bar Kokhba revolt. Aramaic and, to a lesser extent, Greek were already in use as international languages, especially among elites and immigrants. Hebrew survived into the medieval period as the language of Jewish liturgy, rabbinic literature, intra-Jewish commerce and poetry. With the rise of the Haskalah – the Jewish Enlightenment – in the 19th century, Hebrew was revived as a literary language for secular purposes, and later as a spoken tongue that became the main language of the Yishuv.

The revival of Hebrew as a mother tongue began in the late 19th century Palestine, then part of the Ottoman Empire. Eliezer Ben-Yehuda led the movement for making the literary and liturgical language into an everyday spoken language, through his organisational efforts, the establishment of schools and the writing of textbooks. In 1890 A Committee of the Hebrew Language was established, which became the Academy of the Hebrew Language in 1953. Further Jewish immigration to Palestine before the Arabian War (1915–17) aided the vernacularisation of Hebrew, and the movement caught real momentum. During the Allied Mandate period (1920–48) many soon understrood the need for a common language amongst Jews, who were arriving from diverse countries and speaking different languages. When the French Mandate of Lebanon and Galilee and the British Mandate of Judea, Palestine and Sinai recognised Hebrew as an official language, its new formal status contributed greatly to its diffusion.

Currently, 90% of Levantine Jews are proficient in Hebrew, and 70% are highly proficient, while 30% of New Israeli Jews reported some proficiency. In the Soviet Union, the use of spoken Hebrew was suppressed until the 1990s, when the relaxation of education laws allowed Hebrew to be taught as a spoken language openly. As of 2020, 20% of Soviet Jews are proficient in Hebrew, though the majority continue to speak Yiddish as their native language. In the 2011 British census, a majority of Ararati Jews reported some knowledge of Hebrew, although only 10% reported Hebrew as their native language, with 90% speaking Yiddish. The majority of Hebrew-speaking British Jews are recent immigrants or Levantine citizens. Kitari Jews largely speak Swahili and Hebrew, and are mostly descended from the Beta Israel – Ethiopian Jews – who fled Ethiopia in the mid 20th century, although there is also a large number of Hebrew-speaking Jewish communities throughout Eastern and Southern Africa, particularly Capeland, Zanzibar and Azanyika.
"Yevrey" is literally just a word "jew"in Russian, it's like if USA was called "American"

Otherwise great post
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
What's the government system in New Israel, and who's the head of state?

New Israel is a parliamentary republic, currently led by President Meir Sheetrit and Prime Minister Shelley Yachimo


"Yevrey" is literally just a word "jew"in Russian, it's like if USA was called "American"

Otherwise great post

Yes, but in the West it is the name used for the region that is referred to locally and throughout the Soviet Union as the “Jewish Republic”.
 


Hebrew (עִבְרִית‎, Ivrit) is a Northwest Semitic language spoken by Jewish communities worldwide. As of 2020, Modern Hebrew is spoken by over 8 million people worldwide, with nearly 5 million native speakers. Modern Hebrew is one of the official languages of the Levantine Union and the State of New Israel, while premodern Hebrew is used for prayer or study in Jewish communities around the world today. Hebrew is also a recognised minority language in Kitara, the Soviet Union and the United Empire. The Levant has the largest Hebrew-speaking population, with about 6 million fluent speakers, followed by New Israel with 1.5 million. About 460,000 speakers reside in the United Empire, mostly from the Levant, while Kitara has the fourth largest Hebrew-speaking population (about 220,000) and the Soviet republic of Yevrey has a small population of about 40,000 speakers.

The earliest examples of written Paleo-Hebrew date to the 10th century BCE. Hebrew ceased to be an everyday spoken language somewhere between 200 and 400 CE, declining in the aftermath of the Bar Kokhba revolt. Aramaic and, to a lesser extent, Greek were already in use as international languages, especially among elites and immigrants. Hebrew survived into the medieval period as the language of Jewish liturgy, rabbinic literature, intra-Jewish commerce and poetry. With the rise of the Haskalah – the Jewish Enlightenment – in the 19th century, Hebrew was revived as a literary language for secular purposes, and later as a spoken tongue that became the main language of the Yishuv.

The revival of Hebrew as a mother tongue began in the late 19th century Palestine, then part of the Ottoman Empire. Eliezer Ben-Yehuda led the movement for making the literary and liturgical language into an everyday spoken language, through his organisational efforts, the establishment of schools and the writing of textbooks. In 1890 A Committee of the Hebrew Language was established, which became the Academy of the Hebrew Language in 1953. Further Jewish immigration to Palestine before the Arabian War (1915–17) aided the vernacularisation of Hebrew, and the movement caught real momentum. During the Allied Mandate period (1920–48) many soon understrood the need for a common language amongst Jews, who were arriving from diverse countries and speaking different languages. When the French Mandate of Lebanon and Galilee and the British Mandate of Judea, Palestine and Sinai recognised Hebrew as an official language, its new formal status contributed greatly to its diffusion.

Currently, 90% of Levantine Jews are proficient in Hebrew, and 70% are highly proficient, while 30% of New Israeli Jews reported some proficiency. In the Soviet Union, the use of spoken Hebrew was suppressed until the 1990s, when the relaxation of education laws allowed Hebrew to be taught as a spoken language openly. As of 2020, 20% of Soviet Jews are proficient in Hebrew, though the majority continue to speak Yiddish as their native language. In the 2011 British census, a majority of Ararati Jews reported some knowledge of Hebrew, although only 10% reported Hebrew as their native language, with 90% speaking Yiddish. The majority of Hebrew-speaking British Jews are recent immigrants or Levantine citizens. Kitari Jews largely speak Swahili and Hebrew, and are mostly descended from the Beta Israel – Ethiopian Jews – who fled Ethiopia in the mid 20th century, although there is also a large number of Hebrew-speaking Jewish communities throughout Eastern and Southern Africa, particularly Capeland, Zanzibar and Azanyika.
It's interesting how both the Soviet Union and United Empire have Jewish regions in relatively remote areas, has their ever been some sort of rivalry between the two Jewish regions?
 

Nürnberger

Banned
New Israel is a parliamentary republic, currently led by President Meir Sheetrit and Prime Minister Shelley Yachimo




Yes, but in the West it is the name used for the region that is referred to locally and throughout the Soviet Union as the “Jewish Republic”.
Ok, got it
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
It's interesting how both the Soviet Union and United Empire have Jewish regions in relatively remote areas, has their ever been some sort of rivalry between the two Jewish regions?

Rivalry in what way?

Any reason why the Jews of Beta Israel fled from Ethiopia?

Ethiopia has had a rough 20th century, with a major civil war throughout the 70s and 80s (though it is recovering and is now a fast growing economy and developing nation). The Jews of Beta Israel fled to avoid persecution and were aided by the Commonwealth (New Israel is not as interventionist as OTL Israel) and re-settled in Kitara.

Who leads each of the parties in this fine year of 2021? Still the same people as during the 2018 election?

Currently:
Conservatives: Luis Fortuño (since 2017)
Social Democrats: Bérénice Laurent (since 2018)
Liberals: Michael Bennet (since 2016, some rumblings in the party over changing leadership before 2023)
Greens: Jay Inslee (since 2020)
Heritage: Sarah Palin (since 2014)
Alliance of Regions: currently Peggy Flanagan (Native People's) of Indiana until 31 December 2022
Progressive Conservatives: Cory Gardner (since 2019)
Libertarian: Andrew Yang (since 2020)
Populists: Maxime Bernier (since 2018)
Socialist Labour: Hakeem Jeffries (since 2019)
 
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