Hail, Britannia

Yes indeed, they are variously described as the "Royal Guard" or "Royal Militia" and are basically TTL's equivalent of the OTL National Guard - they are under the control of the dominions, but can be imperialised during war time or an emergency (i.e. The Troubles).

I just now realized that "imperialism", as a phrase, will have similar connotations to "federalism" ITTL instead of what it has IOTL. XD
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
I hope a Hail Britannia universe version of Allo Allo is not too much to ask for...

Hmm... I might already be working on something for this week's wikibox contest ;)

I just now realized that "imperialism", as a phrase, will have similar connotations to "federalism" ITTL instead of what it has IOTL. XD

Yes indeed it will XD at least within the Empire, though the modern connotations - at least in terms of the British system - might best be described as "Confederal imperialism". Perhaps OTL imperialism is either still referred to as imperialism, or imperial capitalism, imperial expansion...

What about Blackadder or Yes Minister?

Yes Minister could be worth a look...
 
1937 New England federal election

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
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The 1937 New England federal election (formally the 22nd New England general election) was held on 14 October 1937 to elect, under the first past the post system, the 215 members of the House of Commons of New England, of the 22nd Parliament. The election was a watershed moment in New England politics, as the incumbent Conservative government of First Minister Frank L. Greene was defeated by Jasper McLevy's Social Democrats, who formed a coalition government with the Liberals.

The election took place as the Great Depression entered its ninth year, and the central issue was the economy. The Conservatives under Greene, in office since the death of Calvin Coolidge in 1933, had done little to stimulate the economy despite being re-elected in 1935 on a platform of financial reforms and economic recovery. Widespread disatisfaction with high unemployment and inaction by the federal government meant voters were unwilling to allow the Conservatives to govern, and support shifted to McLevy's Social Democrats, who had formed the official opposition since 1935. The Liberals, which had historically been one of the two main parties of New England politics, had been reduced to 23 seats at the 1935 election, their worst ever electoral performance.

As Conservative support collapsed in many urban ridings, McLevy and the Social Democrats held steady, seeing a net gain of 32 seats mainly along the Boston-New York corridor, becoming the largest party in the house, but falling 16 seats short of a majority. The Conservative suffered one of their worst electoral defeats, losing 70 seats, and Greene announced his resignation as leader the following day. Under new leader Joseph P. Kennedy, 3rd Duke of Barnstable[1], the Liberals doubled their number of seats, largely in suburban and semi-rural ridings at the expense of the Conservatives. The Progressives won 2 ridings in Rhode Island, and consolidated their support in Maine and New Brunswick, while the newly formed Social Credit Party won 5 seats, with leader Styles Bridges defeating the Conservative incumbent in Merrimack and the party received strong support in New Hampshire. The left-wing socialist Workers' Action shocked pundits by taking 2 ridings, one each in Connecticut and Massachusetts Bay. A record 7 independent and unaffiliated MPs were elected, 3 under the "Liberal-Progressive" banner.

With no party able to command a majority, at first it seemed New England would have to return to the polls in early 1942. However, with the Conservatives clearly lacking a popular mandate to govern, the Social Democrats and Liberals came to a coalition agreement on 28 October, pledging to introduce financial and market reforms and boost economic recovery, adopting the principles of the "Roosevelt Deal", espoused by Franklin D. Roosevelt[2] of Columbia. McLevy was invited to form a government by the viceroy, and sworn in as the 15th First Minister of New England, with Kennedy as his deputy[3].

Credit to @Turquoise Blue for the original premise.
[1] - At the time New England did not have any laws against dual mandates, so although the Duke of Barnstable was a member of the Imperial Council of Lords, he was still eligible to run for election to the House of Commons of New England.
[2] - At the time Roosevelt was the incumbent First Minister of Columbia.
[3] - To this day, the Duke of Barnstable is the only peer to have served as either First Minister or Deputy First Minister of New England.
 
Styles Bridges as the Social Credit leader is an inspired choice, I have to say. Just out of curiosity, were there regionalist parties involved at this point, and what was New England's linguistic policy generally like in this period?
 
rd293tC.png


yCguMrn.png
The 1937 New England federal election (formally the 22nd New England general election) was held on 14 October 1937 to elect, under the first past the post system, the 215 members of the House of Commons of New England, of the 22nd Parliament. The election was a watershed moment in New England politics, as the incumbent Conservative government of First Minister Frank L. Greene was defeated by Jasper McLevy's Social Democrats, who formed a coalition government with the Liberals.

The election took place as the Great Depression entered its ninth year, and the central issue was the economy. The Conservatives under Greene, in office since the death of Calvin Coolidge in 1933, had done little to stimulate the economy despite being re-elected in 1935 on a platform of financial reforms and economic recovery. Widespread disatisfaction with high unemployment and inaction by the federal government meant voters were unwilling to allow the Conservatives to govern, and support shifted to McLevy's Social Democrats, who had formed the official opposition since 1935. The Liberals, which had historically been one of the two main parties of New England politics, had been reduced to 23 seats at the 1935 election, their worst ever electoral performance.

As Conservative support collapsed in many urban ridings, McLevy and the Social Democrats held steady, seeing a net gain of 32 seats mainly along the Boston-New York corridor, becoming the largest party in the house, but falling 16 seats short of a majority. The Conservative suffered one of their worst electoral defeats, losing 70 seats, and Greene announced his resignation as leader the following day. Under new leader Joseph P. Kennedy, 3rd Duke of Barnstable[1], the Liberals doubled their number of seats, largely in suburban and semi-rural ridings at the expense of the Conservatives. The Progressives won 2 ridings in Rhode Island, and consolidated their support in Maine and New Brunswick, while the newly formed Social Credit Party won 5 seats, with leader Styles Bridges defeating the Conservative incumbent in Merrimack and the party received strong support in New Hampshire. The left-wing socialist Workers' Action shocked pundits by taking 2 ridings, one each in Connecticut and Massachusetts Bay. A record 7 independent and unaffiliated MPs were elected, 3 under the "Liberal-Progressive" banner.

With no party able to command a majority, at first it seemed New England would have to return to the polls in early 1942. However, with the Conservatives clearly lacking a popular mandate to govern, the Social Democrats and Liberals came to a coalition agreement on 28 October, pledging to introduce financial and market reforms and boost economic recovery, adopting the principles of the "Roosevelt Deal", espoused by Franklin D. Roosevelt[2] of Columbia. McLevy was invited to form a government by the viceroy, and sworn in as the 15th First Minister of New England, with Kennedy as his deputy[3].

Credit to @Turquoise Blue for the original premise.
[1] - At the time New England did not have any laws against dual mandates, so although the Duke of Barnstable was a member of the Imperial Council of Lords, he was still eligible to run for election to the House of Commons of New England.
[2] - At the time Roosevelt was the incumbent First Minister of Columbia.
[3] - To this day, the Duke of Barnstable is the only peer to have served as either First Minister or Deputy First Minister of New England.
why is it william e foster instead of william z foster?
 
why is it william e foster instead of william z foster?
His birth middle-name was Edward. "Z." [which was assumed by many to stand for Zebulon] was, as Forging American communism notes: "When Foster departed for Spokane as Titus's chosen correspondent, it was decided that his name should be embellished with a 'Z.' A friend of Foster's, Harry Ault, later asserted that he had suggested the added initial as a way of adding distinction to the byline 'William Foster.' Titus himself explained that the 'Z' was added so that Foster could be sure of receiving mail that otherwise might be delivered to another 'William E.'"

In this world, because of the alternate path communism took in America, he never left for Spokane, and hence stayed with the label "William E. Foster". It's a small butterfly.
 
SoCred Styles Bridges? Wow, somebody finally does something interesting with him. And also, as a native Northwesterner (not that kind of native, though) I like how the Couer d'Alene Mine Wars suddenly became relevant in thread. I wonder if anyone here will do a TTL version.
 
Without getting too much into current politics, what's the state of Donald Trump's political party here? I know he founded his own breakaway party without much success. Does he still sit in the lords?

Also to throw a few names around, what became of: Henry Wallace, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, Hubert Humphrey, Tommy Douglas, Eugene McCarthy, Joseph McCarthy, Strom Thurmond, Walter Mondale, and Brian Mulroney?
 
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LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Styles Bridges as the Social Credit leader is an inspired choice, I have to say.
SoCred Styles Bridges? Wow, somebody finally does something interesting with him.

Credit to @Turquoise Blue for that :)

Just out of curiosity, were there regionalist parties involved at this point, and what was New England's linguistic policy generally like in this period?

No regionalist parties as of yet, they didn't really organise until the late 1940s after the end of the Second World War and only really became electoral forces after the 1970s.

The lingustic policy was very Anglocentric at the time. While Gaelic and French were not supresessed, the availability of government services was sporadic, and the infrastructure in non-Anglophone regions was generally underdeveloped. Even in the OTL Maritimes were their bi- and trilingualism was enshrined in the New England Charter, the availability of education and services in your native language was still poor, and Gaelophones and Francophones were massively underepresented in government and public services.

why is it william e foster instead of william z foster?
His birth middle-name was Edward. "Z." [which was assumed by many to stand for Zebulon] was, as Forging American communism notes: "When Foster departed for Spokane as Titus's chosen correspondent, it was decided that his name should be embellished with a 'Z.' A friend of Foster's, Harry Ault, later asserted that he had suggested the added initial as a way of adding distinction to the byline 'William Foster.' Titus himself explained that the 'Z' was added so that Foster could be sure of receiving mail that otherwise might be delivered to another 'William E.'"

In this world, because of the alternate path communism took in America, he never left for Spokane, and hence stayed with the label "William E. Foster". It's a small butterfly.

TB is correct.

And also, as a native Northwesterner (not that kind of native, though) I like how the Couer d'Alene Mine Wars suddenly became relevant in thread. I wonder if anyone here will do a TTL version.

Hmm... could be worth a look.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Without getting too much into current politics, what's the state of Donald Trump's political party here? I know he founded his own breakaway party without much success. Does he still sit in the lords?

I'm working a redux for Trump, which will probably be out later this week, so watch this space.

Also to throw a few names around, what became of: Henry Wallace, Dwight Eisenhower, Douglas MacArthur, Hubert Humphrey, Tommy Douglas, Eugene McCarthy, Joseph McCarthy, Strom Thurmond, Walter Mondale, and Brian Mulroney?

Wallace - Missouri politician, leader of the Farmer-Labour Party, later served as First Minister
Eisenhower - Chief of the Imperial General Staff during the Second World War; created Duke of Abilene for his services. Served as Viceroy of Missouri.
MacArthur - general in the East Asian War; created Earl MacArthur of Luzon for his services.
Humphrey - Missouri politician, served as First Minister
Douglas - Canadian politician, served as Premier of Saskatchewan, leader of the federal Commonwealth Co-operative, and Deputy First Minister under Pearson, Trudeau and Egan.
E. McCarthy - a prominent Minnesota and Missouri politcian, eventually elevated to the Imperial Council.
J. McCarthy - infamously associated with "McCarthyism" during the post-war Red Scare, elected to the Imperial Parliament in 1946, censured under the Menzies government but died in office before he could be removed.
Thurmond - pro-segregationist Imperial politician, left the Conservatives in 1957 to join the National Tory Union (which he led from 1964 to 1967 when it merged with other parties to form the British Heritage Party). As OTL he moderated his stances on segregation, never joining Heritage, and sat as an Independent in the Commons and later the Lords.
Mondale - Imperial politician, served as Foreign Secretary under Trudeau and Carter. Later became the Commonwealth Secretary-General.
Mulroney - Imperial politician, served as Health Secretary and Home Secretary under Thatcher.
 
Did something like OTL Jim Crow ever emerge in Texas? Also, how do present-day Texans reconcile with the fact that the Texan Revolution was at least partially motivated by slavery?
 
17 Amendment has the United States in the description.

Also regarding McArthur considering in OTL he was Anglophobe which caused problem during WW2, how different was he in TL considering he is British here.
 
Did something like OTL Jim Crow ever emerge in Texas? Also, how do present-day Texans reconcile with the fact that the Texan Revolution was at least partially motivated by slavery?
Probably in ways similar to how OTL Texans like me reconcile with the Revolution, in that we teach that it happened. We also focus on other causes, namely Santa Anna's tyranny
 
What happened to all of these figures?:
Marcus Garvey
Pete Buttigieg
Paul Simon (the politician)
Paul Simon (the musician)
Jay Inslee
Waldron Smithers
Rand Paul
Lee Atwater
Walt Disney
Hedy Lamarr
George Westinghouse
Thomas Edison
Nikola Tesla
John Lennon
Paul McCartney
George Harrison
Ringo Starr
Mary Landrieu
Tom Llamas
Orlando Bloom
J.K. Rowling
Richard Nixon
Jimmy Carter
Henry Ford
Henry A. Luce
 
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