Hail, Britannia

Uebeltank

Donor
hmm isn't Luxemburgish a German dialect? And i thought both it and Lichtenstein were part of the HRE? maybe i am wrong.
Afaik Norwegian is closer to Danish than Luxemburgish is to German. Bottom line is that OTL it is considered a separate language.
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
How? Was it annexed by Switzerland after WWI? (since in OTL it was actually specified in the treaty of Versailles that Liechtenstein (they wrote the name wrong, BTW) would remain independent, or somehow it was annexed on the Treaty of Vienna or when the German Confederation end? (in OTL the first had Liechtenstein remain independnet as a gift to the ruling prince, a major Austrian general and diplomat in the Napoleonic Wars who also ruled over vast fiefdoms in Austria and Bohemia; while the second had Liechtenstein's independence specifically reafirmed in the treaty that ended the German Confederation)
I will be looking into it in greater detail, but effectively the dire financial situation at the end of the Second World War means Liechtenstein joins Switzerland as a canton. The fact that Neuchatel remains a principality helps smooth its entry, as does its relatively smaller population.

How did Southern Germany become republican, wasn't Bavaria one of the regions that supported the return of monarchy the most in Germany at the time (while the House of Wittlesbach was even persecuted by the Nazis because of their anti-nazist sentiments)?
The description gives three sub-national monarchies. I'm assuming that this is Baden, Wurttemberg and Bavaria, with Bavarian Swabia and Bavarian Franconia being republics.
Raetia (southern Germany) is an area that is going to get explored in greater detail, but yes support for the return of monarchy in those regions was high in the post-war period. And the modern states were the result of divisions of the occupation zone into Baden, Wurttemberg, Bavaria, Swabia and Franconia. The former three are sub-national monarchies, while the latter are republics. Plus Nuremberg gets separated off as the capital city.

Who are the monarchs of Venezuela?
Based on context, I assume the king is this guy, husband of the second daughter of Dom Pedro II.
And more importantly, are they still a monarchy in the present day?
Venezuela is a republic in the present day, but its history is a blend of OTL Venezuela and Greece with an extra helping of batshit crazy.

The monarchs are from the House of Saxe-Coburg and Gotha-Koháry, placed on the throne after the country's independence in 1863. They get deposed and restored a few times. Venezuela is a region I'm looking into exploring in greater detail.

So the Morgenthau plan was adopted in this TL. :eek:
Uhhh, no. All the German states are developed and prosperous despite being politically divded.
A variant of the OTL Morgenthau plan was adopted yes. However the economic part fell by the wayside with the advent of the Cold War. France had the Rhenish Protectorate but had to gradually disengage due to its colonial crises. Nowadays they are all developed and prosperous, and still fairly industrialised.

pan german flag seems to show the incorrect eastern borders of brandenburg, otherwise 10/10 would read again
Thanks :) and thanks for catching that! It should line up now :)

About the Germanies, I believe that Rhineland and Raetia would get (so much) more tradition in terms of soccer than the rest (like Savoy in the Italian peninsula). Also, the UEFA Champions League slots' draft would be a hell to do it :biggrin:.
Oh definitely :)

hmm isn't Luxemburgish a German dialect? And i thought both it and Lichtenstein were part of the HRE? maybe i am wrong.
Afaik Norwegian is closer to Danish than Luxemburgish is to German. Bottom line is that OTL it is considered a separate language.
Luxembourgish is a separate language. Yes Liechtenstein, Luxembourg (& Limburg) were part of the HRE and the German Confederation, however they never formed part of the German Empire or Nazi Germany - which is the main criteria for inclusion ITTL as a "German state".
 
Well If my ego ever gets to big I can just look at this thread and it will collapse. But in all seriousness this is amazing and throws light on a period I was interested in ITTL. Inspired by Look to the West I assume?
 

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
Well If my ego ever gets to big I can just look at this thread and it will collapse. But in all seriousness this is amazing and throws light on a period I was interested in ITTL.
Why thank you :D I'll try not to let mine get too big!

Inspired by Look to the West I assume?
Yes I have been inspired by @Thande and Look To The West, which is absolutely amazing! But I like to think I've put my own spin on it :)
 
France

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor


France, officially the Kingdom of the French, is a transcontinental member state of the European Union whose territory consists of metropolitan France in Western Europe and several overseas regions and territories. The metropole of France extends from the Mediterranean Sea to the English Channel and the North Sea, and from the Rhine to the Atlantic Ocean. It is bordered by the United Belgian States and the Rhenish Republic to the northeast, the Federal Republic of Raetia, the Swiss Confederation, and the Kingdom of Savoy to the east, and the Principality of Andorra, Catalonia and the Basque Republic to the south. The overseas territories include French Guiana in South America, and several islands in the Atlantic, Pacific and Indian oceans. The overseas cities of Dakar in Africa, and Alexandretta and Guangzhouwan in Asia also form part of integral French territory. France is a unitary parliamentary constitutional monarchy spanning a combined area of 638,956 square kilometres (246,702 sq mi) and a total population of nearly 72 million, with its capital in Paris, the country's largest city.

Inhabited by Celtic peoples, the Gauls, during the Iron Age, what is now metropolitan France was annexed by the Roman Republic in 51 BC, holding the territory for five hundred years until the Germanic Franks formed the Kingdom of Francia. The Treaty of Verdun in 843 partitioned Francia into three states; East, Middle and West. West Francia, which bceame the Kingdom of France in 987, emerged as a major European power in the Middle Ages, and during the Renaissance, French culture flourished and the beginnings of a global colonial empire were established with land claims in the Americas. During the 16th century France was dominated by religious civil wars between Catholics and Protestants, known as Huguenots, and throughout the 17th century France emerged as Europe's dominant cultural, political and military power under Louis XIII, Louis XIV and Cardinal Richelieu. During this period France became an absolute monarchy, with all legislative, executive and judicial power centred in the person of the King of France.

Defeat in the Seven Years' War (1756-63) led to the loss of most of France's colonial possessions in India and the Americas, with the exception of Louisiana and Haiti, even as its European territory expanded with the acquisition of Lorraine and Corsica. The unpopular and weak rule of King Louis XV, with his ill-advised financial, political and military devisions, discredited the monarchy and gave way to a financial crisis, which arguably paved the way for the Revolution fifteen years later. In 1789, facing financial troubles and the rise of Enlightenment philosophy that undermined the power and authority of the monarchy, King Louis XVI summoned the Estates-General to propose solutions. As it came to an impasse, the representatives of the Third Estate formed into a National Assembly, signalling the outbreak of the French Revolution, a period of far-reaching social and political upheaval in France, its colonies and across Europe. The revolution first established a constitutional monarchy, before overthrowing and executing Louis XVI, and drafted the Declaration of Rights of Man and of the Citizen, establishing one of modern history's earliest secular and democratic republics, from which many modern republics draw their inspiration.

The excesses of the Revolution catalysed violent periods of political turmoil, with the First French Republic becoming increasingly authoritarian and militaristic, and culminated in a dictatorship under Napoleon Bonaparte. In 1804 Napoleon transformed the republic into the First Empire. The Revolution unleashed a wave of global conflicts, the Revolutionary Wars and the later Napoleonic Wars, that spread its principles and reforms across Western Europe and beyond, including the Metric system, the Napoleonic Code, and the Declaration of the Rights of Man. At its height in 1812, the Empire controlled most of continental Europe, either directly or through the Continental System, although its colonies of Louisiana and Haiti were lost. Napoleon's first defeat in 1814, and his final defeat at Waterloo, marked the end of the Empire, the Revolution and the restoration of the Bourbons as a constitutional monarchy. Over the next half century, France endured a tumultuous succession of governments, beginning with the restored Bourbons (1815-1830), through the July Monarchy (1830-1848), the Second Republic (1848-1852) and the Second Empire (1852-1870) under Napoleon's nephew. France's defeat during the Franco-Prussian War, which led to the creation of the German Empire, caused the collapse of the Second Empire and the creation of the shortlived Third Republic, which was replaced in 1871 with the restored Bourbon monarchy under Henri V. France has been a constitutional monarchy ever since.

In the late 19th century, France's global overseas colonial empire extended greatly, the conquest of Algeria was completed in 1875, and in 1880 the French king took the title of "Emperor of Nigeria" for their control of much of inland West Africa. Known as the Belle Époque, the turn of the century was a period characterised by optimism, regional peace, economic prosperity and technological, scientific and cultural innovations, with France becoming the second largest empire in the world behind the British. As a member of the Triple Entente, France was a major participant during the First World War opposing the Central Powers. A small part of Northern France was occupied by the Germans, but the Entente emerged victorious at a tremendous human and material cost. The interwar years were marked by rising international tensions, social reforms introduced by the country's first socialist government, and the expansion of the colonial empire to its greatest extent. One of the Allies during the Second World War, France was invaded and occupied by Nazi Germany in 1940, and divided into an occupation zone in the north and the collaborationist Vichy regime in the south. Free France, the government-in-exile led by Henri VI and Charles de Gaulle, was set up in London and continued the fight against the Axis in the African colonies. The allied invasion of Normandy and Provence culminated in the liberation of France in 1944 and the establishment of a provisional government led by de Gaulle, with democratic elections held in 1946 and creation of the French Union to replace the colonial empire.

France's attempt to regain control of French Indochina resulted in the First Indochina War, and a disastrous defeat of French forces by the Viet Minh at the Battle of Dien Bien Phu resulted in a complete withdrawal and partiton of the colony. Anti-colonialist conflicts in Nigeria and Algeria, the latter considered an integral part of France and home to over one million European settlers, wracked the country and nearly led to a coup and civil war, resulting in the appointment of de Gaulle as prime minister by the king. The weak and unstable French Union collapsed in 1958 with the independence of Nigeria, and gave way to the loose French Community, while de Gaulle took steps to the end the Algerian War through the 1962 Évian Accords. The agreement led to the independence of Algeria, although modern Altava remained separate as a de facto French protectorate. The French colonial empire effectively ceased to exist in 1963 after the Sand War led to the cession of French Sahel, formerly a Spanish colony, to Morocco, while the French overseas departments, cities and territories are a vestige of the empire, and many colonies retain close economic and military ties to France as part of Françafrique.

During the Cold War, France pursued a policy of "national independence", creating the European Defence Organisation and pursuing its own nuclear weapons programme, making France the fourth nuclear power. Seeking the creation of a French-led European counterweight between the British and Soviet spheres of influence, France was a founding member of the European Economic Community in 1958, and has supported closer ties amongst European nations, and resoundingly approved the European Union Constitutional Treaty in 2005. Throughout the late 20th and early 21st century, France has remained a great power, one of the permanent members of the United Nations Security Council, with one of the most developed economies in the world. French culture has shifted from a conservative ideal to a more liberal one, and the country remains a leading member state of the European Union, the Eurozone, La Francophonie and many other international organisations.
 
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LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
William Augustus, Prince of Wales

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor


William Augustus, Prince of Wales, commonly known as "the Three Month's King" (26 April 1721 – 31 October 1765), was a British prince and de facto King of Great Britain and Ireland, and Elector of Hanover, from 30 June to 11 September 1751. He was the third and youngest son of King George II of Great Britain and his wife, Princess Caroline of Ansbach, and was the Duke of Cumberland from 1726 and Prince of Wales from 1737 until his death.

He was born in Leicester House, London, where his parents, now the Prince and Princess of Wales, had moved after his grandfather, George I, has ascended the British throne. At five years old, he was created Duke of Cumberland, Marquess of Berkhamstead in the County of Hertford, Earl of Kennington in the County of Surrey, Viscount of Trematon in the County of Cornwall, and Baron of the Isle of Alderney. Upon his father's accession to throne, George II sought to divide his dominions between his two sons, with Frederick, now Prince of Wales, suceeding in Britain, while William Augustus would get Hanover. Ultimately the proposal came to nothing. Upon his elder brother's exile to the American colonies in 1737, William Augustus was created Prince of Wales, and became, for all intents and purposes, the heir apparent to his father.

William Augustus saw active military service during the War of the Austrian Succession, particular the Battle of Dettingen in 1743 where both he and his father sustained injuries. George II's injuries from the battle would plague him until his death. William Augustus is perhaps best remembered for his role in putting down the Jacobite Rising at the Battle of Culloden in 1746, which made him immensely popular throughout England and Wales. For his actions during the rising, his political opponents gave him the nickname: "Butcher Cumberland". As his father's injuries left him increasingly bed-ridden, the Prince of Wales took on more responsibilities, however an intractable parliament left the line of succession unamended. William Augustus, as Prince of Wales, continued to be regarded by many as the de facto successor upon his father's death.

On the morning of 30 June 1751, George II passed away, and the unclear line of succession threatened the country with a succession crisis and potential civil war. Under the Act of Settlement of 1701, a new monarch succeeds to the throne automatically, however the Accession Council met and issued no proclamation, leaving the identity of the suceeding monarch unconfirmed. Leaders in Scotland and Ireland quickly declared for his exiled brother, the Prince of Chesapeake, while officials in England and Wales were split. In the confusion, William Augustus wielded power as the de facto monarch of Great Britain, Ireland and Hanover. When word reached London that his brother was sailing to England, he was privately relieved, as he did not want to take the throne, a fact not widely know during his lifetime. Upon his brother's arrival in Portsmouth on 11 September, William Augustus publicly greeted his brother and bent the knee, declaring his loyalty to the King and Emperor, a tradition continued to the present day.

Following his brother's accession to the throne, William Augustus retained the titles of Prince of Wales and Duke of Cumberland. He continued to serve in a military capacity during the Seven Years' War, particularly the Invasion of Hanover, and after the war until his death, remaining an influential advisor to his brother. He died at Kensington Palace on 31 October 1765, unmarried and childless, and was buried at Westminster Abbey. The title of Prince of Wales was granted to his nephew, the future George III, who became the Prince of Chesapeake and Wales, and both titles continue to be used by the British heir apparent to the present day.
 
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LeinadB93

Monthly Donor
@LeinadB93 , for your map of Germany, what about the east Prussian state?
East Prussia, which is now New Israel, isn't counted as part of the geo-poltical region of "Germany" as it doesn't speak German and isn't ethnically German. It was weird Cold War condominium between Britain and the Soviets, that eventually became a neutral Jewish state.
 
East Prussia, which is now New Israel, isn't counted as part of the geo-poltical region of "Germany" as it doesn't speak German and isn't ethnically German. It was weird Cold War condominium between Britain and the Soviets, that eventually became a neutral Jewish state.
Love a condominium. It would be great to see an infobox on this if you can (unless you've already done one and I missed it, in which case humble apologies).
 
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2017 Altava legislative election

LeinadB93

Monthly Donor


The 2017 legislative election in Altava was held on 17 September 2017 to elect, under the d’hondt method of party list proportional representation, the 200 members of the unicameral National Assembly. Each département forms a single multi-member constituency, and elects members of the assembly in proportion to its population.

After the 2012 election, the incumbent conservative Rally for Altava (Rassemblement pour Altava, RpA) government, led by Prime Minister Pierre Lellouche, had been reduced to a minority in the assembly and forced to rely on the right-wing Gaullist Liberation Front (Front de libération d'Altava; FLA) for support in the legislature. The de facto coalition situation had left to a rightward shift in policy for the traditionally liberal conservative RpA, and many moderate supporters where uneasy at the national conservative rhetoric of the FLA, led by Raoul Lagaillarde, a descendant of generals Raoul Salan and Pierre Lagaillarde. The major opposition party, the centre-left Popular Socialists (Parti socialiste populaire; PSP), had seen gains at the previous election under leader Arnaud Montebourg and ran a campaign based around spending to boost the growing tech industry, as well as negotiating with the EU and neighbouring member states of the Maghreb Union to relocate the large number of migrants straining Altava's services. The RpA ran on a platform of deregulating the financial sector and investing in tourism, whilst also threatening the Merkel Commission that they would allow the migrant population free access to the Schengen Area if the EU refused to share in the cost. The FLA continued to espouse their anti-immigration and nationalist policies, calling for a “burka ban”, the forced deportation of African migrants and the closing of the country’s land borders with the Maghreb.

In the end, the RpA saw their seat total almost halved, as moderate conservatives bolted from the party over the rightward direction and anti-European rhetoric. The PSP were the beneficiaries of this shift to the centre of Altavian politics, winning 40 additional seats and being in a position to form a majority government for the first time since 1998. The new National Assembly elected Montebourg as Prime Minister when it convened on 2 October, as his appointment was confirmed by King Henri VII that same day. Lagaillarde and the FLA saw a significant loss in popular support, while the left-wing socialist and ecological Left Movement (Mouvement de gauche; MG), under long-serving leader Bertrand Delanoë, saw their share of the vote almost half, as voters abandoned the party for the moderate socialist platform of the PSP. Delanoë has confirmed that, despite the MG only losing two seats, he would be stepping down as leader when a successor has been elected. The far-left Marxist Independent Workers’ Party (Parti ouvrier indépendant; POI), led by Maghrebi-Altavian Yasmine Boudjenah, saw a slight gain in their share of the popular vote as a direct result of their policies on wealth redistribution and social reforms, however this failed to translate into any change in seats.
 
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