Hail, Britannia

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by LeinadB93, Jul 30, 2017.

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  1. Arthur Marston Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2019
    What would the Empire's automotive industry look like?

    IOTL, American (and to a lesser extent, Canadian) automotive tastes historically trended towards big cars with big engines and soft handling, a product of low gas prices and America's extensive highway system which encouraged emphasis on long-haul comfort. Britain, by contrast, generally tends to prefer smaller cars with more responsive handling.
     
  2. gunnerkite Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 5, 2013
    Location:
    Sheffield, England, British Empire
    I'd imagine a bit of a combination of the two but leaning towards the American style I'd guess. Certainly in most uke countries like North America,, Australia and the liege,with the British isles tending to the smaller side as they have to get around places not designed for cars... especially wide ones!

    It's a shame this now seems dead. I've been enjoying this immensely... especially given the current state of uk politics!
     
  3. MatthewFirth Well-Known Member

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    Mar 12, 2012
    Location:
    Portsmouth, England
    Thanks for keeping the thread alive without asking the obvious questions...
     
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  4. Arthur Marston Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2019
    Here's what I think it'd be like.

    Using General Motors cars as examples, a typical UE automaker's lineup in 1973-the last year before the OPEC embargo-would look something like this.
    [​IMG]
    Full-size (OTL US mid-size segment)
    [​IMG]
    Mid-size (OTL compact(US)/executive car(UK) segment)
    [​IMG]
    Compact (OTL subcompact(US)/large family car(UK) segment)
    [​IMG]
    Subcompact (OTL small family car segment)

    Now for the present day, I'd assume it'd look something like this.
    [​IMG]
    Full-size
    [​IMG]
    Mid-size
    [​IMG]
    Compact
    [​IMG]
    Subcompact
    [​IMG]
    City car
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2019
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  5. AlexVonWolfstein Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    But, I do live in the UK though, born and bred Yorkshireman XD

    I have just always disliked how the education in the UK is. I just found it did not benefit anyone much, especially from my own experience which is why I altered it a tad.

    Having said that, I did love my 6th form, I just think having 4 years there instead of two seems better.
     
    Last edited: Mar 18, 2019
  6. AlexVonWolfstein Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    *Alt Historical brain implodes*

    But, without the colonies becoming independent, France would not fall into a revolution so soon fro bankruptcy from assisting the colonists, which would lead to a more than likely outcome of France becoming a constitutional monarchy, thus never allowing Napoleon to rise.

    This would also mean Germany would not merge into larger German States due to Napoleon's influence.
     
  7. Indicus Stuff

    Joined:
    Aug 1, 2014
    Location:
    Torontum, Ontarium Minor, Imperium Romanum
    I must state that I disagree with the analysis that delaying France's massive financial chaos by a few years (a decade at most, France was at breaking point with or without the ARW) would magically make the absolutist Louis XVI accept being reduced massively in power. I'm inclined to think France would still become a republic, since after all those ideas were already in the air and an obstinate king and aristocracy would exist in any case.

    Secondly, if you see the first post of this thread, you will see that this TL has many, many PODs and is stated to be on the Type II and Type III scenario on the Sliding Scale of Alternate History Plausibility. So, none of this really matters. Take this for what it is - a cool worldbuilding project with cool graphics.
     
  8. AlexVonWolfstein Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    I am unsure about that, there were so much that was plausible. But yes, the revolution would not have happened as quickly as it did. With the French not supporting the colonists financially, it would not lead to an instant collapse.
    I highly recommend AltHistoryHub on YouTube, his debriefs into the possible scenarios take a lot of aspects into account.

    I am trying, but it does cause some historical/alt-historical conflict with me.
     
  9. Arthur Marston Well-Known Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    Given how the First Treaty of Fontainebleau never happens ITTL, one would expect the French monarchy to implode sooner than OTL. IIRC, France was flat broke after the Seven Years' War, and the sale of Louisiana to Spain helped alleviate some of the financial pressure.
     
  10. AlexVonWolfstein Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    Ahhh, this does make sense.
     
  11. AlexVonWolfstein Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    Sorry, I'm just really interested in this, and as a writer myself, wanting to know more about a world that is fascinating.

    So, could we know more about Japan, and especially how the gaming and animation industry has developed (Anyone seen Code Geass? XD)

    Secondly, I would love to see some profiles on what would have been the American Founders (Washington and crew) and how they fared, as well as Admiral Nelson, Duke of Wellington and Teddy Roosevelt (surprised he never became PM actually).
    Even going into if and how the UKE as a whole fought during the "Napoleonic" wars.

    Finally, what is the status of hunting, animal and wildlife preservation as well as the environmental goals of the UKE?
     
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  12. Arthur Marston Well-Known Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    Leinad wrote a profile on George Washington before making this thread. Teddy Roosevelt was First Minister of Columbia twice (1907-11, 1913-16).
     
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  13. Arthur Marston Well-Known Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    On the contrary, I think the case for using nuclear weapons would be much stronger than OTL. Having a larger population than Japan, China would have a lot more men to throw at the Allies. It should be self-evident that an invasion would result in a massive body count for both sides, way beyond even the most pessimistic predictions for OTL Operation Downfall.
     
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  14. RMcD94 Well-Known Member

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    Feb 20, 2010
    Location:
    Dominion of Scotland, Imperial Commonwealth
    There is no UK education system.

    The education system is very different in the constituent countries, even including university degrees.
     
  15. AlexVonWolfstein Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    This is true, but there are similarities between the Scottish, English&Welsh, and NI education systems. In fact, the ages are still the same throughout the UK.
     
  16. sarahz Well-Known Member

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    Nov 5, 2013
    Hell even counties like Kent haven't had uniform systems especially with various permutations of selecting for the 11 or is it 13 this year in this area, plus.
     
  17. Threadmarks: Texan Border Wars

    LeinadB93 Just Leinad

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2013
    Location:
    God's Own County
    So I'm back!! Sorry for the long absence, real life problems, work etc.

    I intend to respond to everyone's questions in due course.

    But first a little update:

    [​IMG]

    The Texan Border Wars were a series of disputes and armed conflicts in what was the northern provinces of Mexico, between the breakaway republics of Texas and Rio Grande, and the forces of the Centralist Republic of Mexico. The disputes had their origins in the Texas Revolution, which had established Texas as a de facto independent nation under British protection, although Texas also claimed the Mexican province of New Mexico, and the formation of the Republic of the Rio Grande in 1840. The wars lasted intermittently for nearly five years, resulting in the de facto Texan annexation of New Mexico, and contributed directly to the outbreak of war between Mexico and the British Empire in 1846.

    Historians generally agree that the border wars began with a government sponsored expedition to Santa Fe to secure the region for Texas, which began on 19 June 1841. The expedition, which was accompanied by British American volunteers under Stephen Kearny, was initiated by the then President of Texas, Mirabeau B. Lamar, in an attempt to gain control over the lucrative Santa Fe Trail and further develop the trade links between Texas and New Mexico. The initiative was a major component of Lamar's ambitious plan to turn the fledgling republic into a continental power. Upon arriving in Santa Fe in September 1841, the expedition found an ill-equipped and unprepared detachment of the Mexican Army led by the governor of New Mexico, Manuel Armijo, who promptly surrendered the town to the Texans. The Mexican troops were allowed to keep their weapons, and guaranteed safe passage and an escort to the Mexican border. Although some soldiers would make the 2,000 mile march to Mexico City, many remained to fight a guerrilla war against the Texans which continued in the hinterlands of New Mexico until 1848.

    South of the Rio Grande River, the Republic of the Rio Grande had acted as a buffer against any direct Mexican invasions into its northern neighbour. However the southern republic had suffered numerous raids and invasions by forces aligned to the Mexican central government, which had significantly weakened the nation. The decisive Battle of Saltillo on 25 October 1843 brought about the end of the Rio Grande Republic, as Mexican forces under General Rafael Vasquez defeated the remaining Rio Grande militia. Shortly after the defeat, General Antonio Canales surrendered to Mexican forces and President Jesús de Cárdenas sought refuge in San Antonio, marking an end to the southern republic. In early 1844, emboldened by the collapse of the Republic of the Rio Grande, Franco-Mexican commander Adrián Woll began a coordinated campaign to invade and retake Texas. In August 1844 an expedition led by Rafael Vasquez captured San Antonio and took the city from an insignificant Texan force without a fight, whilst forces under Pedro de Ampudia launched numerous raids across southern Texas, specifically the Nueces strip, from their base in Ciudad Mier.

    In September 1844, Mexican forces under Adrián Woll arrived in San Antonio and held the city for two months until they were routed from Texas at the Battle of Salado Creek. Texan forces pursued the Mexicans to the Rio Grande, resulting in the Battle of the Arroyo Hondo between Texas Rangers and the retreating Mexicans, but the Mexicans retreated across the border. Despite the retreat of the Mexicans from Texan territory, raids and small-scale invasions would continue for the next year. The final distinct engagement in the border wars began in November 1845, when an expedition of 700 men left San Antonio with the intention of retaking Laredo and advancing on the Mexican base at Ciudad Mier. On 20 December 1845, the expeditions approached Ciudad Mier, unaware of the 3,000 Mexican troops in the area outnumbering them ten to one. Despite inflicting heavy casualties on the Mexicans, the Texans were forced to surrender, and 243 Texans were taken prisoner and marched to Mexico City. An escape attempt in February 1846 saw 181 Texans escape, but 176 surrendered or were recaptured and ordered to be executed by Santa Anna. The resulting "Black Bean Episode" saw 17 Texans executed on 25 March 1846, whilst the remaining prisoners were held by Mexico until the 1848 Treaty of Toluca.

    Tensions continued between Texas and Mexico until 25 April 1846, when a Mexican force crossed the disputed border along the Rio Grande and engaged a British-Texan force, killing 12 men and taking 52 prisoners. The incident, known as the Thornton Ambush, resulted in the British Empire declaring war on the Centralist Republic of Mexico, and marked the beginning of the Mexican War.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 30, 2019
  18. Arthur Marston Well-Known Member

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    Mar 11, 2019
    Aww, hell yeah, it's back!:extremelyhappy:
     
  19. Tethys00 Mod of r/imaginarymaps Donor

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    Apr 24, 2018
    Location:
    Great Salt Lake City, The Republic of Deseret
    HE HAS RETURNED
     
  20. Analytical Engine Monarchist Collectivist Federalist

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    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    UK, EU (for the moment), Earth
    Hail, Britannia!
     
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