Laughin' Place: Redefining Disney

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by HeX, Oct 18, 2018.

Loading...
  1. GTStinger Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Prince Valiant got me thinking about other print comics that were never made into Hollywood productions or weren’t until much later.

    What other newspaper comics that were very popular in this time period have potential?

    Heathcliff
    Garfield
    Marmaduke
    Ziggy
    BC
    Family Circus
    Doonesbury (If sombody wants an animated movie not aimed at kids.)
     
  2. unclepatrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Location:
    Huntsville Al
    Other options , Terry and the Pirates, The Sprit, and Godzilla
     
    GTStinger likes this.
  3. GTStinger Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Great option to get grandparents bringing grandkids to the theater.
     
  4. unclepatrick Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 6, 2009
    Location:
    Huntsville Al
    Would be a good choice after the success of Raiders of the Lost Ark. A adventure story that takes place in the 1930's.
     
    GTStinger likes this.
  5. Unknown Member

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Location:
    Corpus Christi, TX
    An interesting fact: according to tvtropes.org, after the opening of Walt Disney World , the Miami tourism board placed ads in some Northern newspapers encouraging visitors to come to Miami because it was "just down the road from Disney World." And, yes, it is true, if the road means US-441 (aka the Florida Turnpike), and "just down" means 234 miles and nearly 3 and a half hours to get there (and probably more, if we're going by speed limits in the 1970s-1980s; maybe 5 to 6 hours)…

    Talk about stretching the truth until it breaks...
     
  6. GTStinger Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 10, 2012
    Quick wiki search shows the creator of Terry and the Pirates lived until 1988 and two of the radio voices used for Terry lived until 2002 and 2014.
     
    unclepatrick likes this.
  7. eldandythedoubter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2015
    Other suggestions for Universal to take on ittl.

     
  8. PNWKing There's Still Hope Out There!

    Joined:
    Oct 19, 2016
    Universal should do an animated Sherlock Holmes.
     
    unclepatrick likes this.
  9. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Location:
    Santa Marta,Magdalena,West Venezuela
    The latter, Fucking Enix decided to make a videogame about that over bringing terranigma....
     
  10. eldandythedoubter Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2015
    Agreed. Enix didn't even get the song right in the intro for the game, yet still managed to put in the work for the rest of the soundtrack. JUST LISTEN TO THIS:
     
  11. Threadmarks: The Fifty-Second Academy Awards, 1980

    HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    The Fifty-Second Academy Awards came on the heels of a great year of filmmaking. The idea of a 'blockbuster' had been heating up ever since Jaws debuted in 1975, and 1979 proved itself to have had many movies in that category. Francis Ford Coppola's Apocalypse Now narrowly won the award for Best Picture over highly-reviewed biopic Kramer vs. Kramer--in fact, Kramer was shafted multiple times to many different films, chiefly Apocalypse Now (three awards) and Raiders of the Lost Ark (six awards). The event was also a landmark year in animation, it being the first time the award for Best Animated Feature was given to another studio but Disney, with Universal's Woody Woodpecker easily stomping all over non-existent competition.

    The Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences faced an interesting dilemma in the aftermath of the ceremony. Many in Hollywood and around the world were infuriated that a 'children's movie' like Raiders could have done so well. This, compounded with the intense pushback in 1978 over the award of Best Director to George Lucas for Star Wars, led to a divide in the Academy on the topic of quality to be found in action-adventure movies like Raiders or science-fantasy like Star Wars or Alien. This would come back in just one year to almost destroy the Academy's credibility in one spectacular backfire when, at the 53rd Oscars, they sidestepped one non-traditional film and caused nationwide--and industry-wide--outrage...

    Awards Won at the 52nd Academy Awards

    Best Picture:
    Apocalypse Now
    Best Director: Steven Spielberg and George Lucas, Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Best Actor: Harrison Ford, Raiders of the Lost Ark
    Best Actress: Sally Field, Norma Rae
    Best Supporting Actor: Melvyn Douglas, Being There
    Best Supporting Actress: Meryl Streep, Kramer vs. Kramer
    Best Original Screenplay: Breaking Away, Steve Tesich
    Best Screenplay Adapted from Other Material: Apocalypse Now, Francis Ford Coppola/John Milius and Joseph Conrad
    Best Animated Feature: Woody Woodpecker, Gary Goldman and John Pomeroy
    Best Animated Short Film: Every Child, Derek Lamb
    Best Documentary Feature: Best Boy, Ira Wohl
    Best Documentary Short Subject: Paul Robeson: Tribute to an Artist, Saul J. Turell
    Best Live Action Short Film: Board and Care, Sarah Pillsbury and Ron Ellis
    Best Original Score: Raiders of the Lost Ark, John Williams
    Best Adaptation Score: All That Jazz, Ralph Burns
    Best Original Song: "Rainbow Connection," The Muppets Movie, Paul Williams and Kenny Ascher
    Best Sound: Raiders of the Lost Ark, Bill Varney, Steve Maslow, Gregg Landaker, and Roy Charman
    Best Foreign Language Film: The Tin Drum, West Germany
    Best Costume Design: All That Jazz, Albert Wolsky
    Best Art Direction: Raiders of the Lost Ark, Norman Reynolds, Leslie Dilley, Michael Ford
    Best Cinematography: Apocalypse Now, Vittorio Storaro
    Best Visual Effects: Alien, H.R. Giger, Carlo Rambaldi, Brian Johnson, Nick Allder, and Dennis Ayling
    Best Film Editing: Raiders of the Lost Ark, Michael Kahn

    --------------------------------
    Walt Disney Studios, Burbank, CA
    April 18, 1980


    Osamu Tezuka gazed up at the sight of the Mickey Mouse-emblazoned watertower that dominated the Burbank skyline. The flight from Tokyo to Los Angeles had been abominable--ten hours in an enclosed metal capsule without sleep wasn't fun, no matter how much legroom you had--but here he was, with two of his most promising new recruits: nineteen-year-old college dropout Masanori Ota, and twenty-six-year-old Katsuhiro Otomo.

    "You know, if Astro Boy becomes as famous as Mickey Mouse, we could get our own water tower like that," quipped Ota.

    Tezuka shrugged. "And what would the advantage to that be? We already have indoor plumbing and water in every part of the studio."

    "Bragging rights," stated Otomo.

    As the three Japanese animators stepped onto Dopey Drive, the whole demeanor of the world changed. No more did it feel like Burbank, California, home to some of the world's greatest filmmaking studios; it felt more like a dreamworld come to life, bending to one rule and one rule alone: there were no rules. A man in a Roman chariot pulled by a horse roared past, hollering to get out of the way. A purple animatronic dragon, a ram clutching an old-timey explosives plunger in its teeth, and a variety of pirates all loaded in a trailer was being towed by a pickup truck in the opposite direction. Someone holding a large art folder screamed as the wind picked up, blew the folder open, and scattered their drawings and computer-generated renderings everywhere.

    "It's chaos!" exclaimed Otomo.

    "I don't know about that. I'd say it's more like... controlled chaos. Walt doesn't care how things get done, as long as they get done right," said Tezuka.

    His employees nodded. "Definitely not how we would do it in Japan," mused Ota, "but if it works out, well..."

    After a bit of blind stumbling, Tezuka and the others managed to get directions up to Walt's office. There, the man himself sat in his desk chair, swiveled in the wrong direction, towards a television set showing a black-and-white cartoon. He spoke, addressing the group but with his focus still on the TV. "You know, Tezuka-san, I can't quite understand why Eastern animation has had to wait this long to hop the Pacific. Some of the ideas and plotlines are admittedly a bit strange, and it'll probably take Western audiences a bit to warm up to it all... but other than that, this is just another way to tell a story."

    Tezuka looked closer, and noticed that Walt wasn't watching just any anime, but his anime. The 1963 version of Astro Boy, to be specific. "I'm flattered you think so," he replied.

    Walt switched off the television and spun to face the trio. "Do any of you have any guesses as to why I called you all here?"

    Tezuka gulped. "Um... I hope it's good news."

    Walt suddenly broke into a grin. "It's very good news! I've just watched the old Astro Boy cartoons. This is my third time through, actually. And I just have to say, I love it. If the remake is anything as excellent as this--and I think it'll be better--then we'll be needing more anime on the Disney Channel, ASAP. That's what I called you here for, and, for the record," continued Walt, turning to Masanori Ota and Katsuhiro Otomo, "I told him to bring his two best idea-makers along, too."

    Both men seemed to suddenly take an interest in their shoes, faces red with pride and embarassment.

    "Anyways, what have you got? Give me the first ideas off the tops of your heads, you two," he demanded.

    Ota spoke up first. "Um, I had this idea for... sort of a retelling of the Titanomachy, the war between the gods and Titans in Greek mythology, but told in the future, and with androids in place of the gods and goddesses."

    "Boom," said Walt. "Just like that, you've got one, maybe two seasons of a TV show. And there's so much more to build off of, too."

    "I've got a concept that's a bit more fleshed out than his, sir," offered Otomo.

    Walt held up a hand. "Please, call me Walt. We don't do 'sirs' or 'madams' around here."

    The writer nodded. "Apologies. My story takes place sometime in the future, after a nuclear holocaust. In the ruins of Tokyo, a young man awakens some psychic powers, and from there there are some big problems with gang wars, terrorism, the Olympic Games... maybe some of the violence can be tuned down, but I won't do it in a way that will compromise my vision."

    "Of course. Artistic integrity always comes first," responded Walt.

    Suddenly, the phone rang. Walt answered, and his expression fell. He stood, and said, "I'm very sorry, but I've got an emergency at home. The dog's not doing too well, and my wife loves the thing, and... well, I have to go. But I'll be back soon! Just make yourselves at home. We still have much to discuss."
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
  12. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Location:
    Santa Marta,Magdalena,West Venezuela
    Hey is fire emblem old animator, years i hear from him
     
  13. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    Yup. He also created Ghost in the Shell IOTL...
     
    Narissa and Nivek like this.
  14. Nivek Resident Videogame Expert

    Joined:
    May 4, 2009
    Location:
    Santa Marta,Magdalena,West Venezuela
    Yeah since that and his fire emblem work, he just have been very quiet...besides his non safe for work other works i will not name...
     
    HeX likes this.
  15. PunMaster Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 12, 2016
    Hot damn, not just Astro Boy but Akira and Ghost In The Shell too? All with support from Walt Disney himself? This will definitely be interesting to see play out. Also, I love how they all reacted to the wonderful, crazy world of Disney and how different it was from anything they knew.
     
    GJohn902 and HeX like this.
  16. Kalvan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    Did I read that right? That was either Fist of the North Star or Piers Anthony's Battle Circle as an early Disney Channel show.

    Hmm... Right now, a certain someone's breakout project has just recently gained him fortune and fame, and sealed the name of Sunrise Studio forever as a synonym, if not quite homonym, for quality animated storytelling, and it just so happens that the premise of the plot (a fifteen year-old boy is stuck in the cockpit of an advanced combat prototype machine at the outbreak of war in space) with its Boy's Own sensibility, combined with its intended message of war as a wicked necessity (with frequent emphasis on the wicked part) would be just the thing to catch Walt's eye.

    Of course, Tomino Yoshiyuki's next project after this is Invincible Robo Tryder G7, which arguably went the exact other way in tone, but that's good too. Not so sure Disney would want to bring over Armored Trooper VOTOMS or Aura Battler Dunbine, but Giant Gorg, Panzer World Galliant, and Mashin Hero Wataru should each be right up Walt's alley.

    And of course, with more and better examples of combat vehicle anime around than just Robotech, Starvengers, Ronin Warriors, and Tranzor Z, there will be more and better responses than just the likes of Robotix and Zoids, especially if the toys and model kits the shows were meant to sell don't come over for a ride, too. Who knows; we just might get Megas XLR twenty years early.

    Speaking of which will the Freling-DePattie Marvel animation end up doing the OTL Marvel-Sunbow shows with Hasbro, Takara, and Toei, and have we just butterflied away The Lion King?
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2019
    PunMaster and Nivek like this.
  17. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    The two shows are going to be Black Magic (Shirow) and Akira (Otomo), both of which will not be appearing as manga ITTL but rather as original animes. Eventually, their other works (including Ghost in the Shell) will be made into movies or TV shows as a joint venture between Disney and Tezuka.

    Paramount will also see Astro Boy taking off, so they might be interested in bringing some mechs over to the PTS.

    That's largely up in the air, some of those shows/toy lines might be butterflied.

    The Lion King has been butterflied since Walt quit smoking. With Don Bluth in charge of animation, and Walt still alive and heavily influencing everything that comes in and out of his studio, basically every animated movie past the 1970s has been butterflied, radically altered, or placed sooner/later on the TL (this situation mostly being what OTL Disney Princess movies find themselves in, as it's almost a no-brainer to make something like a Rapunzel movie but when it comes along is anyone's guess). Though, since a large portion of Disney's output is made by adapting and/or reimagining previous works for the silver screen, some familiar faces will be showing up still.
     
    Nevermore, PunMaster and Narissa like this.
  18. scretchy Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Oct 15, 2015
    ealry adoption of anime by walt disney sounds so good. I dont believe that he would botch a dub to much. I hope the trend of renaming things never catches on.
     
    HeX likes this.
  19. HeX Self-Proclaimed Disney Expert

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2018
    Location:
    Disneyland, U.S.A.
    There's likely to be some renaming of things in the early days, especially names of characters, I think, when shows are localized for the US. The logic will be that Western-sounding names will interest more Westerners, or at least not turn them off with a name they can't pronounce very well.
     
    Kalvan likes this.
  20. Kalvan Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 28, 2010
    I just realized something.

    That's Naitô Shirô, and he's a stone's throw away from Disneyland!

    Does this mean that this time around, it's Bravestarr that gets accused of being a plagiarism of Trigun rather than vice versa?
     
Loading...