Arrix85

Donor
In the pause between update I keep on rereading everything, it is an amazing writing work, on one of my preferred PoD
After reading this I've started another re-read. It's your fault :openedeyewink:

Sometimes I just think about Venetians in Egypt (and India), Sicilians in Tunisia and Sardinians in East Asia (don't know why, probably the Silk production in Piedmont)
 
After reading this I've started another re-read. It's your fault :openedeyewink:

Sometimes I just think about Venetians in Egypt (and India), Sicilians in Tunisia and Sardinians in East Asia (don't know why, probably the Silk production in Piedmont)
As a matter of fact, the cultivation of mulberry trees and the breeding of silkworm was quite common in the countryside of Piedmont and Lombardy. It was a traditional side business for farmers, and production of raw silk thread and twisted silk thread increased in the first half of 19th century. It has been estimated that around middle 19th century
150,000 people were seasonally employed, distributed over 700-800 workshops. The weaving of silk was also a traditional Italian industry, but its importance had plummeted starting in the 17th century, due to competition from France and the Low Countries.
Unfortunately, the 1850s will also see the spread of Pébrine, a disease cause by a protozoan microsporidian parasite which affects the silkworms, inhibiting the production of silk thread. While this infestation was fought by importing silkworm eggs (mainly from Japan), the short terms results were quite negative.
A brief history of silk industry in Italy can be found here:

On the subject of other diseases spreading in Europe in 19th century, the Late Blight, affecting potatoes and tomatoes as well as other nightshade, has already happened, and was the cause of hard famine in Ireland and other places when it caused the failure of potato crops (apparently the low temperatures in the second half of the 1840s contributed to the spread of this disease); the Peronospora (downy mildew) is going to hit France in thirty years or so, and will threaten the wine industry all over the continent.
 
Hi guys! Here's a teaser for you to start the week.
Enjoy! :) :)

The End of the Beginning
Part 4: When in the Romagne...

Verona, Guardia Nuova - 12 May 1848, Early Morning


Count Cavour and Marquis D'Azeglio were admitted together to the study of Prince Ferdinando.

"Good morning, gentlemen, and welcome to Verona, Marquis" Ferdinando's mood was buoyant "My warmest congratulation for a job well done in the Romagne: from all reports I received, the transfer of power in the former Legations was as smooth as I hoped."

"Thank you, Your Highness, however Cardinal d'Amat was cooperative, and Brigadier Bonomi was very effective. This said, there were some disturbances in Rimini and Faenza. A legacy of the harsh repression after the insurrection of 1845, no doubt. The National Guard had no great difficulty in restoring law and order."

"I have already sent a commendation to Brigadier Bonomi. Where is Cardinal d'Amat now? I understand he left Bologna."

"The cardinal told me he was going to the abbey of Nonantola, near Modena, for a spiritual retreat. I have been told that also Cardinal Falconieri, the archbishop of Ravenna, decided to join him. I can assure you that no pressure was exerted on either Cardinal, and their decision was freely taken."

"Nonantola is close to Modena, and so not far away from Bologna. Is there any danger of ecclesiastical interference in the former Legations?" Cavour had his priorities, and was not shy in asking questions.

"I do not anticipate any problem from either of them: Card. d'Amat was frankly relieved when he stepped down from his position, and Card. Falconieri has always been considered a moderate reformist. The emphasis is on "moderate": it has been said that he considered the reforms granted by the Pope a bit excessive. " D'Azeglio smiled sarcastically "Overall, I believe he may have just decided to remove himself from his seat, and weather the storm in a monastery (1)."

"Now be so kind to give us a brief analysis of the situation in the Romagne: we have obviously read your reports, but I would like to hear your views, as the man in the field. What do the people want, and are they united or divided about the way to go forward?"

"Your Highness, the delegates to the Convention of Imola were all in agreement about one point: the Romagne will cut their ties to Rome, at once and for good. The are historical as well as economical reasons for this, and it would be useless to rehash them.
Anyway, once the severance of the ties with the Papal States was voted, it was time to decide how the new state would be set up, and here the differences started to surface. The majority of the delegates was in favor of a constitutional monarchy, while there was a vocal minority advocating a republic: the former were handicapped by the lack of a suitable recipient for the future crown, the latter by knowing that they would be unable to be supported by a majority of the citizens, in particular in the countryside. In the end a compromise was reached: the new state would have monarchical form, and Your Highness would be offered the crown to Romagne, in Personal Union and subject to your acceptance of a Constitution to be written by an ad-hoc constitutional convention. I have a sneaking suspicion that the republican faction voted in favor of this compromise, with their fingers crossed: they hope that you will decline the offer, or alternatively that the Constitution to be written would be unacceptable to you. In either case, they believe that the republican option would be revived."
 
Hi guys! Here's a teaser for you to start the week.
Enjoy! :) :)

The End of the Beginning
Part 4: When in the Romagne...

Verona, Guardia Nuova - 12 May 1848, Early Morning


Count Cavour and Marquis D'Azeglio were admitted together to the study of Prince Ferdinando.

"Good morning, gentlemen, and welcome to Verona, Marquis" Ferdinando's mood was buoyant "My warmest congratulation for a job well done in the Romagne: from all reports I received, the transfer of power in the former Legations was as smooth as I hoped."

"Thank you, Your Highness, however Cardinal d'Amat was cooperative, and Brigadier Bonomi was very effective. This said, there were some disturbances in Rimini and Faenza. A legacy of the harsh repression after the insurrection of 1845, no doubt. The National Guard had no great difficulty in restoring law and order."

"I have already sent a commendation to Brigadier Bonomi. Where is Cardinal d'Amat now? I understand he left Bologna."

"The cardinal told me he was going to the abbey of Nonantola, near Modena, for a spiritual retreat. I have been told that also Cardinal Falconieri, the archbishop of Ravenna, decided to join him. I can assure you that no pressure was exerted on either Cardinal, and their decision was freely taken."

"Nonantola is close to Modena, and so not far away from Bologna. Is there any danger of ecclesiastical interference in the former Legations?" Cavour had his priorities, and was not shy in asking questions.

"I do not anticipate any problem from either of them: Card. d'Amat was frankly relieved when he stepped down from his position, and Card. Falconieri has always been considered a moderate reformist. The emphasis is on "moderate": it has been said that he considered the reforms granted by the Pope a bit excessive. " D'Azeglio smiled sarcastically "Overall, I believe he may have just decided to remove himself from his seat, and weather the storm in a monastery (1)."

"Now be so kind to give us a brief analysis of the situation in the Romagne: we have obviously read your reports, but I would like to hear your views, as the man in the field. What do the people want, and are they united or divided about the way to go forward?"

"Your Highness, the delegates to the Convention of Imola were all in agreement about one point: the Romagne will cut their ties to Rome, at once and for good. The are historical as well as economical reasons for this, and it would be useless to rehash them.
Anyway, once the severance of the ties with the Papal States was voted, it was time to decide how the new state would be set up, and here the differences started to surface. The majority of the delegates was in favor of a constitutional monarchy, while there was a vocal minority advocating a republic: the former were handicapped by the lack of a suitable recipient for the future crown, the latter by knowing that they would be unable to be supported by a majority of the citizens, in particular in the countryside. In the end a compromise was reached: the new state would have monarchical form, and Your Highness would be offered the crown to Romagne, in Personal Union and subject to your acceptance of a Constitution to be written by an ad-hoc constitutional convention. I have a sneaking suspicion that the republican faction voted in favor of this compromise, with their fingers crossed: they hope that you will decline the offer, or alternatively that the Constitution to be written would be unacceptable to you. In either case, they believe that the republican option would be revived."

Yeah, this is a bit of a dilemma: if Ferdinando accepts, that'd make him the head of state of three different countries in the Confederation, and that'd be a bit too much; if he refuses, the republican faction might try to have it their way while not being supported by most people. There might be the possibility of the convention doing what the Sicilian parliament did however, offering a crown to a noblewoman of proven devotion to the cause...

CRISTINA-TRIVULZIO-DI-BELGIOIOSO.jpg
 
Yeah, this is a bit of a dilemma: if Ferdinando accepts, that'd make him the head of state of three different countries in the Confederation, and that'd be a bit too much; if he refuses, the republican faction might try to have it their way while not being supported by most people. There might be the possibility of the convention doing what the Sicilian parliament did however, offering a crown to a noblewoman of proven devotion to the cause...
You know I do love cutting off the story on a cliffhanger :D
Ferdinando will have to make up his own mind, and I am fully confident he will make the right decision :)
As a matter of fact, there are a few other potential candidates, but I believe just one of them would be suitable (it shouldn't be too difficult to put a name to him).

Who is the lady? Mind, it's just innocent curiosity on my side: no chance for her to be crowned.
 
You know I do love cutting off the story on a cliffhanger :D
Ferdinando will have to make up his own mind, and I am fully confident he will make the right decision :)
As a matter of fact, there are a few other potential candidates, but I believe just one of them would be suitable (it shouldn't be too difficult to put a name to him).

Who is the lady? Mind, it's just innocent curiosity on my side: no chance for her to be crowned.

Cristina Trivulzio di Belgiojoso, of course - since she's quite close to a queen whose mere mention is enough to make bishops want to bathe in holy water, the possibility of the two heads of state bouncing dangerously progressive ideas back and forth through their mutual exchange of letters would be quite the entertaining sight. :p
 
Cristina Trivulzio di Belgiojoso, of course - since she's quite close to a queen whose mere mention is enough to make bishops want to bathe in holy water, the possibility of the two heads of state bouncing dangerously progressive ideas back and forth through their mutual exchange of letters would be quite the entertaining sight. :p
Quite an unflattering portrait. Anyway, we have already discussed this idea in the past, and the same considerations are still applicable: she wouldn't like the position, her marital situation is very iffy and she has just a daughter whose paternity is dubious, there are no connections between her and Romagne
 

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Narrative Interlude #54: The End of the Beginning-Part 4
The End of the Beginning
Part 4: When in the Romagne...


Verona, Guardia Nuova - 12 May 1848, Early Morning


Count Cavour and Marquis D'Azeglio were admitted together to the study of Prince Ferdinando.

"Good morning, gentlemen, and welcome to Verona, Marquis" Ferdinando's mood was buoyant "My warmest congratulation for a job well done in the Romagne: from all reports I received, the transfer of power in the former Legations was as smooth as I hoped."

"Thank you, Your Highness, however Cardinal d'Amat was cooperative, and Brigadier Bonomi was very effective. This said, there were some disturbances in Rimini and Faenza. A legacy of the harsh repression after the insurrection of 1845, no doubt. The National Guard had no great difficulty in restoring law and order."

"I have already sent a commendation to Brigadier Bonomi. Where is Cardinal d'Amat now? I understand he left Bologna."

"The cardinal told me he was going to the abbey of Nonantola, near Modena, for a spiritual retreat. I have been told that also Cardinal Falconieri, the archbishop of Ravenna, decided to join him. I can assure you that no pressure was exerted on either Cardinal, and their decision was freely taken."

"Nonantola is close to Modena, and so not far away from Bologna. Is there any danger of ecclesiastical interference in the former Legations?" Cavour had his priorities, and was not shy in asking questions.

"I do not anticipate any problem from either of them: Card. d'Amat was frankly relieved when he stepped down from his position, and Card. Falconieri has always been considered a moderate reformist. The emphasis is on "moderate": it has been said that he considered the reforms granted by the Pope a bit excessive. " D'Azeglio smiled sarcastically "Overall, I believe he may have just decided to remove himself from his seat, and weather the storm in a monastery (1)."

"Now be so kind to give us a brief analysis of the situation in the Romagne: we have obviously read your reports, but I would like to hear your views, as the man in the field. What do the people want, and are they united or divided about the way to go forward?"

"Your Highness, the delegates to the Convention of Imola were all in agreement about one point: the Romagne will cut their ties to Rome, at once and for good. The are historical as well as economical reasons for this, and it would be useless to rehash them.
Anyway, once the severance of the ties with the Papal States was voted, it was time to decide how the new state would be set up, and here the differences started to surface. The majority of the delegates was in favor of a constitutional monarchy, while there was a vocal minority advocating a republic: the former were handicapped by the lack of a suitable recipient for the future crown, the latter by knowing that they would be unable to be supported by a majority of the citizens, in particular in the countryside. In the end a compromise was reached: the new state would have monarchical form, and Your Highness would be offered the crown to Romagne, in Personal Union and subject to your acceptance of a Constitution to be written by an ad-hoc constitutional convention. I have a sneaking suspicion that the republican faction voted in favor of this compromise, with their fingers crossed: they hope that you will decline the offer, or alternatively that the Constitution to be written would be unacceptable to you. In either case, they believe that the republican option would be revived."

"I would advise Your Highness not to accept this offer," Cavour spoke up "but I don't think it would be really needed. Adding a third crown to those of Sardinia and Lombardy would be too much, and destroy, or at least weaken, the good feeling you have been building until now, both in Italy and among the European chancelleries."

Ferdinand gave Camillo an impenetrable look, then smiled.
"I am of course honored and flattered by the proposal; the people of the Romagne are proud Italians who have been longing for justice and freedom for so long that I can be but happy in being chosen as their Constitutional monarch. However, I do agree with Camillo: the title of "Princeps Italiae" should not mean that I am the direct sovereign of half of the country. The crowns of Sardinia and Lombardy will anyway demand too much of my time, and this without considering my role as leader of the Italian Confederation and as ruler of the Confederal Districts. I don't think it would be to the benefit of the people of Romagne to be governed by an absent ruler. I do not see how good it could be changing a ruler in Rome with one constantly touring Northern Italy." A pause here, just to give Marquis d'Azeglio the time to think "Would this be the only difference, though?", and then Ferdinand inquired,

"Was there any consideration for other candidates?"

"Carlo Salvatore di Asburgo-Lorena (2) was mentioned, but he is not yet 10 years old: it would mean a long regency, and there is a lot of concern for the appetites of Tuscany. A Tuscan ruler would be seen as a potential Trojan horse to put the Legations under Tuscan control. The delegates from Pesaro and Urbino were the most vocal in rejecting this possibility. No one was as bold, or as crazy, to suggest a scion of the Bourbons from Naples." D'Azeglio replied.

"Then it is a good thing that I can suggest a possible alternative candidate: my own cousin, Prince Eugenio di Savoia Carignano.
My father legitimated him in 1835, and this solved the problem of his grandfather's morganatic marriage, and four years later he granted him the title of Royal Highness. Prince Eugenio had a successful career in the Sardinian Navy, where he rose to the rank of Admiral; then he was nominated Lieutenant of the Kingdom when my father and I left for the war in Lombardy, proving once more that he was in the confidence of the king. His wife is Francesca di Braganza, Imperial Princess of Brazil: it is a happy marriage, which has been blessed by four children. The most important thing, in my view at least, is that he's a man who knows what is meant by "duty". I do believe he would be a good monarch, and the Romagne would prosper under his crown. I never mentioned him before, Marquis D'Azeglio, because I wanted to allow the Romagnoli a chance to debate and decide the future of their land without external interference. Now that they have done that, the time has come to unveil this candidacy, and I will welcome your advice on how to play this card, for the good of Italy and the Romagne, both."

"A general election for delegates to the Constitutional Convention has been called for the last Sunday in May. The extension of the franchise has been hotly debated, the democrats asking for universal male suffrage, while the moderates wanted a limited franchise based on census. Once again, the solution was a compromise, based on the solution adopted in Lombardy: the census limit was lowered, and the intention is to reduce it again in the future. The delegates also chose an Executive Committee of 5 men, to act as Provisional Government: Count Giuseppe Pasolini dall'Onda (3), from Ravenna; signor Marco Minghetti, from Bologna; signor Giuseppe Galletti, also from Bologna; dottor Carlo Luigi Farini, from Ravenna; and dottor Carlo Grillenzoni (4), from Ferrara. Brigadier Bonomi refused a place on the Executive Committee, preferring to remain in command of the National Guard. They are fine men, well learned and true patriots. Pasolini, Minghetti and Galletti were for a time under the spell of Pio IX, and were ministers in the first constitutional government in Rome; however all of them resigned their position and left Rome after the infamous papal allocution of early April. Three of these men are in the delegation which arrived in Verona with me: Minghetti, Galletti and Farini."
Marquis d'Azeglio stopped for a moment to order his thoughts, before continuing.
"In different ways, these three men are worth watching.
Marco Minghetti comes from a family of high bourgeoisie, and the family properties are quite remarkable. He is still young, in his early thirties, very interested in the progress of science. He visited both France and England more than one time, and struck some good friendships there: among them, Pellegrino Rossi and Terenzio Mamiani, who I understand will soon arrive in Verona too. He had a brief tenure in the Papal Government as minister for Public Works, but resigned after the Pope refused to countenance a continuation of the war and went back to Bologna. He's certainly a liberal, but not insensitive to the plight of the working classes.
Giuseppe Galletti is a lawyer, and is certainly a democrat, even if a fairly moderate one. He participated in the insurrections of 1831, fighting under gen. Zucchi, and later one he took part in the insurrection of Rimini in 1845, for which was sentence to life in prison. He took advantage of the amnesty of 1846, and came under the spell of Pio IX and his reforms. Like Minghetti, he was a minister in the first Papal Government: minister of Police, if you can believe that a known dissident like him could be appointed to such a position. I believe his appointment was a bone tossed to the left, and as I said, he had become a notorious supporter of the Pope. This changed quickly, not just for the Papal allocution, but more likely for the repressions which followed, since Galletti could not countenance them. As a result, not only he resigned from government, but went back to Bologna: this is a bit surprising for me, since Galletti had always advocated Rome, rather than Bologna, as the natural center for reforms, and had been hotly debating this issue with the third member of the delegation, signor Farini, who had long been calling for Bologna to take the lead. Possibly not the most stable man I ever met, and very opinionated, but a true patriot all the same.
Carlo Luigi Farini is a doctor, from a well-known family of medical practitioners. He is well known for his studies of smallpox epidemics, of the connections between rice cultivations and malaria, and of the causes of pellagra. Notwithstanding his devotion to the medical profession, he was always active in politics: originally a follower of Mazzini, he soon became disillusioned with him, and Mazzini returned the feeling, considering him too moderate and unwilling to support revolutionary activities. Farini wrote the "Proclamation of Rimini" when the insurrection started: his effort was praised by all liberal and moderates, both in Italy and in Europe, and was condemned by reactionaries and by Mazzini, obviously for different reasons. A good man, a man of science and of ideals, although I feel compelled to disclose that he is also a very good friend of mine, as well as of Count Balbo.
These are the men who have arrived in Verona, Your Highness. I suggest that I may have a private word with signor Minghetti, before we have the official meeting. I don't really need to involve dottor Farini beforehand, I know how he thinks. Be careful when talking with signor Galletti: I wouldn't think he would be against your proposal, but the man is at times unpredictable."

"Two out of three is not really bad (5)." Cavour quipped "Let's not forget that we are benefitting from the war momentum, and that the people of the Romagne want to join the Confederation. I predict that the delegates will not be in a position to accept or refuse our candidate beforehand. They will have to go back to Imola and see what they think. Furthermore, the Constitutional Convention is still to be elected, and a Constitution written. Your Highness might suggest them to consider what has been written in the revised Sicilian Constitution, as well as in the Sardinian and Tuscan ones. No need to start from scratch and discover how to boil water, and anyway it is important to end this vacuum legis as soon as practical. I am quite confident that in the end everything will work out satisfactorily"

Footnotes
  1. IOTL, cardinal Chiarissimo Falconieri Mellini left Ravenna in early March 1849, to seek refuge in a monastery in the Venetian lagoon. No threats had been made against him, and it was always unclear why he should feel safer in a monastery in a city under siege than in his seat in Ravenna. ITTL, he makes a similar choice, but goes to Nonantola: it seems a more rational choice
  2. Carlo Salvatore was the second eldest male son of the Grand Duke of Tuscany
  3. Count Giuseppe Pasolini was born in an aristocratic family from Ravenna, with a long pedigree going back to the eleventh century. Notwithstanding his quarters of nobility, his grandfather was among the first to welcome the arrival of the French and his father prospered under Napoleon. A moderate, he also served in the Papal Government for a brief stint as minister for Agriculture, before resigning and returning to Bologna
  4. Carlo Grillenzoni was born in Ferrara in 1814. He studied medicine at the university of Bologna, graduating in 1836. He specialized in obstetrics and gynecology, soon becoming one of the best known specialists in the field. Returning to Ferrara, he founded in 1846 the first Italian kindergarten, grinding down the opposition of the church. In 1847, he became a professor at the university of Ferrara. A liberal moderate, and one of the informal leaders of Ferrara.
  5. IOTL, Cavour interacted with the three delegates in the 1850s: he had a good relatioship with Minghetti and Farini (who was appointed dictator for Emilia in 1859), but always disliked Galletti. ITTL, he comes even sooner to the same conclusion
 
A Savoy royal, but not that Savoy royal - a good compromise. :p

And hopefully, the new Brazilian queen will have a better fate, in Romagna, than a certain other Brazilian would've had IRL. :p
 
A Savoy royal, but not that Savoy royal - a good compromise. :p

And hopefully, the new Brazilian queen will have a better fate, in Romagna, than a certain other Brazilian would've had IRL. :p
I believe Eugenio deserved a better fate IOTL: he may have not been flamboyant enough to attract public attention, but he was certainly reliable and whenever he was given a task, he managed it pretty well. ITTL, he gets to marry a Brazilian princess (the beautiful one, to booth), gets a brood of children and a crown as the cherry on the cake.
A good choice for a constitutional monarch, I would say.

The other Brazilian one you mention is also going to have a better life ITTL (certainly a longer one), although she'll not become an icon of the left: I think she would not have any regrets, if she knew the alternative. Anyway, neither she nor her husband have arrived yet. A few more weeks, I think.

Incidentally, are you happy with the guys who have been voted into the Executive Committee of the Romagne?
 
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Arrix85

Donor
"Carlo Salvatore di Asburgo-Lorena (2) was mentioned, but he is not yet 10 years old: it would mean a long regency, and there is a lot of concern for the appetites of Tuscany. A Tuscan ruler would be seen as a potential Trojan horse to put the Legations under Tuscan control. The delegates from Pesaro and Urbino were the most vocal in rejecting this possibility. No one was as bold, or as crazy, to suggest a scion of the Bourbons from Naples." D'Azeglio replied.
There goes the question I wanted to make about Pesaro being in Romagne or the Roman republic, I was wondering about the medieval/renaissance connection (i.e. Malatesta...). I was a bit surprised by Urbino, but I realized it's quite near the OTL border with Emilia-Romagna (and to Pesaro, obviously).
 
There is an older connection with the Malatesta of Rimini, but also a more recent one with the duchy of Urbino, under the house of Montefeltro first, and later under the Della Rovere. In 1523, Pesaro was also elevated to the rank of capital, and the duchy was then known as "Pesaro-Urbino". In 1631, the last duke, Francesco Maria II della Rovere, died, leaving only a grandniece, Vittoria, who married Ferdinando II de'Medici, and the duchy was annexed to the Papal States. Vittoria's mother was another de'Medici, Claudia, and the de'Medici had traditional claims over the duchy, which were later inherited by the house of Lorena.
A map of the duchy is attached (from Wikipedia).

The papal government was never on a par with the old ducal house, but in 1848 I believe that the economical relations with Romagna were the main reason for the decision to leave the Papal States.
 

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Arrix85

Donor
I have got another (weird) geographical question. What will be the "Oltrepo' Pavese" region's name ITTL? I cannot really visualize Piacenza under Torino's rule... maybe there will be a Voghera's province (granted, if the Kingdom of Sardinia will have such subdivisions)?
 
I have got another (weird) geographical question. What will be the "Oltrepo' Pavese" region's name ITTL? I cannot really visualize Piacenza under Torino's rule... maybe there will be a Voghera's province (granted, if the Kingdom of Sardinia will have such subdivisions)?
The question is a bit weird.
Piacenza voted for annexation to Sardinia at the very beginning, and obviously such a request was very welcome: Piacenza (and its fortress) had been one of the most coveted goals of the Savoy. At least ITTL there has not been the farcical confrontation of Sardinian and Tuscan troops in Garfagnana, as it happened IOTL.
I do agree that Piacenza is not the plum it was before the war and the creation of the Confederation, but what can one do once the plebiscite results are in?

As for the organization of the civil administration in the Savoy state, I have not really focused on it: out of the top of my mind, I would expect that prefects (nominated from Turin, and with duties similar to the ones discharged by French prefects) have been in place (and most likely something similar will be arranged also in Lombardy).
Other states will choose the pattern of civil administration they think more suitable for their needs.
 

Arrix85

Donor
The question is a bit weird.
Piacenza voted for annexation to Sardinia at the very beginning, and obviously such a request was very welcome: Piacenza (and its fortress) had been one of the most coveted goals of the Savoy. At least ITTL there has not been the farcical confrontation of Sardinian and Tuscan troops in Garfagnana, as it happened IOTL.
I do agree that Piacenza is not the plum it was before the war and the creation of the Confederation, but what can one do once the plebiscite results are in?

As for the organization of the civil administration in the Savoy state, I have not really focused on it: out of the top of my mind, I would expect that prefects (nominated from Turin, and with duties similar to the ones discharged by French prefects) have been in place (and most likely something similar will be arranged also in Lombardy).
Other states will choose the pattern of civil administration they think more suitable for their needs.
My phrasing was not the best. What I meant was... ITTL what we know today as "Oltrepo' pavese" won't be under Lombardy, so It won't be Pavia's "oltrepo' " (beyond the Po for not Italians). I was just wondering about possible names for it, but maybe it won't have one, perhaps it will be split between the "alessandrino" and "piacentino" (as regional names, not administrative subdivisions).
 
My phrasing was not the best. What I meant was... ITTL what we know today as "Oltrepo' pavese" won't be under Lombardy, so It won't be Pavia's "oltrepo' " (beyond the Po for not Italians). I was just wondering about possible names for it, but maybe it won't have one, perhaps it will be split between the "alessandrino" and "piacentino" (as regional names, not administrative subdivisions).
The duchy of Piacenza included two bishoprics, Piacenza and Borgo San Donnino, but let's assume that just the former goes to Sardinia.

Voghera, Tortona, the Lomellina, Novara and the Oltrepo'Pavese were awarded to the Savoys after the war of Polish Succession, and the only change ITTL is that Piacenza will now be added, as the main city of the Piacentino. The western border of Lombardy follows the Ticino, and the southern one, the Po.

Map of post-1815 Northern Italy is attached. It's still mostly applicable in 1848, since the territories transferred to Modena when Tuscany annexed Lucca in December 1847 have reverted back to Tuscan rule. The attached map is from Wikipedia, and is in the public domain
 

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As of 1818 (so pre-POD) the Kingdom of Sardinia had four levels of administrative subdivisions, modeled out fo the Napoleonic one: Divisione (which was the equivalent of the French Department), Provincia (Arrondissement), Mandamento (Canton) and Comune (Municipality). Later IOTL (in 1859, Rattazzi's Reform) the term Provincia designed the old Divisione and the Circondario became the new term for Provincia. This was later extended to all the Kingdom of Italy. My guess is that ITTL Ferdinand will follow this path, and as @LordKalvan said, Lombardy's subdivision will follow these lines, with the same names. I believe the Confederal territories will have just a three-level subdivision, maybe their administration will be a lot more "martial" in names and organization, at least for the time being.
 
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