Driftless

Donor
MacArthur and the USAFFE staff definitely own part of the blame for the state of materiel preparation. However, the supply lines and logistics support from the mainland was equally lacking. Reading over the various convoy manifests in The Fall of the Phillipines and other works there’s a palpable sense of “doing something for the sake of doing something”. Mortars with no ammo, aircraft without maintenance equipment, crews without aircraft, artillery without sights or fire control.

it seemed like everyone knew the war was going to start and was just trying to throw as much material into the PI as possible rather than waiting to build combat configured loads or ship complete unit sets of material.

Compounding the "just ship it" mentality, could there have been some element of green-as-grass quartermasters, fresh from basic training draftees stilling learning their trade? "The manifest sez 37mm. They're all the same ain't they? Load 'em up fer Chriss' sake already!" And, "we ain't got none of that shit here..... Who cares? Send what's in the warehouse. While we're at it, sent that crate of shit that's sat in the corner fer-ever. Get rid of the damn thing already".
 
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Th
Compounding the "just ship it" mentality, could there have been some element of green-as-grass quartermasters, fresh from basic training draftees stilling learning their trade? "The manifest sez 37mm. They're all the same ain't they? Load 'em up fer Chriss' sake already!" And, "we ain't got none of that shit here..... Who cares? Send what's in the warehouse. While we're at it, sent that crate of shit that's sat in the corner fer-ever. Get rid of the damn thing already".
This situation shows the difference between Adm. Hart and his staff, MacArthur and his staff. Hart had been quietly and professionally since his arrival making sure that the Asiatic Fleet had all the supplies and equipment that it needed,: 6 months uniforms for the 4th Marines and the 2 Independent Battalions, 6 months field rations for all the Marines, 6 months uniforms for the Asiatic Fleet and 16th Naval District Personnel, 6 months dry rations for the Fleet and District, 90 days fuel for the fleet, 3-4 patrols of torpedoes. It was not everything Hart wanted (fixed wing land based air group, at least 1 preferably 2 Marine defense Battalions, 2 more 10,00 ,0 ton cruisers, another squadron of destroyers and tender, and repair ship [A very rare breed]. Hart had a complete professional education; Hart was a graduate of both the Navy and Army War Colleges, he served on the Superintendent staff and taught at the Naval Academy and the Army War College, and became Superintendent of the Naval Academy. His Senior staffers went on to Serve on the Manhattan Project, Command Naval Districts and Major fleets.
MacArthur had no Professional education beyond West Point, He was Superintendent of West Point, Commanded a division in France was Army Chief of Staff and served 2 Tours as Commander U.S. Forces in the Philippines before retiring to become Field Marshall of the Philippine Army. His is staff work was sloppy ( Send me everything you can) When War broke out both Hart and MacArthur received the Direct Order to Conduct WPO. Hart sent his ships to their assigned stations His Fleet boats into the South China Sea and his S Boats toward Formosa and NW Luzon ( note much of that area along the coast of Luzon as well as Lingayen Gulf averages 22 fathoms, @ 125 feet, near suicide depth for submarines.
MacArthur went to a forward defense his troops were not trained or equipped for They were forced to withdraw abandoning Clark and Iba fields and Ft Stostenberg and the supplies and equipment there most of the buildings were not burned. As opposed to the 4th Marines when they abandoned Olopango Naval Station, they burned the buildings, the Marine Base, Including not combat personal possessions, and fuel stocks that could not be moved. Moved out all weapons , stores uniforms and ammunition.
 
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MacArthur and the USAFFE staff definitely own part of the blame for the state of materiel preparation. However, the supply lines and logistics support from the mainland was equally lacking. Reading over the various convoy manifests in The Fall of the Phillipines and other works there’s a palpable sense of “doing something for the sake of doing something”.
As an XO used to say. "Mill about smartly!" Another gem was, "Indecision is the to flexibility". Perhaps these thoughts were from his father who was a naval Aviator in the PI ('42). Based upon true life experiences and observations of the "Master of Disaster"?

His father was in PatWing 10 before heading off to be personal pilot for ADM King. He heading back to the Pacific and served as CAG 10.
 

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
Coxy, I believe that is the type gun referred to in the equipment lists in the Pensacola convoy, a " 20 British 75 mm guns". These were over and above the standard 75mm pack Howitzer, 75 and 105 mm guns used by the American artillery units carried in the convoy. I imagine the ones in Malaya were sent earlier .
and
The British 75mm s in the PI, were assigned to Philippine Army and PS (23rd FA, 86th FA Bat. )units. Some Philippine Scouts artillery units (24thFA and 88th were all equipped as Regular U.S. Army units, with 75mm pack Howitzer and 75mm M 1897/ M-2 Carriage guns or 155mm M1918 How.
also
The "British 75" was known as the M1917, and along with the 2.95" Mountain Gun was the mainstay of Artillery in the PI. The Army history The Fall of the Philippines mentions 10 M1 75mm Pack Howitzers and a number of 75mm (presumably the M1917, not the M1897 based on references to British 75mms) were diverted from the Canal Zone to the PI, but is silent on their subsequent use. There were 155s with the coast artillery, but the M1917 GPFs that would be assigned to Bataan were orphans of the ill-fated inland seas defense project) . Records show the The M1897 ("French 75") coming to the islands mounted on the M3 gun motor carriage (halftrack) as Self Propelled Mounts (SPMs)- according to the U.S. Army history Fall of the Philippines, MacArthur had requested 288 of them modified for high speed towing as guns for the PA. So, there was a lot of equipment without crewing.

Whitman's "The Guns of Bataan" in the 1995 issue of Army History lays out how the problem of crewing the SPMs was addressed by forming a composite organization post-initiation of hostilities from coast artillery AAA crews, Philippine recruits, some experienced Scout Artillerymen, and other "found" personnel. Ironically, MacArthur had requested the 37mm AT guns which were TOE for PA infantry regiments and had instead received the M3 SPMs. Similarly, an artillery regiment (155mm GPF) and a coast artillery (AA) regiment (MG/37mm/Searchlight) were also formed.

Overall, both Japanese and US sources indicate the USAFFE/USFIP Artillery performed admirably. However, the lesson for any reinforcement of Malaya is in the shortfalls. Artillery pieces (SPM and British 75s especially) were shipped without panoramic sights or fire control equipment in some cases. As a result, Wainwright's 1946 report the defense devotes detail to the impacts in efficiency and survivability on the artillery force of fire direction by base piece shoot against preregistered targets, the limitations of telephone or even courier corrections, and insufficient survey and met data for the guns to rapidly reposition and resume fire. As important as it is to bring the guns to Malaya, it's as or more important to bring the fire direction equipment and personnel, communications, and support elements that enable rapid effects and speedy transitions between targets.
Thanks Butchpfd and Amir for this

There's a nice little video on this gun, see

Interestingly it suggests these guns were already in the Philippines prior to 1941, so 24 must have been locally 'lent' to the Australians. Ammo must have been US issued, and was HE and shrapnel, see https://military-history.fandom.com/wiki/QF_2.95-inch_mountain_gun. Do you think shrapnel rounds might have been sent as well as HE. Using this in the AT role the HE round itself would have been fine, although given the problems of aiming and recoil, it would have been challenging . I hope to have a little play with this weapon in the TL.
 

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
No, it's been worked on in 2023, so it's eligible and I've therefore nominated it, here: https://www.alternatehistory.com/fo...-nominations-and-seconds.550784/post-24866021
Please feel free to second (note that only one person needs to second) and then to vote once the voting threads are up...
and
Hi FriendlyGhost and Driftless, thank you for the nominations and votes, and to everyone else who voted for me. I thought Munich Shuffle was a deserved winner, he had my vote, along with A better rifle at Halloween, which I also enjoy reading. Maybe my turn new year :openedeyewink:
 
and

Hi FriendlyGhost and Driftless, thank you for the nominations and votes, and to everyone else who voted for me. I thought Munich Shuffle was a deserved winner, he had my vote, along with A better rifle at Halloween, which I also enjoy reading. Maybe my turn new year :openedeyewink:
Thank you for your kind words, it’s always tough with so many great timelines. I have also enjoyed your timeline and wish you luck next year.
 
Another well written historical review of USN Submarine operations in the Asiatic Fleet.
 
MWI 41120514b Malaya Command 07Dec41

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
Units or Officers written in italics indicates not historical to this Command


Malaya Command
Lt Gen Arthur Ernest Percival (subordinate to Lord Gort)
HQ - Singapore


III Indian Corps (Malaya except Johore)
Lt Gen Alfred Reade Godwin-Austen (subordinate to Lt Gen Percival)
HQ - Kuala Lumpur


9th Indian Infantry Division
Maj Gen Arthur Edward ‘Bustling’ Barstow
HQ – Kuala Lipis


8th Indian Inf Bde – Kota Bharu

Brig ‘Billy’ Berthold Wells Key
2 Bn Royal Berkshire Regt – Lt Col Alec Pendock Aveline (from India Nov40)
1 Bn 13 Frontier Force Rifles], Lt Col Clarence Gilbert (from India 16Apr41)
3 Bn 17 Dogra Regt, Lt Col George Allen Preston (from India Nov40)
19 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE
7 Independent Indian Mountain Battery, Maj Scott, (4x3.7in Hows, pack mules) at Kuala Krai
88 (2 West Lancashire) Field Regt RA, Lt Col Sylvain Claude D’Aubuz
351 Bty, Maj Ford, 352 Bty, Maj Cornish, 464 Bty, Maj Kelly, all 8x25 Pdrs, Bttys at Kota Bharu, Gong Kedah, and Bachok (these two serving 41st Bde)


41st Indian Inf Bde (41st not historically used) Kelantan beaches south of Kota Bharu down to Besut

Brig
Henry Dawson Moorhead
2 Bn 10 Baluch Regt, Lt Col James Frith (or John) (from India Nov40)
2 Bn 12 Frontier Force Regt, Lt Col Arthur Edward Cumming (from India 16Apr41)
2 Bn 2 Gurkha Rifles, Lt Col Geoffrey Harley Douglas Woollcombe (from India 02Sep41)
57 Field Coy Madras S&M IE


22nd Indian Inf Bde - Kuantan

Brig GWA Painter
2 Bn 1 Gurkha Rifles, Lt Col ‘Jack’ Fulton (from India 02Sep41)
2 Bn 18 Royal Garhwal Rifles, Lt Col Guy ERS Hartigan (from India Nov40)
5 Bn 11 Sikh Regt, Lt Col John Parkin (from India 16Apr41)
22 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE, Capt John Eglington Bate
5 Field Regt RA, Lt Col Edward WF Jephson
(73 Bty RA – Maj Don 8 x 4.5in How, 63 Bty – Maj Bland 8 x 4.5in How), third Btty (81) being formed at Port Swettenham 02Dec41. Regt at Kuantan.


Loaned to 9th Indian Div – defending coastal towns of Terengganu
1 Bn Malay Regt, Lt Col James RG André
(HQ, A Coy & D Coy Terengganu, B Coy Dungun, C Coy Chukai)
1 Indep Malay Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs) – CO?
2 guns at Terengganu plus 1 Eng pltn, 2 guns at Dungun plus 1 Eng pltn.
2 Malay Field Eng Coy – CO?



9th Divisional Troops
6 Duke of Connaught’s Own Lancers (Watson’s Horse) – CO?
Armd Car Recon Bn (HQ/6, A/6, B/6 and C/6 Sqns), equipped with Marmon Herrington Armd Cars, assigned to 9 Indian Division, based at Camp Mantin, just north of Seremban, arrived 28Nov41, training until 16-18 Feb42

1 Middlesex MG Bn – Lt Col HW (Monkey) Stewart (Coy’s A & B with 8th, C with 41st, D with 22nd Bdes)


42 Field Park Coy (Royal Bombay Sappers and Miners) Capt Thomas W Nash

160 Field Regt RA, Lt Col AFJ Sugden (A & B Btys, 16 x 4.5inch Hows, formed from one Bty of 155 Regt 19May41, declared operational 08Dec41) A third battery, C, would be formed 02Dec41, equipped with 16 3-inch mortars, but not be ready until Feb42 at the earliest. Based at Port Swettenham, awaiting deployment to Kelantan.



11th Indian Infantry Division

Maj Gen David Murray-Lyon
HQ – Sungai Petani


6th Indian Inf Brigade - Jitra Line

Brig William Oswald Lay (from India Oct40)
2 Bn East Surrey Regt, Lt Col George Edward Swinton (from Shanghai Sep40)
1 Bn 8 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Ronald Charles Sidney Bates (from India Nov40)
2 Bn 16 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Henry Sloane Larkin (from India Nov40)
22 Mountain Artillery Regt RA, Lt Col George Leonard Hughes, 4, 10, 21 (Maj John Bertram Soper) and 27 Btys, ea 4x3.7in Hows (from India Sep39)
17 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE


15th Indian Inf Bde - Jitra Line

Brig Kenneth Alfred Garrett
1 Bn Leicestershire Regt, Lt Col Charles Esmond Morrison (from India Feb41)
2 Bn 9 Jat Regt, Lt Col Charles Knowler Tester (from India 25Mar41) LOC duties
1 Bn 14 Punjab Regt, Lt Col ‘James’ Fitzpatrick (from India 25Mar41)
3 Field Coy Bengal S&M IE


35th Indian Inf Bde - (35th not historically used)

Brig
Eric Lawrence Wilson-Haffenden
1 Bn Seaforth Highlanders,
Lt Col Lindsay Robertson (A&S Hldrs) (from China Nov40)
5 Bn 7 Raiput, LT Col Roger John Edward Cadogan-Rawlinson (from Hong Kong Feb41)
5 Bn 14 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Cyril Stokes (Malaya Pre 1939)
137 Field Regt RA 24 x 25 Pdrs, Lt Col Charles Holmes, 349, 350 & 510 Btys (arr 28Nov41)
59 Field Coy Madras S&M IE


11th Divisional Troops
5 King Edward VII’s Own Lancers (Probyn’s Horse) – Lt Col Claude Ernest Pert
Armd Car Recon Bn (HQ/5, A/5, B/5 and C/5 Sqns), equipped with Marmon Herrington Armd Cars, assigned to 11 Indian Division, based at Camp Mantin, just north of Seremban, arrived 02Sep41, training until 15-17Dec41


1 Bn Manchester Regt, Lt Col Edward Barclay Holmes (Machine Gun Bn) (Malaya Pre 1939)

80 Anti-Tank Rgt RA, Lt Col William ES Napier, (arr 06Nov41) 2 Bty, 215 Bty, 272 Bty, 273 Bty

155 (Lanarkshire Yeomanry) Field Regt RA, B & C Btys 16 x 4.5in Hows, Lt Col Augustus Murdoch (from Aug41) A third battery, A, would be formed 02Dec41, equipped with 16 3-inch mortars, but not be ready until Feb42 at the earliest. Based at Port Swettenham.

26 Independent Indian Mountain Battery, Maj JP Crowe, 4x3.7in Hows, pack mules (Based down at Rawang, just north of Kuala Lumpur, for training, operational 10Nov41)

43 Field Park Coy, Royal Bombay Sappers and Miners


Fortress Penang
Brig Cyril Arthur Lyon - HQ: Glugor
2 Bn 15 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Charles Malet Lane (from India Nov40, in Borneo historically)
I Coy, Malay Regt, equipped for local defence only, Georgetown, Penang

3 Battalion SSVF, Lt Col Charles Alexander Scott
(used in Penang for static defence with 3 static machine gun companies of 12 Vickers MG, 400 men total in 3x100 companies plus 100 in HQ, ages up to 55, and 36 Vickers MGs).
2 Indian HAA Regt (2, 7, & 11 HAA Btys), Lt Col GE Proes (ex Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational Oct41. Part of III Indian Corps Anti-Aircraft Artillery Bde
11 Coastal Regt RA, Lt Col ML More – HQ Bukit Batu Maung
8 Coastal Bty RA, 2 x 6in guns, Fort Cornwallis
20 Coastal Bty HKSRA, 2 x 6in guns, Bukit Batu Maung
33 Coastal Bty RA, 2 x 9.2in guns, Maj AOE Mills, Fort Auchry
15 Bty (5 Searchlight Regt RA)
3 Malay Field Eng Coy
26 Fortress Company RE


III Corps Reserve
12th Indian Inf Bde

Brig Archibald Charles Melvill Paris
2 Bn Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, Lt Col Angus MacDonald, (from India Sep39)
5 Bn 2 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Cecil Deakin (from India Sep39)
4 Bn 19 Hyderabad Regt, Lt Col Herbert Lawrence Hill (from India Sep39)
122 (West Riding) Field Regt RA (278 & 280 Btys, 16 x 4.5-inch Hows), Lt Col George A Dyson (from UK Mar41), 279 at Kuala Krai, 280 at Kuala Lumpur, third Btty being formed 02Dec41.
15 Field Coy Madras S&M IE, Maj B R Muir


III Corps Troops
2 Northamptonshire Yeomanry Regt, Lt Col Otho Leslie Prior-Palmer
(HQ, A, B and C Sqns), sent to Malaya with Valentine tanks, arrives October 1941. 16 tanks each Sqn, plus 4 in HQ, total 54. Based at Camp Mertajam

1 Bn Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, Lt Col Ralph GS Cox (from India 13Feb41), was Penang Garrison Bn, designated armoured troops, paired with Tank Regt, based at Camp Mertajam

J Coy, Malay Regt, equipped for local defence only, Kuala Lumpur

6 Medium Regt RA, Lt Col WG Fox (16 x 6in Hows) (18 & 19 Btys) (from India Feb41)

Armoured train Lancelot – Lieutenant Keith Norton
6 pounder 6 cwt Hotchkiss Mk I gun, two single Vickers 2 pounder Mk II Pom-Pom AA guns, and two Vickers machine guns, with a crew of 35 from the Middlesex Regt. Armour plate used will stop rifle and machine gun fire, shell splinters and grenades. Lancelot based at Alor Star, Kedah.

Armoured train Galahad – Lieutenant Emlyn ‘Rusty’ Price
6 pounder 6 cwt Hotchkiss Mk I gun, two single Vickers 2 pounder Mk II Pom-Pom AA guns, and two Vickers machine guns, with a crew of 35 from the Manchester Regt. Armour plate used will stop rifle and machine gun fire, shell splinters and grenades. Galahad based at Kuala Krai, Kelantan.



III Indian Corps Anti-Aircraft Artillery Bde

Brig Howard Vincent Allpress
2 Indian HAA Regt (2, 7 & 11 HAA Btys), Lt Col GE Proes (ex Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational Oct41. Based on Penang Island

3 Indian HAA Regt Lt Col John Corbet Yale (ex Lt Col HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational 01Oct41
3 HAA Bty is based at Kota Bharu airfield, also manning 2 naval pompom guns
8 HAA Bty is based at Kuala Krai airfield
12 HAA Bty is based at Gong Kedah airfield, also manning 2 naval pompom guns

5 Indian HAA Regt Lt Col WT Temple (ex-Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational 01Dec41
5 HAA Bty split 4 guns at Jitra, and 4 at Alor Star airfield
10 HAA Bty is based at Sungai Patani airfield, Hat Yai from 07Dec41
15 HAA Bty is based at Butterworth airfield, Songkhla from 07Dec41

6 Indian HAA Regt, Lt Col HL Duncan (ex-Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational 01Dec41, at Taiping
6 HAA Bty
13 HAA Bty
17 HAA Bty



III Indian Corps Engineers
1 Artisan Works Coy (Bombay S&M), Maj JH Heep RE
45 Army Troops Coy (Bombay S&M), 6 Bridging Section attached, Maj JR Dinwiddie RE
46 Army Troops Coy (Madras S&M), 14 Bridging Section attached, Maj J Elkington RE

5 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Nov40) Railway work
8 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Feb41) Bridge/road work
13 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Apr41) general work
24 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Aug41) general work
29 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (Non-combatant, from India Aug41) Stevedore work
All above made up of 4 labour companies.


Working under direction of III Indian Corps
1 FMSR Railway Repair Coy at Sentul (Kuala Lumpur)
2 FMSR Railway Repair Coy at Gemas (Negeri Sembilan)
3 FMSR Railway Repair Coy at Prai (Province Wellesley)



Strategic Reserve, available for Operation Matador if called
8th Australian Infantry Division
Maj Gen Sydney Rowell in Sep 1941 (subordinate to Lt Gen Percival)


22nd Australian Inf Bde

Brig Harold Burfield Taylor (arrived 18Feb41)
2/18 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col Colonel Arthur Varley
2/19 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col Colonel Charles Anderson
2/20 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col Colonel Charles Assheton
2/10 Field Regt RAA (Queensland), Lt Col Alfred Walker Walsh
(HQ, 19, 20, & 60 Field Batteries, 19, 20, and 60 equipped with 18 Pdrs)
A Coy, 2/4 MG Regt
2/12 Field Coy, RAE (New South Wales)


23rd Australian Inf Bde

Brig Edmund Lind (arrived 22Apr41)
2/21 Australian Inf Bn Victoria), Lt Col Leonard Roach
2/22 Australian Inf Bn (Victoria), Lt Col Howard Carr
2/40 Australian Inf Bn (Tasmania), Lt Col William Leggatt
2/14 Field Regt RAA, Lt Col William Christie (HQ, 27, 28 Batteries, both had 4 18-pdrs and 4 4.5-hows, 64 Bty raised in Malacca 04Feb42)
B Coy, 2/4 MG Regt
2/10 Field Coy, RAE (Victoria)



27th Australian Inf Bde

Brig Duncan S Maxwell (arrived 15Aug41)
2/26 Australian Inf Bn (Queensland), LT Col Arthur Boyes
2/29 Australian Inf Bn (Victoria), Lt Col John Robertson
2/30 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col ‘Jack’ Frederick Galleghan
2/15 Field Regt RAA (New South Wales), Lt Col John Wright (11Nov41) HQ, 29 and 30 Btys equipped with 8x25Pdrs, 65 Bty raised, and active 28Dec41 8x25-pdrs
C Coy, 2/4 MG Regt
2/11 Field Coy, RAE (Queensland)


8th Divisional Troops
2/2 Australian Independent Coy (Amphibious, later jungle) - Maj Alexander Spence (273 men) working with HMCS Prince Henry

2/3 Australian Independent Coy (Jungle) - Maj Donald George Melbourne Matheson (273 men) – Training Telok Anson

8 Divisional Cavalry Regt, LT Col Albert Saggers
(HQ/8, A/8, B/8, and C/8 Sqns) raised in March 1941 to replace original transferred to 9th Div, equipped with Marmon Herrington Armoured Cars

D Coy, 2/4 Australian Machine-Gun Regt (Western Australia), Lt Col Michael Anketell


2/4 Anti-Tank Regt RAA, Lt Col Cranston A McEachern (HQ & 13, 14 and 15 Btys (4x2 Pdrs, 8x75mm Pack How ea), 16 Bty in Malacca, no guns.

2/3 Medium Regt RAA, (68 and 69 batteries of 8 x 6 inch Hows) completes training 1st January 1942 in Malacca.

2/5 Field Park Coy, RAE

2/4 Australian Pioneer Bn (NSW), Lt Col John McCarty, 4 labour companies with infantry training.

8th Australian Divisional Infantry training battalion has been created and is holding replacements, located in Malacca.



Malaya Airfield Defence Force (all arrived in Malaya in March1941)
1 Bn Mysore Infantry (Indian States Forces), Lt Col Kenneth Harvey Preston
1 Bn Bahawalpur Infantry (Indian States Forces), Lt Col Harry Ernest Tyrell
1 Bn, Hyderabad Regt (Indian States Forces), Lt Col Charles Albert Hendrick


Malaya Home Guard
Provides internal security for towns
Kangar Home Guard Coy
Alor Star Home Guard Coy
Penang Home Guard Coy
Taiping Home Guard Coy
Ipoh Home Guard Coy
Kuala Lumpur Home Guard Coy
Port Swettenham Home Guard Coy
Seremban Home Guard Coy
Johore Bharu Home Guard Coy
Kota Bharu Home Guard Coy
Kuantan Home Guard Coy


Fortress Singapore (Singapore and Johore)
Maj Gen Frank Keith Simmons (subordinate to Lt Gen Percival)
HQ Fort Canning Bunker, Singapore


Johore
28th Indian Inf Bde
(was Gurkha) – Defending Mersing

Brig W St J Carpendale
2 Bn 9 Gurkha Rifles, Lt Col Wallace Raymond Selby (from 02Sep41)
3 Bn 16 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Sheppard Percy Fearon (from 25Mar41)
2 Bn 14 Punjab Regt, Lt Col GR Kidd (from Hong Kong May/July 1941)
23 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE


Singapore Island
1st Malaya Inf Bde


Brig George CR Williams
2 Bn Loyal Regt (North Lancashire), Lt Col Mordaunt Elrington (Malaya Pre 1939)
1 Bn Roya Malay Regt, Lt Col James RG André - loaned to 9th Indian Div
2 Bn Royal Malay Regt, Lt Col Frederick W Young (operational 28Jun41)
1 Indep Malay Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs) loaned to 9th Indian Div
2 Indep Malay Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs)
2 Malay Field Eng Coy



2nd Singapore Inf Bde

Brig Francis Hugh Fraser
2 Bn Gordon Highlanders, Lt Col Richard Gilbert Lees (Malaya 1939)
2 Bn 17 Dogra Regt, Lt Col Sidney Clermont Scott
1 Bn Singapore (Chinese) Regt, Lt Col James Oliphant Mackellar
2 Bn Singapore (Chinese) Regt,
Lt Col CFH Riches
1 Indep Singapore Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs)
2 Singapore Field Eng Coy


Airfield Security Troops (both arrived in Malaya in March1941)
Jind Infantry Bn (Indian States Forces) Lt Col Gurbaksh Singh
Karpurthala Infantry Bn (Indian States Forces) Major Aziz Ahmad
Deployed as single Coys at airfields in Johore and on Singapore Island


Singapore Anti-Aircraft Artillery Bde

Brig Warren G Wildey

1 HAA Regt HKSRA, Lt Col Archer Edwards Tawney (Btys 6 & 9, Maj PE White, both with 8 x 3.7in each, 10 Bty with 8 x 40mm)

2 HAA Regt HKSRA, Lt Col R Mcl More (Btys 11 & 12 each with 8 x 3.7in, 13 Bty with 8 x 3in)

3 HAA Regt RA, Lt Col Francis Edgar Hugonin (11, 29, & 30 Btys with 8 x 3.7in each)

1 Indian HAA Regt, Lt Col JR Williamson - 1, 16, & 18 HAA Btys, 8 x 3in each, also used to train new Indian gunners

3 LAA Regt HKSRA, Lt Col. Denis Vivian Hill, 14 & 16 Bttys, 8 x 40mm Bofors each (15 Btty sent to Aden)

5 Searchlight Regt RA (13, 14, 315, & 316 Btys), Lt Col RAO Clarke (used for both AA and Coastal defence)


Singapore Fixed Defences, Coastal Defence

Brig AD Curtis

7 Coastal Regt RA (Faber Fire Command), Lt Col Hereward Douglas St George Cardew

11 Battery RA
Fort Connaught Battery- 3 x 9.2inch MK 10 B.C. guns (36,700 yards)
Fort Serapong Spur Battery - 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Siloso Point Battery – 1 x 12 pounder gun
Pulau Hantu Battery – 1 x 18 pounder field gun in the single HD emplacement (or 2 x 12 pounder guns)
Berhala Reping Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns

31 Battery RA
Buona Vista Battery – 2 x 15inch MK I B.C. guns (42,000 yards)
Tanjong Tereh Battery – 1 x 12 pounder gun (or never armed)
Batu Berlayer Battery – 2 x 12 pounder guns

5 Battery HKSRA
Silingsing Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Fort Siloso Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)

7 Battery HKSRA
Labrador Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Pasir Laba Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)


9 Coastal Regt RA (Changi Fire Command), Lt Col Charles Philip Heath

7 Battery RA
Johore Battery – 3 x 15inch MK I B.C. guns (42,000 yards)
Betang Kusar Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)

22 Battery RA
Tekong Battery – 3 x 9.2inch MK 10 B.C. guns (36,700 yards)
Sphinx Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Ladang Battery (Pulau Tekong Besar) – 1 x 12 pounder gun
Pulau Sajahat Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns
Calder Harbour Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns

32 Battery RA
Pengerang Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Changi Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Changi Outer (Palm) Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns
Tanjong Johor Battery (Pengerang) - 2 x 18 pounders in field emplacements

16 Defence Regt RA (966, 967, & 968 Btys), Lt Col MSH Maxwell-Gumbleton

1 & 2 Bn Straits Settlement Volunteer Forces - Lt Col Thomas Henry Newey (Used in Singapore for static defence with 6 static machine gun companies of 12 Vickers MG, 800 men total in 6x100 men companies plus 200 in HQ’s. Age of men is up to 55, established totals slightly short, and 72 Vickers MGs.)


Royal Engineers Singapore Garrison Bde
30 Fortress Coy RE
34 Fortress Coy RE
35 Fortress Coy RE
41 Fortress Coy RE
 

Fatboy Coxy

Monthly Donor
Ok, so finally done the first OOB, but I've changed my mind about the OOBs, I'll only give them when that command is about to conduct operations, which will make things a little easier for me, and keep the OOB close to the opening scenes. I'll answer posts on this OOB, or anything else for that matter, but my next instalment of the storyline won't be until Monday - Tuesday next week, as I' off to Prague, one of my boys is getting married, and this is his long Stag weekend, woo hoo!
 
I’ve just been rereading McAuslan, so I was looking out for RG Lees and the Gordon’s! Hopefully it’ll be a better war for all of them. Very nice to get a picture of who’s there ITTL.

Congratulations to the boy, and have a good time in Prague!
 

Driftless

Donor
I scanned through names of the commanders in the OOB, looking for any familiar names, but then realized that most/all of the OTL survivors spent the war as POWs. That may, or may not be the case in this universe.

If any of those commonwealth commanders survive, or stay out of Japanese incarceration to fight later campaigns, that sends a flock of butterflies loose
 
Were the Hong Kong originated light AA units equipped with Bofors 40mm L/60 in late 1941? I don't have any reference, but would have thought that two pounder pom-poms would be more likely...and probably LV guns, i.e. Mk II, at that.
 

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Ramp-Rat

Monthly Donor
So while our author is away enjoying himself I hope, I will attempt to make some observations on his recently posted OOB, of the various ground units in Malaysia. First and foremost I wish to emphasise that these are sorely my personal opinions, and do not necessarily represent those of our author. Starting with the Home Guard companies that have been raised in the smaller cities and towns, who while lacking crew served weapons, being only equipped with old Lee Enfield’s, Lee Medford’s or even Martini Henry’s cambered in 303. Still they will provide a very useful function, as once war breaks out they can mount a guard on the local police station, civil offices, post and telegraph office and the local bank, plus providing a checkpoint on the main road and if there is one at the railway station. Thus relieving the local police to carry out their duties without having to deploy men on internal security duties, or standing guard outside their own station or one of the vital buildings. Given standard British practice a company will be made up of between three and five platoons, each one containing between thirty and forty men. Six platoons would be split into two companies and less than three wouldn’t be called a company, but rather a detachment. So at a minimum given three platoons of thirty men you are looking at ninety men in total, where as five platoons of forty men makes two hundred men, plus I assume up to ten men in the HQ detail. These Home Guard Companies while vitally useless in defending their cities/towns, will massively reduce the stain on the regular army and help tremendously with maintaining civil order and security behind the front line.

The Indian States Forces allocated to airfield defence, while only slightly better equipped than the Home Guard and just a fraction better trained. Can if deployed in companies provide a ground force to twelve airfields, thus reducing the need for RAF personnel to undertake basic guard duties. And given that the airfields have seen significant improvements in their facilities, such as more and better protection for personnel, supplies and aircraft. Plus the deployment of Heavy Anti Aircraft Artillery with either Pom Pom guns or Vickers K guns as light AA, will make the task of attacking the airfields much more costly for the Japanese. The use of the ISF for airfield defence, as with the use of the Home Guard, greatly reduces the strain on the regular army, and will enable them to concentrate on defence against the Japanese main force. The personnel allocated to the Singapore garrison including those ISF personnel based on the various airfields, and the members of the volunteer forces, will other than during any Japanese air raids, or in the event that the situation goes completely pear shaped. Have very little to do other than continue to train, and maintain their equipment. The especially applies to the coastal artillery, unless the IJN, goes completely mad or the situation has degenerated completely they like the majority of their coastal artillery fellows around the world, are not going to hear a shot fired in anger. As for the infantry they will continue to train and might find themselves switched out to replace an infantry unit that has suffered significant casualties, and needs time to recover and rebuild. In addition they will also for fill the functions of assisting the civil authorities to maintain order and security within Singapore. With the British and Indian formations being the first to go, thus allowing the local formations more time to train and throw off carders around which new volunteers can form additional units.

The Australian 8th Division while being held back as a general reserve, should be able to compete its training and finally become a fully fledged division. Able to swap places with either of the Indian divisions or if circumstances allow launch a major counterattack once the front has been stabilised. The Fortress Penang group provided the Japanese are prevented from gaining access to large numbers of boats, should be able to retain control of the island, even if the Japanese manage to overrun the positions on the mainland and thus split the Japanese effort. Plus with assistance from the Navy the island can be kept supplied, and raids into the Japanese rear areas launched. The two Indian divisions while under equipped by European standards and with some of their equipment being functionally obsolete in Europe, are in comparison to the Japanese better equipped. And both of them ITTL are far better prepared and trained than they were IOTL, they have had admittedly limited training in jungle warfare and know that the standard Japanese attack involves sending a force around any position in an attempt to establish a roadblock behind the defenders. The two armoured trains and the armoured car units even without the launch of Operation Matador, are going to be successful to an extent in their spoiling attacks once war breaks out. The Japanese do not expect the British to go on the offensive from day one, they expect to dominate the pace of the campaign, and have become accustomed to dictating the when and where of campaigns in China. Having an opponent attack them before they expect is going to be a major shock, as is the weight of artillery fire that they are going to be subjected to. Having an enemy that are equipped with armoured vehicles including tanks that far exceeds anything they can bring to the field, is also going to present major problems. All the hard work done by the British establishment in Malaysia, and the improvements in training and equipment is going to make it virtually impossible for the Japanese to enjoy the sort of success that they enjoyed IOTL.

RR.
 
Units or Officers written in italics indicates not historical to this Command


Malaya Command
Lt Gen Arthur Ernest Percival (subordinate to Lord Gort)
HQ - Singapore


III Indian Corps (Malaya except Johore)
Lt Gen Alfred Reade Godwin-Austen (subordinate to Lt Gen Percival)
HQ - Kuala Lumpur


9th Indian Infantry Division
Maj Gen Arthur Edward ‘Bustling’ Barstow
HQ – Kuala Lipis


8th Indian Inf Bde – Kota Bharu

Brig ‘Billy’ Berthold Wells Key
2 Bn Royal Berkshire Regt – Lt Col Alec Pendock Aveline (from India Nov40)
1 Bn 13 Frontier Force Rifles], Lt Col Clarence Gilbert (from India 16Apr41)
3 Bn 17 Dogra Regt, Lt Col George Allen Preston (from India Nov40)
19 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE
7 Independent Indian Mountain Battery, Maj Scott, (4x3.7in Hows, pack mules) at Kuala Krai
88 (2 West Lancashire) Field Regt RA, Lt Col Sylvain Claude D’Aubuz
351 Bty, Maj Ford, 352 Bty, Maj Cornish, 464 Bty, Maj Kelly, all 8x25 Pdrs, Bttys at Kota Bharu, Gong Kedah, and Bachok (these two serving 41st Bde)


41st Indian Inf Bde (41st not historically used) Kelantan beaches south of Kota Bharu down to Besut

Brig
Henry Dawson Moorhead
2 Bn 10 Baluch Regt, Lt Col James Frith (or John) (from India Nov40)
2 Bn 12 Frontier Force Regt, Lt Col Arthur Edward Cumming (from India 16Apr41)
2 Bn 2 Gurkha Rifles, Lt Col Geoffrey Harley Douglas Woollcombe (from India 02Sep41)
57 Field Coy Madras S&M IE


22nd Indian Inf Bde - Kuantan

Brig GWA Painter
2 Bn 1 Gurkha Rifles, Lt Col ‘Jack’ Fulton (from India 02Sep41)
2 Bn 18 Royal Garhwal Rifles, Lt Col Guy ERS Hartigan (from India Nov40)
5 Bn 11 Sikh Regt, Lt Col John Parkin (from India 16Apr41)
22 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE, Capt John Eglington Bate
5 Field Regt RA, Lt Col Edward WF Jephson
(73 Bty RA – Maj Don 8 x 4.5in How, 63 Bty – Maj Bland 8 x 4.5in How), third Btty (81) being formed at Port Swettenham 02Dec41. Regt at Kuantan.


Loaned to 9th Indian Div – defending coastal towns of Terengganu
1 Bn Malay Regt, Lt Col James RG André
(HQ, A Coy & D Coy Terengganu, B Coy Dungun, C Coy Chukai)
1 Indep Malay Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs) – CO?
2 guns at Terengganu plus 1 Eng pltn, 2 guns at Dungun plus 1 Eng pltn.
2 Malay Field Eng Coy – CO?



9th Divisional Troops
6 Duke of Connaught’s Own Lancers (Watson’s Horse) – CO?
Armd Car Recon Bn (HQ/6, A/6, B/6 and C/6 Sqns), equipped with Marmon Herrington Armd Cars, assigned to 9 Indian Division, based at Camp Mantin, just north of Seremban, arrived 28Nov41, training until 16-18 Feb42

1 Middlesex MG Bn – Lt Col HW (Monkey) Stewart (Coy’s A & B with 8th, C with 41st, D with 22nd Bdes)


42 Field Park Coy (Royal Bombay Sappers and Miners) Capt Thomas W Nash

160 Field Regt RA, Lt Col AFJ Sugden (A & B Btys, 16 x 4.5inch Hows, formed from one Bty of 155 Regt 19May41, declared operational 08Dec41) A third battery, C, would be formed 02Dec41, equipped with 16 3-inch mortars, but not be ready until Feb42 at the earliest. Based at Port Swettenham, awaiting deployment to Kelantan.



11th Indian Infantry Division

Maj Gen David Murray-Lyon
HQ – Sungai Petani


6th Indian Inf Brigade - Jitra Line

Brig William Oswald Lay (from India Oct40)
2 Bn East Surrey Regt, Lt Col George Edward Swinton (from Shanghai Sep40)
1 Bn 8 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Ronald Charles Sidney Bates (from India Nov40)
2 Bn 16 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Henry Sloane Larkin (from India Nov40)
22 Mountain Artillery Regt RA, Lt Col George Leonard Hughes, 4, 10, 21 (Maj John Bertram Soper) and 27 Btys, ea 4x3.7in Hows (from India Sep39)
17 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE


15th Indian Inf Bde - Jitra Line

Brig Kenneth Alfred Garrett
1 Bn Leicestershire Regt, Lt Col Charles Esmond Morrison (from India Feb41)
2 Bn 9 Jat Regt, Lt Col Charles Knowler Tester (from India 25Mar41) LOC duties
1 Bn 14 Punjab Regt, Lt Col ‘James’ Fitzpatrick (from India 25Mar41)
3 Field Coy Bengal S&M IE


35th Indian Inf Bde - (35th not historically used)

Brig
Eric Lawrence Wilson-Haffenden
1 Bn Seaforth Highlanders,
Lt Col Lindsay Robertson (A&S Hldrs) (from China Nov40)
5 Bn 7 Raiput, LT Col Roger John Edward Cadogan-Rawlinson (from Hong Kong Feb41)
5 Bn 14 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Cyril Stokes (Malaya Pre 1939)
137 Field Regt RA 24 x 25 Pdrs, Lt Col Charles Holmes, 349, 350 & 510 Btys (arr 28Nov41)
59 Field Coy Madras S&M IE


11th Divisional Troops
5 King Edward VII’s Own Lancers (Probyn’s Horse) – Lt Col Claude Ernest Pert
Armd Car Recon Bn (HQ/5, A/5, B/5 and C/5 Sqns), equipped with Marmon Herrington Armd Cars, assigned to 11 Indian Division, based at Camp Mantin, just north of Seremban, arrived 02Sep41, training until 15-17Dec41


1 Bn Manchester Regt, Lt Col Edward Barclay Holmes (Machine Gun Bn) (Malaya Pre 1939)

80 Anti-Tank Rgt RA, Lt Col William ES Napier, (arr 06Nov41) 2 Bty, 215 Bty, 272 Bty, 273 Bty

155 (Lanarkshire Yeomanry) Field Regt RA, B & C Btys 16 x 4.5in Hows, Lt Col Augustus Murdoch (from Aug41) A third battery, A, would be formed 02Dec41, equipped with 16 3-inch mortars, but not be ready until Feb42 at the earliest. Based at Port Swettenham.

26 Independent Indian Mountain Battery, Maj JP Crowe, 4x3.7in Hows, pack mules (Based down at Rawang, just north of Kuala Lumpur, for training, operational 10Nov41)

43 Field Park Coy, Royal Bombay Sappers and Miners


Fortress Penang
Brig Cyril Arthur Lyon - HQ: Glugor
2 Bn 15 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Charles Malet Lane (from India Nov40, in Borneo historically)
I Coy, Malay Regt, equipped for local defence only, Georgetown, Penang

3 Battalion SSVF, Lt Col Charles Alexander Scott
(used in Penang for static defence with 3 static machine gun companies of 12 Vickers MG, 400 men total in 3x100 companies plus 100 in HQ, ages up to 55, and 36 Vickers MGs).
2 Indian HAA Regt (2, 7, & 11 HAA Btys), Lt Col GE Proes (ex Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational Oct41. Part of III Indian Corps Anti-Aircraft Artillery Bde
11 Coastal Regt RA, Lt Col ML More – HQ Bukit Batu Maung
8 Coastal Bty RA, 2 x 6in guns, Fort Cornwallis
20 Coastal Bty HKSRA, 2 x 6in guns, Bukit Batu Maung
33 Coastal Bty RA, 2 x 9.2in guns, Maj AOE Mills, Fort Auchry
15 Bty (5 Searchlight Regt RA)
3 Malay Field Eng Coy
26 Fortress Company RE


III Corps Reserve
12th Indian Inf Bde

Brig Archibald Charles Melvill Paris
2 Bn Argyll and Sutherland Highlanders, Lt Col Angus MacDonald, (from India Sep39)
5 Bn 2 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Cecil Deakin (from India Sep39)
4 Bn 19 Hyderabad Regt, Lt Col Herbert Lawrence Hill (from India Sep39)
122 (West Riding) Field Regt RA (278 & 280 Btys, 16 x 4.5-inch Hows), Lt Col George A Dyson (from UK Mar41), 279 at Kuala Krai, 280 at Kuala Lumpur, third Btty being formed 02Dec41.
15 Field Coy Madras S&M IE, Maj B R Muir


III Corps Troops
2 Northamptonshire Yeomanry Regt, Lt Col Otho Leslie Prior-Palmer
(HQ, A, B and C Sqns), sent to Malaya with Valentine tanks, arrives October 1941. 16 tanks each Sqn, plus 4 in HQ, total 54. Based at Camp Mertajam

1 Bn Royal Inniskilling Fusiliers, Lt Col Ralph GS Cox (from India 13Feb41), was Penang Garrison Bn, designated armoured troops, paired with Tank Regt, based at Camp Mertajam

J Coy, Malay Regt, equipped for local defence only, Kuala Lumpur

6 Medium Regt RA, Lt Col WG Fox (16 x 6in Hows) (18 & 19 Btys) (from India Feb41)

Armoured train Lancelot – Lieutenant Keith Norton
6 pounder 6 cwt Hotchkiss Mk I gun, two single Vickers 2 pounder Mk II Pom-Pom AA guns, and two Vickers machine guns, with a crew of 35 from the Middlesex Regt. Armour plate used will stop rifle and machine gun fire, shell splinters and grenades. Lancelot based at Alor Star, Kedah.

Armoured train Galahad – Lieutenant Emlyn ‘Rusty’ Price
6 pounder 6 cwt Hotchkiss Mk I gun, two single Vickers 2 pounder Mk II Pom-Pom AA guns, and two Vickers machine guns, with a crew of 35 from the Manchester Regt. Armour plate used will stop rifle and machine gun fire, shell splinters and grenades. Galahad based at Kuala Krai, Kelantan.



III Indian Corps Anti-Aircraft Artillery Bde

Brig Howard Vincent Allpress
2 Indian HAA Regt (2, 7 & 11 HAA Btys), Lt Col GE Proes (ex Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational Oct41. Based on Penang Island

3 Indian HAA Regt Lt Col John Corbet Yale (ex Lt Col HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational 01Oct41
3 HAA Bty is based at Kota Bharu airfield, also manning 2 naval pompom guns
8 HAA Bty is based at Kuala Krai airfield
12 HAA Bty is based at Gong Kedah airfield, also manning 2 naval pompom guns

5 Indian HAA Regt Lt Col WT Temple (ex-Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational 01Dec41
5 HAA Bty split 4 guns at Jitra, and 4 at Alor Star airfield
10 HAA Bty is based at Sungai Patani airfield, Hat Yai from 07Dec41
15 HAA Bty is based at Butterworth airfield, Songkhla from 07Dec41

6 Indian HAA Regt, Lt Col HL Duncan (ex-Maj HKSRA Hong Kong) Operational 01Dec41, at Taiping
6 HAA Bty
13 HAA Bty
17 HAA Bty



III Indian Corps Engineers
1 Artisan Works Coy (Bombay S&M), Maj JH Heep RE
45 Army Troops Coy (Bombay S&M), 6 Bridging Section attached, Maj JR Dinwiddie RE
46 Army Troops Coy (Madras S&M), 14 Bridging Section attached, Maj J Elkington RE

5 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Nov40) Railway work
8 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Feb41) Bridge/road work
13 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Apr41) general work
24 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (non-combatant, from India Aug41) general work
29 Aux Bn, Indian Pioneer Corps (Non-combatant, from India Aug41) Stevedore work
All above made up of 4 labour companies.


Working under direction of III Indian Corps
1 FMSR Railway Repair Coy at Sentul (Kuala Lumpur)
2 FMSR Railway Repair Coy at Gemas (Negeri Sembilan)
3 FMSR Railway Repair Coy at Prai (Province Wellesley)



Strategic Reserve, available for Operation Matador if called
8th Australian Infantry Division
Maj Gen Sydney Rowell in Sep 1941 (subordinate to Lt Gen Percival)


22nd Australian Inf Bde

Brig Harold Burfield Taylor (arrived 18Feb41)
2/18 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col Colonel Arthur Varley
2/19 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col Colonel Charles Anderson
2/20 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col Colonel Charles Assheton
2/10 Field Regt RAA (Queensland), Lt Col Alfred Walker Walsh
(HQ, 19, 20, & 60 Field Batteries, 19, 20, and 60 equipped with 18 Pdrs)
A Coy, 2/4 MG Regt
2/12 Field Coy, RAE (New South Wales)


23rd Australian Inf Bde

Brig Edmund Lind (arrived 22Apr41)
2/21 Australian Inf Bn Victoria), Lt Col Leonard Roach
2/22 Australian Inf Bn (Victoria), Lt Col Howard Carr
2/40 Australian Inf Bn (Tasmania), Lt Col William Leggatt
2/14 Field Regt RAA, Lt Col William Christie (HQ, 27, 28 Batteries, both had 4 18-pdrs and 4 4.5-hows, 64 Bty raised in Malacca 04Feb42)
B Coy, 2/4 MG Regt
2/10 Field Coy, RAE (Victoria)



27th Australian Inf Bde

Brig Duncan S Maxwell (arrived 15Aug41)
2/26 Australian Inf Bn (Queensland), LT Col Arthur Boyes
2/29 Australian Inf Bn (Victoria), Lt Col John Robertson
2/30 Australian Inf Bn (New South Wales), Lt Col ‘Jack’ Frederick Galleghan
2/15 Field Regt RAA (New South Wales), Lt Col John Wright (11Nov41) HQ, 29 and 30 Btys equipped with 8x25Pdrs, 65 Bty raised, and active 28Dec41 8x25-pdrs
C Coy, 2/4 MG Regt
2/11 Field Coy, RAE (Queensland)


8th Divisional Troops
2/2 Australian Independent Coy (Amphibious, later jungle) - Maj Alexander Spence (273 men) working with HMCS Prince Henry

2/3 Australian Independent Coy (Jungle) - Maj Donald George Melbourne Matheson (273 men) – Training Telok Anson

8 Divisional Cavalry Regt, LT Col Albert Saggers
(HQ/8, A/8, B/8, and C/8 Sqns) raised in March 1941 to replace original transferred to 9th Div, equipped with Marmon Herrington Armoured Cars

D Coy, 2/4 Australian Machine-Gun Regt (Western Australia), Lt Col Michael Anketell


2/4 Anti-Tank Regt RAA, Lt Col Cranston A McEachern (HQ & 13, 14 and 15 Btys (4x2 Pdrs, 8x75mm Pack How ea), 16 Bty in Malacca, no guns.

2/3 Medium Regt RAA, (68 and 69 batteries of 8 x 6 inch Hows) completes training 1st January 1942 in Malacca.

2/5 Field Park Coy, RAE

2/4 Australian Pioneer Bn (NSW), Lt Col John McCarty, 4 labour companies with infantry training.

8th Australian Divisional Infantry training battalion has been created and is holding replacements, located in Malacca.



Malaya Airfield Defence Force (all arrived in Malaya in March1941)
1 Bn Mysore Infantry (Indian States Forces), Lt Col Kenneth Harvey Preston
1 Bn Bahawalpur Infantry (Indian States Forces), Lt Col Harry Ernest Tyrell
1 Bn, Hyderabad Regt (Indian States Forces), Lt Col Charles Albert Hendrick


Malaya Home Guard
Provides internal security for towns
Kangar Home Guard Coy
Alor Star Home Guard Coy
Penang Home Guard Coy
Taiping Home Guard Coy
Ipoh Home Guard Coy
Kuala Lumpur Home Guard Coy
Port Swettenham Home Guard Coy
Seremban Home Guard Coy
Johore Bharu Home Guard Coy
Kota Bharu Home Guard Coy
Kuantan Home Guard Coy



Fortress Singapore (Singapore and Johore)
Maj Gen Frank Keith Simmons (subordinate to Lt Gen Percival)
HQ Fort Canning Bunker, Singapore


Johore
28th Indian Inf Bde
(was Gurkha) – Defending Mersing

Brig W St J Carpendale
2 Bn 9 Gurkha Rifles, Lt Col Wallace Raymond Selby (from 02Sep41)
3 Bn 16 Punjab Regt, Lt Col Sheppard Percy Fearon (from 25Mar41)
2 Bn 14 Punjab Regt, Lt Col GR Kidd (from Hong Kong May/July 1941)
23 Field Coy Bombay S&M IE


Singapore Island
1st Malaya Inf Bde


Brig George CR Williams
2 Bn Loyal Regt (North Lancashire), Lt Col Mordaunt Elrington (Malaya Pre 1939)
1 Bn Roya Malay Regt, Lt Col James RG André - loaned to 9th Indian Div
2 Bn Royal Malay Regt, Lt Col Frederick W Young (operational 28Jun41)
1 Indep Malay Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs) loaned to 9th Indian Div
2 Indep Malay Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs)
2 Malay Field Eng Coy



2nd Singapore Inf Bde

Brig Francis Hugh Fraser
2 Bn Gordon Highlanders, Lt Col Richard Gilbert Lees (Malaya 1939)
2 Bn 17 Dogra Regt, Lt Col Sidney Clermont Scott
1 Bn Singapore (Chinese) Regt, Lt Col James Oliphant Mackellar
2 Bn Singapore (Chinese) Regt,
Lt Col CFH Riches
1 Indep Singapore Lt Bty (4 x 18 Pdrs)
2 Singapore Field Eng Coy


Airfield Security Troops (both arrived in Malaya in March1941)
Jind Infantry Bn (Indian States Forces) Lt Col Gurbaksh Singh
Karpurthala Infantry Bn (Indian States Forces) Major Aziz Ahmad
Deployed as single Coys at airfields in Johore and on Singapore Island


Singapore Anti-Aircraft Artillery Bde

Brig Warren G Wildey

1 HAA Regt HKSRA, Lt Col Archer Edwards Tawney (Btys 6 & 9, Maj PE White, both with 8 x 3.7in each, 10 Bty with 8 x 40mm)

2 HAA Regt HKSRA, Lt Col R Mcl More (Btys 11 & 12 each with 8 x 3.7in, 13 Bty with 8 x 3in)

3 HAA Regt RA, Lt Col Francis Edgar Hugonin (11, 29, & 30 Btys with 8 x 3.7in each)

1 Indian HAA Regt, Lt Col JR Williamson - 1, 16, & 18 HAA Btys, 8 x 3in each, also used to train new Indian gunners

3 LAA Regt HKSRA, Lt Col. Denis Vivian Hill, 14 & 16 Bttys, 8 x 40mm Bofors each (15 Btty sent to Aden)

5 Searchlight Regt RA (13, 14, 315, & 316 Btys), Lt Col RAO Clarke (used for both AA and Coastal defence)


Singapore Fixed Defences, Coastal Defence

Brig AD Curtis

7 Coastal Regt RA (Faber Fire Command), Lt Col Hereward Douglas St George Cardew

11 Battery RA
Fort Connaught Battery- 3 x 9.2inch MK 10 B.C. guns (36,700 yards)
Fort Serapong Spur Battery - 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Siloso Point Battery – 1 x 12 pounder gun
Pulau Hantu Battery – 1 x 18 pounder field gun in the single HD emplacement (or 2 x 12 pounder guns)
Berhala Reping Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns

31 Battery RA
Buona Vista Battery – 2 x 15inch MK I B.C. guns (42,000 yards)
Tanjong Tereh Battery – 1 x 12 pounder gun (or never armed)
Batu Berlayer Battery – 2 x 12 pounder guns

5 Battery HKSRA
Silingsing Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Fort Siloso Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)

7 Battery HKSRA
Labrador Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Pasir Laba Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)


9 Coastal Regt RA (Changi Fire Command), Lt Col Charles Philip Heath

7 Battery RA
Johore Battery – 3 x 15inch MK I B.C. guns (42,000 yards)
Betang Kusar Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)

22 Battery RA
Tekong Battery – 3 x 9.2inch MK 10 B.C. guns (36,700 yards)
Sphinx Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Ladang Battery (Pulau Tekong Besar) – 1 x 12 pounder gun
Pulau Sajahat Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns
Calder Harbour Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns

32 Battery RA
Pengerang Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Changi Battery – 2 x 6inch MK 7 B.C. guns (14,000 yards)
Changi Outer (Palm) Battery – 2 x twin 6 pounder guns
Tanjong Johor Battery (Pengerang) - 2 x 18 pounders in field emplacements

16 Defence Regt RA (966, 967, & 968 Btys), Lt Col MSH Maxwell-Gumbleton

1 & 2 Bn Straits Settlement Volunteer Forces - Lt Col Thomas Henry Newey (Used in Singapore for static defence with 6 static machine gun companies of 12 Vickers MG, 800 men total in 6x100 men companies plus 200 in HQ’s. Age of men is up to 55, established totals slightly short, and 72 Vickers MGs.)


Royal Engineers Singapore Garrison Bde
30 Fortress Coy RE
34 Fortress Coy RE
35 Fortress Coy RE
41 Fortress Coy RE
Compared to OTL, about how many more troops and weapons are available for Percival?
 
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