TL-191 Uniform, weapons and equipment of the Secondary Combatants.

Imperial Russia T-41 heavy barrel.
1 T-41.png

Originally designed as an SPG but converted into a heavy barrel to counter Germany's Löwen panzer (OTL Tiger-I), the T-41 was armed with an 85mm AA gun and was capable of taking out out Löwens on almost equal terms.
 
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Pz.Kpfw. V-III Medium Panzer: Imperial Germany.
0 Pz.Kpfw. VIII.jpg

Entering service in 1936 the Pz.VIII was the first German panzer to use an interleaved wheel suspension. The Pz.VIII was a well armed and armoured barrel but was heavy and under-powered for a medium barrel, it would be supplanted by the Pz.Kpfw. IX Löwen (OTL Tiger-I) heavy barrel from 1938 onward.
 

the UK vz.39, Standard Light Machine Gun of the Austro-Hungarian Forces during the Second Great War.

Despite the nation's status as a minor power compared to its German and American Allies, Austria-Hungary was not idle between the wars, and took advantage of the post-war economic uptick in the 20's to engineer a new class of weapons as part of the nation's efforts to promote unity, as well as demonstrate that they were not solely reliant on patronage from the German Empire.
Inspired by the US "Barrel Roll Offensive" Austrian commanders determined that the bulky Schwarzlose Heavy Machine guns were unsuitable for wars of maneuver and by Mountain troops, and so began exploration of new tactics of mobile operations, giving rise to the fielding of light machine guns and other offensive weaponry.

Brno gun works, centered in Brno in the province of South Moravia, was one of the Empire's primary arsenals, and provided the army with a series of prototypical light machine guns, inspired by such weapons as the Danish Madsen and US Lewis guns, eventually developed the Vz.39, a box-fed 7.62x54 mm weapon that can be transported by a single infantryman, as well as being fitted to heavier direct-fire mounts or on vehicles. the Ammunition represented something of a paradigm shift in Austrian munitions, as the woefully outdated 8x50mmR Mannlicher round, which still used only semi-smokeless powder, was phased out and replaced with rounds based on those used in Russian service rifles.

the Weapon was an instant hit with the military, and was soon equipping many of the divisions at the Empire's disposal, as well as being exported to allies and client states of the Central powers.
 
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the UK vz.39, Standard Light Machine Gun of the Austro-Hungarian Forces during the Second Great War.

Despite the nation's status as a minor power compared to its German and American Allies, Austria-Hungary was not idle between the wars, and took advantage of the post-war economic uptick in the 20's to engineer a new class of weapons as part of the nation's efforts to promote unity, as well as demonstrate that they were not solely reliant on patronage from the German Empire.
Inspired by the US "Barrel Roll Offensive" Austrian commanders determined that the bulky Schwarzlose Heavy Machine guns were unsuitable for wars of maneuver and by Mountain troops, and so began exploration of new tactics of mobile operations, giving rise to the fielding of light machine guns and other offensive weaponry.

Brno gun works, centered in Brno in the province of South Moravia, was one of the Empire's primary arsenals, and provided the army with a series of prototypical light machine guns, inspired by such weapons as the Danish Madsen and US Lewis guns, eventually developed the Vz.39, a box-fed 7.62x54 mm weapon that can be transported by a single infantryman, as well as being fitted to heavier direct-fire mounts or on vehicles.

the Weapon was an instant hit with the military, and was soon equipping many of the divisions at the Empire's disposal, as well as being exported to allies and client states of the Central powers.
Nice post, but I doubt that the Austro-Hungarian would ever use 7.62x54mmR for ammunition since it was a Russian round. The more plausible rounds for that gun could either be 8x56mmR or maybe even 7.92x57mm. Or unless that 7.62x54mm you mentioned could be a newly developed round, which still does not make any sense with me at least.
 
Nice post, but I doubt that the Austro-Hungarian would ever use 7.62x54mmR for ammunition since it was a Russian round. The more plausible rounds for that gun could either be 8x56mmR or maybe even 7.92x57mm. Or unless that 7.62x54mm you mentioned could be a newly developed round, which still does not make any sense with me at least.
Considering the Austrians were primarily fighting the Russians and the Serbians in GW1 (whom the Russians would be supplying) it stands to reason they would have captured quantities of Russian 7.62x54mmR ammunition, which would have been a massive upgrade from the 8x50mmR Mannlicher ammunition being used in their Mannlicher 1895 service rifle. The 8x56mmR ammuniton wasn't developed until the 1930's, so the pre-existing Russian round would have been reverse-engineered for adoption as a quicker solution to replace the woefully outdated Mannlicher round.
 
View attachment 558639

A pair of Austro-Hungarian Fighters, Second Great War. Inspired by the work of S. Marlowski.

As the Central Powers were victorious, it stands to reason Anthony Fokker would have remained in German service, developing planes for the Luftwaffe and by extension the Austrians. IRL Austra-Hungary did have some indigenous aircraft development, with companies like Lohner designing prototypes during WWI, and one could foresee them retaining that ability following a Central Powers victory.​
as for the F23 i alsways thought it would make a great jet conversion, the front engine bay can hold a nice load of guns, and then in the rear a single jet-engine (a bit like the saab 21R)
 
How about expeditionary/free forces? It could be a good idea like exemples:
- (Expeditionary) Spanish Blue Division
- (Free) Haitian Squadron
- (Expeditionary) Quebec brigade
- (Free) Czech Regiment
 
Some more aircraft liveries of the Imperial Russian Air Force.
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Petlyakov Pe-8 Heavy Bomber of the 47th Heavy Bombardment Division based outside of Smolensk, circa Spring of 1942. In the late 1930s, the Imperial Russian Air Force would introduce into service the Pe-8 Bomber as a replacement for the Tupolev TB-3 Bomber. The Pe-8 saw heavy action throughout the early and middle parts of the Second Great War as a heavy bomber, which these aircraft would target German and other Central Power targets such as railway yards, airfields, as well as important industrial centers throughout Germany, Poland, Austria-Hungary, and the Ottoman Empire, usually these operations would be conducted at night. 6 aircraft would also be used on the Alaskan Front in both providing supplies to Russian ground forces and also dropping weapons and supplies to the Canadian Partisans. Before and during the war, a total of 116 air-frames would be produced, of these, a total of 68 aircraft would be lost during the conflict. The type would go on to be used in the post-war period by both the Russian People's Air Force and the Imperial Alaskan Air Force until 1955 and 1960 respectively when they were replaced by both new jet bombers and due to their age. Two of the airframes still exist to this day, one outside of Moscow at the Monino Museum and the other in New Archangel in Alaska at the Park to the Heroes of the Second World War. Which that particular aircraft had carried the Russian Royal Family into exile in Alaska in 1948.
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A Polikarpov Po-4 fighter belonging to an unknown squadron on the Alaskan Front, circa Summer of 1942. In late 1939, Nikolai Polikarpov had proposed a new fighter design which was to armed with heavy cannons and was to serve in the bomber escort and ground attack role. In early 1941, the first prototype of the fighter, dubbed the ITP took flight, and proved popular. The fighter would then enter production in November of 1941 and the type would soon see it's first combat over Baltic region later that month, proving to be superior to the German Junkers Ju-22 fighters that were the standard of the Kaiserliche Luftwaffe. After that more fighters would be sent to Alaska to replace the older bi-planes there and would again prove to be superior to the USAF P-24 Hawk fighters. The Po-4 fighter in service would go on to be used as an escort and defensive fighter for it's role until the type was ultimately supplanted by the newer Yakovlev Yak-3 and 9 and Lavochkin fighters in early 1944. However the Po-4 would remain in service all the way to war's end and during the Russo-Japanese War (alternatively known as the Siberian War) and a few would remain in use by the Russians until 1946.
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A Tupolev SB-2M-104 fast bomber belonging to the 96th Bombardment Division based in Manchuria, circa 1939. In the early 1930s, the Russians would develop a brand new bomber for it's air force known as the Tupolev ANT-40, which the design featured advanced features such as an enclosed cockpit and retractable landing gear. The type would enter service with the Russian Air Force in 1936 and would be exported before the war, to nations such as the Greek Army Air Corps (38 machines), Imperial Persian Air Force (15), Chinese Air Force (62), the Spanish Nationalist Faction during the Spanish Civil War (68), Royal Ethiopian Air Force (14), and the Peruvian Air Force (12). During both the Spanish Civil War and the Sino-Japanese War, the bomber would prove to be popular due it's speed which had enabled it to evade most enemy fighters. By the start of the Second Great, the type would be declared obsolete by the Russian Air Force, but the type would make up around 84 percent of it's bomber force. By late 1941, the surviving bombers would be immediately replaced by newer and more advanced designs such as the Petlyakov Pe-2 on the Eastern and Caucasus Fronts. The type would continue to see frontline service in the Alaskan Front until late 1942 and would also see service in the Siberian War against the Japanese from 1943 to 1945.
 
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AFV's of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Pt. 1

The AH did not make any barrels or other types of armoured fighting vehicles during the first Great War but during the 1920's they did their best to try to catch up.
The first AH barrel to enter service were German made LK-II's (top pic) purchased from Germany and was designated the Imperial Panzerwagen 1 or IP-I.
The first domestically produced AFV was a light barrel (or keg) armed only with an MG-20 and was really no more than an armoured car on tracks and was dubbed the IP-II (second to top pic).
The IP-II would see a great deal of service in helping to squash local uprisings by disaffected minority groups within the Empire and would also serve as a reconnaissance keg and training vehicle during the Second Great War.

The IP-II was followed by the StuH. II (3rd vehicle in pic) a turret-less assault barrel armed with a 3.7cm cannon, the StuH-II used the same suspension and engine as the IP-II but had better armour protection. The StuH-II would see service in the first year of the Second Great war but would thereafter be removed from front-line service but would be converted into numerous types of AFV's in the support role such as SPG's and SPAAG's. The StuH-II would in one form or another see service throughout the war.

The IP-II was followed by the IP-III (bottom of pic) a small-ish medium barrel heavily influenced by German barrels and using an interleaved wheel suspension and was serviced by a five man crew and armed with a German designed cannon in the same 45mm caliber used by the Russians.
The IP-III would see a lot of combat in the first two years of the war but was easily outmatched by Russian medium barrels but could hold its own against Russian kegs.
The IP-III would also be converted into various type of AFV's but its most widely used variant was as a barrel buster.


@ Austro-Hungarian Barrels..jpg


To be continued.
 
AFV's of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Pt. 2

As soon as the Second Great War began the Austro-Hungarian Empire realized that their armoured force needed serious updating, this of course was easier said than done but some solutions were found for improving or at least extending the service life of some of AH's AFV's.
One solution was to remove the turrets from a barrel and add a bigger gun thus making a barrel buster but for some of the smaller AFV's in AH's arsenal this was not considered sufficient.

The IP-II was passed over for up-gunning but because there were so many in AH service that they were kept in service in a variety of other roles, the common of which was a front line supply vehicle, a vehicle that could ride into battle behind the panzers and other AFV's carrying ammo and spare parts, these vehicles were also used to carry troops into combat and to bring out the wounded from said combat. They were dubbed "Mules" (top pic) and like their British counterpart the Bren Carrier were very useful vehicles.

Another common conversion was to modify kegs into self propelled rocket launchers a poor man's SPG. These vehicles were armed with German designed Nebelwefers and were dubbed "Panzerwefers" (middle pic).

The most common modification for AH kegs and under-armed medium barrels was to mount a larger forward firing only cannon onto the hull thus making a barrel buster or as the Austro-Hungarians called them "Jagdfass" (bottom pic), often these AFV's were armed with captured enemy guns.

@ Austro-Hungarian Barrels. II.jpg
 
PzJag 343.png

During the Second Great War, the Austro-Hungarian and German forces capture a large number of Russian armored vehicles, including about 854 T-46 kegs. While many remained in their original configuration, others would be converted into other uses, such as the Barrel Buster role. Above is an example of a Panzerjaeger 343-75(r) which had been converted in the field into a barrel hunter with the addition of a 7.5cm Pak 40 Anti-Barrel Gun.
 
Small Arms of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in the Second Great War.

AH=Webly.jpg


1 Steyr P-37 in 9mm, standard sidearm of the AH Armed forces was strongly influenced by the Walther P-34. *

2 MP-39 9mm submachine gun, a tough, rugged and compact weapon borrowed features from both German and Russian sub-guns. **

3 Steyr MK- 43 semi-automatic rifle a welcomed late war adoption by AH troops who appreciated the increased firepower and the fifteen round magazine.
The MK stood for Maschinen Karabiner. ***

* Actually a Webly made handgun but it looks a lot like a Walther P-38, the P-34 I mentioned is the P-38 but developed earlier in the TL-191 timeline.

** A Vietcong modified PPSH-41 sub-gun with some parts I added from some sub-gun prototypes that never went into mass production and an M3 magazine and mag-wel.

*** OTL Vollmermaschinenkarabiner an experimental German semi-automatic rifle that never went into production.
 
Homemade and Improvised Weapons of the 3rd Mormon Uprising

There were three Mormon uprisings or revolts in Utah, the first during the Second Mexican-American War, 2nd during the First Great War and a final one during the Second Great War.
In all three clashes the Mormons were always in bad need of procuring firearms and heavy weapons and went thru various means to obtain them, in most cases weapons were smuggled into Moron territory by the CSA, Great Britain, Russia, various Native American tribes and to a lesser extant Mexico and France.

Throughout all the uprising the Mormons also attempted to produce their own weapons this was of course very difficult because of the strong presence of US troops who were always on the look out for such endeavors. The Mormons persisted in their attempts to produce weapons just as they had persisted in challenging the US.

Most homemade weapons made by the Mormons were very crude and some just downright dangerous to their own users but during the Second Great War the Mormons were able to produce some decent and more importantly reliable firearms.
One very innovate firearms maker was John Browning who showed a true talent for the art of gun making, some of his guns were original designs and some were very good copies of mass produced firearms.

Below are some examples of captured homemade Mormon firearms.
No.1 is a Browning original handgun design, No.2 is believed to also be a Browning design and No.8 is a Browning copy of the Thompson sub-machine gun*.

None of these weapons were made in large enough numbers to have a lasting affect on the tide of battle.
Homemade-Impro-Guns.jpg

* An OTL Viet-Cong improvised Thompson made using parts from an M1 Carbine.
 
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AFV's of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Pt. 3
IP-IV and variants

The IP-IV was AH's second medium barrel to enter service in the Second Great, the IP-IV was a better armoured and armed barrel than its predecessor the IP-III but still suffered from bolted on armour. Armed with a 75mm cannon the IP-IV could at least deal some punishment to most medium Russian barrels and was a terror against kegs and light skinned armoured AFV's.

@ Austro-Hungarian Barrel+.jpg

The IP-IV was the most numerous produced AFV that AH made and was used as the basis for numerous support vehicles.

1 IP-IV SPAAG. armed with a 20mm auto-cannon and was also used against ground targets with great affect.
2 Jagdfass-IV armed with a German made KwK. 40 the Jagdfass-IV had the highest kill score of all Autro-Hungarian AFV's.
3 IP-IV Bergenpanzer not a fighting vehicle but still played an important part in all battles during the second half of the Second Great War.
@ Austro-Hungarian Barrel+AFV's.jpg
 
The Aleksandr Nevsky or the AN series of heavy barrels was the mainstay heavy barrel for the Imperial Russian in the early and mid war periods of the Second Great War until their replacement by the Dimitry Donskoi series of heavy barrels in late 1943.
AN-1.png

The first tank in the series which was the AN-1 obr. 1940 which had a 76mm F-32 main gun and three DT-29 machine-guns (with a potential fourth gun as an AA gun)
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The obr. 1941 variant which now features an F34 76mm gun.
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Here is an AN-1 with some bolt-on armor which gave the vehicle increased protection from enemy Anti-barrel weapons. This modification was not uncommon to be found on the AN-1 series.
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The AN-1 obr. 1942 variant, which the major change was the addition of a new powerplant as well as getting a new cast turret, which was cheaper for production value.
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The AN-3/85, which was an upgraded model that was introduced in late 1942 to increase the firepower of the AN series by adding an 85mm main gun.
 

Attachments

Military Aircraft of the Austro-Hungarian Empire

1 Halberstadt H-23 ground support aircraft, a sturdy and tough plane that served in various role from dive bomber to anti-armour aircraft. The H-23 served from beginning to the end of the war.

2 Fokker D-XXXIII fighter used a licensed built Junkers Jumo engine and was armed with two 20mm cannons at the beginning of the war and was then re-armed with three and finally five 20mm cannons at war's end. The D-XXXIII also received more powerful engines as the war progressed and could compete with Allied fighters right up to the end of the war.

3 Gotha G-66 medium bomber AH's main bomber from beginning to the end of the war.
AH Aircraft.png


I imagine WWI companies like Halberstadt, Fokker and Gotha would still be going concerns in TL-191 and while Fokker did continue to build aircraft post war IOTL here Fokker becomes one of AH's main producers of aircraft, Gotha also survived the war but only built a few designs for Germany IOTL and Halberstadt ceased to make aircraft post war.
 
My take on Austria-Hungary's weaponry in the Second Great War:

Pistols:
Steyr Model 1911


Steyr/Mannlicher model 1905 (Being phased out as of 1935, still popular with Cavalry personnel)


Frommer Model 1937 (New model intended to replace the 1911, only issued to Air Corps pilots and General staff officers by the outbreak of War)



Submachine Guns:
ZK-383 (issued to Mountain Troops, intended to serve both as an SMG and support weapon)


CZ 247


Steyr Model 1934:



Rifles:
Mannlicher model 1886 ( issued to police and reserve militia)


Mannlicher 1895 (being phased out, issued to rear-line troops)


Zb 420 (new model automatic rifle based on CSA Tredegar)




Light Machine Guns
Vz.58:


Vz.59 (Vz.58 Upgraded to belt-feed)




Heavy Machine Guns:
Schwarsloze M07:


ZB 53:



Other:
Model 1941 Anti-Panzer Rifle
 
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My take on German weapons of the Second Great War

Pistols:
Luger Model 1908:

Mauser C96: (issued to Pilots who could use it as a survival weapon)

Walther PP: (Officer's Sidearm, also issued to Stormtroopers)



Submachine Guns:
Schmeisser MP18/28:


Erma EMP35:



Rifles:
Mauser Gewehr 98:


Mauser Gewehr Karabiner 98k:


Mauser Model 1916 Self-Loader;



Light Machine Guns:
MG13:



MG-30:


MG-34:


MG08/15:


Heavy Machine Guns:
MG08:


MG14:


MG131:



Other:
Panzerbuchse 39


Granatbuschse 39:

 
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The Yak series of fighter planes would be developed by an aircraft engineer named Aleksandr Yakovlev as part of the modernization program for the Russian Air Force in the late 1930s. The first of them, the Yak-1, would enter service in December of 1939, before and during the war the Yakovlev fighter line would see some major changes. Notably in the Yak-1M, Yak-9, and Yak-3 fighters, which would by the end of 1942, would make up the backbone of the Russian fighter forces. There would also be the Yak-7, which was originally intended as a trainer aircraft, but many would be converted to the fighter role. A total of 28,000 airframes between the four models in the whole fighter line would be manufactured between 1939 and 1948 and it's operators would include the Imperial Russia, Alaska, the Socialist Russian State, Georgia, the Ukraine, Finland, Mongolia, China, and Azerbaijan.
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A Yak-1M belonging to the 67th Georgian Fighter Division (as noted by the Georgian word for dasher and the cross of Saint Nino) on the Caucasus Front, circa Summer of 1943. This unit would one of the best Russian air units on that front against the Ottomans and would continue to fight the Ottomans after the official Russian surrender, their last sortie being made on June 14th, 1944.
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A Yak-3 that flown by the Russian fighter ace Kirill Yevtigneyev (note the St. George's Cross mural,) based somewhere near Smolensk, circa April of 1944. The Yak-3 would prove to be finest warplane in the Russian arsenal during the Second Great War, however only a small number would see combat during the conflict, making the plane to be the last Russian aircraft to enter service during the war. However the plane would see heavy use during the Siberian War against the Japanese, and would ultimately serve on with the Russian People's Air Force until being replaced by the MiG turbos in 1955.
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A Yak-9D fighter from the 2nd Fighter Division on the Karelian Front, circa November of 1943. The Yak-9, being based on the Yak-7, was the most numerous model of the Yak fighter line, with 13,633 airframes.

(edited for Rule reasons.)
 
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