TL-191 Uniform, weapons and equipment of the Secondary Combatants.

My take on German weapons of the Second Great War

Pistols:
Luger Model 1908:

Mauser C96: (issued to Pilots who could use it as a survival weapon)

Walther PP: (Officer's Sidearm, also issued to Stormtroopers)



Submachine Guns:
Schmeisser MP18/28:


Erma EMP35:



Rifles:
Mauser Gewehr 98:


Mauser Gewehr Karabiner 98k:


Mauser Model 1916 Self-Loader;



Light Machine Guns:
MG13:



MG-30:


MG-34:


MG08/15:


Heavy Machine Guns:
MG08:


MG14:


MG131:



Other:
Panzerbuchse 39


Granatbuschse 39:

I personalize think in a world where Germany won WWI that a lot of German weapons would be either more advanced by the late 1930's or butterflied away.

BTW S. Marlowski there is a three pic per day limit, if you keep posting large numbers of pics in one day the Mods will be very unhappy with you.
 
Now for some British Aircraft
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A Hawker Hurricane Mk. II from the No. 37 Fighter Squadron on the Western Front during the Invasion of the Netherlands, circa June of 1941. From 1937 to early 1942, the Hawker Hurricane fighter would be the mainstay of the Royal Air Force. By 1942, the type would be supplanted by the Supermarine Spitfire, but would continue on the air support role until being replaced by the Hawker Typhoon in early 1944. The aircraft would be widely exported before the war, notably to Greece, Spain, Portugal, Albania, Persia, Argentina, Mexico, Australia, South Africa, Romania, and Finland. During the war, a substantial number would be supplied to the French and Russian air forces as well a single example given to the Confederate Air Force for evaluation in September of 1940 which would end up being captured by Union forces in Richmond at the end of the SGW in 1944 and is now on display at the USAF Museum in Dayton.
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A Supermarine Spitfire Mk. XIV from No. 607 Fighter Squadron based at RAF Duxford, circa June of 1944. In 1942, the British would develop a new powerplant for their planes which was the Rolls Royce Griffin engine, but the first Spitfire variants to mount it would prove to have a poor performance. In late 1943, engineers at Rolls Royce and at Supermarine would refine the new powerplant, the result as the Mk. XIV variant. 2,000 were planned to enter operational service by June of 1944, unfortunately only a small part of the order would be fulfilled due to material shortages due to the worsening war situation and the non-stop German bombing raids on British industrial centers. Fewer still would ever see operational service due to fuel shortages that was affecting the British Isles. However, the Mark XIV would still prove to a deadly fighter in the hands of capable pilots, most notably with Raymond Harries, who had managed to shoot down 7 German planes with his Mark XIV.
 
I personalize think in a world where Germany won WWI that a lot of German weapons would be either more advanced by the late 1930's or butterflied away.
I would propose, as a counter, that one need only look at the Allied weaponry of WWII, particularly that used by the USSR, UK and Early-war US, most of which was either WWI Surplus or immediately post-war.
It stands to reason that the armies that weren't forced to rebuild from the ground up (ala the TTL Germans post WWI) would be the ones using a lot of "legacy" equipment. Hence why, for example, the US is still using the GWI Barrels to fight the Mormons in the books. the Depression would also have impacted the development of new equipment by those powers that weren't seeking retribution.
 
I would propose, as a counter, that one need only look at the Allied weaponry of WWII, particularly that used by the USSR, UK and Early-war US, most of which was either WWI Surplus or immediately post-war.
It stands to reason that the armies that weren't forced to rebuild from the ground up (ala the TTL Germans post WWI) would be the ones using a lot of "legacy" equipment. Hence why, for example, the US is still using the GWI Barrels to fight the Mormons in the books. the Depression would also have impacted the development of new equipment by those powers that weren't seeking retribution.
Fair enough I still think weapons like the MG-34/42, MP-40 and probably a semi-auto-rifle would've been introduced earlier, the Germans had also came to the conclusion that an intermediate round would be better than the full size rifle round of the day during the first World War so I think its possible that an assault rifle might have been introduced earlier than OTL as well but that's just MO.

And dude your posting way too many pics in one day, its only a matter of time before the Mods come down on you for it.
 

Here is a drawing that I made recently which about the uniforms of the KuK and Ukrainian Armies. For the KuK Soldier, I had used elements from the OTL WWII era Hungarian and Czechoslovak Uniforms as well as having an M. 1922 Mauser (OTL vz. 24). For the Ukrainian soldier, it was mainly inspired from the Ukrainian Partisans of WWII with some other equipment from other militaries of the time thrown in.

And here's their descriptions that I made about them from my recently posted DeviantArt post about them.
The soldier on the left as the caption says is a Slovak Infantryman from the KuK Army during the Siege of Lemberg in 1941. His equipment includes a camouflaged M. 38 Stahlhelm, M. 1930 field blouse, leather belt with a Y strap, M. 1922 ammo pouches, entrenching tool and a bayonet frog attached it it, a breadbag to his left side, a metal gas mask container, tall marching boots, and an M. 1922 Steyr-Mauser rifle. As shown off to the side, the M. 38 helmet had some decals on it, which had on the right the national colors of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, and to the left, whatever coat of arms the soldier originated from, in this man's case, he is from Slovakia.

The soldier on the right is a Ukrainian soldier during the Battle of Kiev in 1941. His equipment includes in Austrian M. 38 Stahlhelm, a Ukrainian style fieldcap, M1936 Field Blouse with a civilian Vyshyvanka worn underneath, leather belt with an M. 95 ammo pouch set and an entrenching tool attached, an M24 hand grenade tucked into his belt, jackboots, breadbag, a metal gas mask container, and a Steyr-Mannlicher M. 95 long rifle.
 
Even more aircraft, now of the French, Dutch, and KuK Air Forces:

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A Dewoitine D. 520 fighter belonging to the 15th Spanish Volunteer Fighter Squadron on the Western Front near Strasbourg, circa 1941.
During the early days of the Second Great War, the Falangist Dictator of Spain, Jose Antonio de Riveria in support for the Radius cause would send volunteers to fight in the French Army which was known as the Blue Division. There would also be the Blue Squadron which serve in the French Air Force, which they would use the Morane Saulnier MS 406 and Dewoitine D. 520 fighters as well as the Breguet Br 693 light bomber. The squadron would rack up a total of 112 air kills against the Kaiserliche Luftwaffe in return for a loss of 20 pilots, either killed, missing, or captured.

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A Koolhoven F.K. 58 fighter belonging to the 41st Ruthenian Fighter Squadron from the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Corps in Galicia, circa September 1941.
In the late 1930s, the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force would order from the Dutch firm Koolhoven for a cheap to manufacture fighter in the event of war if their own aviation production could not keep up with the potential war time demands. The first prototype would be tested by the KuK Army Air Corps in April 1939, and they would approve the design for production by Koolhoven as well as some components produced by some subcontractors throughout the Empire. By June of 1941, a total of 98 airframes would be in service with the KuK Army Air Service. The plane would feature a Pratt & Whitney 1830 Twin Wasp engine and four 7.9mm Schwarzlose M. 1934 machine-guns and was built of mixed construction. Following the invasion of Holland in 1941, no new planes would enter service with the KuK Air Force and the type would see heavy use on the Eastern Front against the Russians and by early 1942, the survivors would be retired and were scrapped.

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A Fokker D. XXI of the Dutch Army Air Force during the Radius Invasion of the Netherlands, circa June of 1941.
In 1935, the German-Dutch firm Fokker would develop a new modern fighter, which featured an enclosed cockpit, fixed landing gear, and two machine guns. Though the design would be rejected by the Kaiserliche Luftwaffe in favor of the Junkers Ju-22 fighter, but the plane would be a big hit with smaller air forces such as the Austro-Hungarian, Baltic Duchy, Ukraine, White Ruthenia, Finland, Ottoman Empire, Ethiopia, Paraguay, Holland, Denmark, Albania, China, Spain, and Bulgaria. The USAAC would evaluate the plane in 1937 and had even considered license production of the fighter for their own air force, but it would be rejected in favor of the Curtiss Model 75. The fighter would see heavy use in the early days of the Second Great War on the Eastern Front and during the Invasion of Holland, where they proved to be outclassed by the Russian Polikarpov I-16 and Yakovlev Yak-1 and the British Hurricane fighters. In Austro-Hungarian service, the type would be replaced by newer and more advanced designs such as the Ju-22, L.W. 175, Avia B. 135, and Avia B. 75 by the middle of 1942. Others such as the Danish and the Finnish would continue to use them in frontline service until the late 1940s.
 
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AFV's of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. Pt. 4

IP-V medium barrel armed with the 75mm M-43 L/46 cannon. The IP-V was the first AH barrel to employ welded and sloped armour, heavily influenced by both German and Russian barrels the IP-V Panzer was capable of dealing with all but the heaviest of Russian barrels and barrel busters. The IP-V continued into production after the war and many were sold to third world nations in the early to mid 1950's.
IP-V Tas-44.jpg


IP-V Jagdfass barrel buster derived from the the IP-V and armed with a copy of the Russian 85mm gun the Jagdfass V was one of the best AFV's of the Second Great war and many captured vehicles were used by the Russians near the end of the war.
IP-V Tas-Jagdfass w 85mm.jpg
 
technically, all of Hungary AND Czechoslovakia's weapons and AFV's fall into the Austro-Hungarian sphere, so theoretically anything they used TL-191 Austro-Hungary could use (hence why my Barrel drawing gave them the Turan and LT-38 tanks)
 
Crossposting from the Images of TL-191 Thread.

A painting of Imperial Russian soldiers loading a Katyusha Rocket Launcher during the Second Battle of Kiev, circa 1943. During the Second Great War, the Katyusha artillery system was one of the more formidable weapons in Russia's arsenal, which Russians troops nicknamed the weapon as the "Tsar's Organ."
 
One thing about the Imperial Russian Army that I think about for this setting...

I have this idea that the Russians paint religious quotes or slogans on their tanks and planes, as well as art of Othodox icons and saints. So, for example, instead of "For Stalin!" we get "For God and the Tsar!" or "Saint Michael Protects Us!". Almost like their soldiers are going off on some 20th Century crusade.

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For planes, as a contrast to American pin ups, we get nose art of saints painted on the fuselages of quite a few Russian aircraft. With the Tsar still in power and with many people in Russia still staunchly orthodox, perhaps this could be a contrast to the communist slogans and art you typically see.
 
When I get back to making more Russian aircraft, perhaps I'll have some that on there. Heck, for my Georgian Yak-1, there was the image of the cross of St. Nino on it.
 
When I get back to making more Russian aircraft, perhaps I'll have some that on there. Heck, for my Georgian Yak-1, there was the image of the cross of St. Nino on it.
That would look good. I believe that within the armed forces of Russia in this timeline the soldiers, tankers, pilots, and sailors would all still be very much religious especially with institutions of the Tsar still around. Faith was a powerful motivator and a source of unity and morale for Russian soldiers back then.
 
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