List of Alternate Presidents and PMs II

Something I've had on my harddrive and been kicking around for a while. Enjoy.

Two-thirds Is Enough

1968–1979: Pierre Trudeau (Liberal)
1979–1980: Joe Clark (Progressive Conservative)
1980–1984: Pierre Trudeau (Liberal)
1984–1991: Joe Clark (Progressive Conservative)

def. 1984 (maj.): Pierre Trudeau (Liberal), Ed Broadbent (New Democratic)
def. 1988 (min.): Donald Johnston (Liberal), Ed Broadbent (New Democratic)


66.9% was not a rousing endorsement of his leadership, but Joe Clark and his advisers decided it was enough support to stay on as leader— resigning and running in the subsequent leadership election was mooted, but ultimately rejected as "too clever by half". Of course, a relatively small mandate hardly silenced his critics— particularly those in the rank-and-file who believed he was too moderate— but for all the public sniping, Clark remained entrenched in his position. He was the leader of the Progressive Conservative Party, and he would be taking it into the next election… he just needed to bring the party in-line first.

With Clark's on-going leadership problems, Trudeau is convinced to make one last run under the belief that since he beat Clark once, he could do it again. This does not pan out, and Clark wins a comfortable majority and, most notably, makes a breakthrough in Quebec with some dozen seats.

Cognizant of the changing ground in his party, Clark governed a bit more to the right during his second term, though his Red Tory instincts show through; concerns over full and unrestricted free trade limited a negotiated deal with the United States to a general reduction of tariffs and free trade only in certain sectors. The deal won bipartisan support— the Liberals' (now under Donald Johnston) only criticism is that doesn't go far enough— and passed without incident. Clark's major pursuit was a "flexible federalism" meant to both engage Quebec and address western concerns, which— after a series of meetings with fellow first ministers— evolved into a package of constitutional reforms dubbed the Harrington Accord (after the location it was finalized, the prime minister's summer residence).

The Accord's main features were to devolve more powers to the provincial governments— exclusive jurisdiction over natural resources, increased involvement in immigration, and allowing provinces to "opt-out", with full compensation, of a federal program to establish a provincial one— in exchange for full "harmonization" in certain policy areas (such as telecommunications, trade and labour), Senate reform that expanded its size (every province getting 12 seats, except Ontario and Quebec which remained at 24) and culled its power, and recognition of Quebec as a "distinct society" alongside similar clauses for linguistic minority communities across Canada.

The opposition was initially unsure what to make of the Accord. The New Democrats had concerns with the harmonized policy, but ultimately endorsed it, citing increased provincial powers and easier intra-Canada movement of people. The Liberals had a very tough time: Leader Johnston is staunchly opposed for how it weakens the federal government, but most of his MPs— representing Quebec ridings— support it for its cultural provisions, causing tension. Trudeau emerged from his quiet retirement to fiercely denounce the Accord, intending to throw his weight behind Johnston and bring the party in line, but instead only opened the party up to perceptions of having not moved on from his leadership.

Although the Accord could only be ratified by provincial legislatures, it nevertheless became the defining issue of the 1988 election. The Liberals attempt to adopt an ambiguous position but are widely known as the "anti-Accord" party, which results in major losses in Quebec— the Conservatives winning a majority of seats for the first time since John Diefenbaker— but does manage gains in English Canada— including a small rebirth in the western provinces. The vote split in such a way that Clark falls just short of a majority… but support from the New Democrats ensured the Accord's passage. Looking to put it behind them, the Liberals swiftly replace Johnston with the pro-Harrington Raymond Garneau.


1991–2001: Raymond Garneau (Liberal)
def. 1991 (maj.): Joe Clark (Progressive Conservative), Dave Barrett (New Democratic)
def. 1994 (maj.): Roch La Salle (Progressive Conservative), Dave Barrett (New Democratic), Raymond Speaker (Representative)
def. 1998 (maj.): Dennis Timbrell (Progressive Conservative), Dave Barrett (New Democratic), Raymond Speaker (Representative)


Clark's government navigated the minority situation surprisingly well, but ultimately fell in '91. In the subsequent election, Clark tried to run on the success and popularity of the Harrington Accord, but Garneau— aware his that his party was bitterly divided on it, "settled" or not— refused to play ball. He opted to simply ignore the Accord and turn his— and voters'— attention to the economy, the deficit and debt and other areas of fiscal responsibility; and with Canada undergoing a recession, it resonated with the public. Garneau won in a landslide, even improving his fortunes in western Canada some. His government went right to work on balancing the budget through a combination of more efficient taxes and budget cuts.

Garneau's reforms are not very popular with the public, but the Conservatives are in no position to provide opposition. Clark's had always had his detractors within his party, but forming government was enough to hold the party together; his resignation, then, revealed the cracks: not just the old Red vs Blue, but establishment vs grassroots, as well as regional tensions between the new, large, electorally important Quebec wing and a western stronghold that's feeling increasingly ignored and taken advantage of. In an effort to mend the gap, delegates back former industry minister Roch La Salle— a Clark ally and Quebec nationalist, but decidedly on the right of the party— but it just alienated everyone. Quebecers, while admiring his nationalist credentials, are put off by his hardline ideological stances; Clark's strongest supporters, of a Red Tory bent, are likewise not enthused; while westerners just don't trust a Quebec nationalist to work in their interests.

Garneau called a snap election to capitalize on the Conservatives' struggles, and the gamble paid off: not only did the Liberals increase their majority, but the Conservatives fragmented as their western base desert the party— heading not just to their typical western opponent the New Democrats, but also the upstart Representative Party. La Salle was quickly booted and replaced by Dennis Timbrell, moderate Blue Tory from Ontario, who set about repairing and rebuilding the party's base— namely by halting the courtship of Quebec and refocusing on Ontario and the West.

The next few years is the story of three parties trying to position themselves as the best voice for western Canada (with the Liberals occasionally joining in, mostly to stir the pot) while the Liberals operate largely without meaningful opposition; during this period, Garneau pursued the century-old Liberal dream of "reciprocity"— free trade with the United States— with it coming into effect on January 1, 2001.

By then, Garneau felt he had achieved a laudable legacy— rebuilding his party, eliminating the deficit, and free trade with the United States— and decided to retire from public life.


2001–2009: Ralph Klein (Liberal)
def. 2001 (maj.): Dennis Timbrell (Progressive Conservative), Piers McDonald (New Democratic), Raymond Speaker (Representative)
def. 2005 (maj.): Dennis Timbrell (Progressive Conservative), Piers McDonald (New Democratic), Garry Breitkreuz (Representative)


The moment Ralph Klein entered Parliament, he was a star, and his shine only got brighter from there. As Garneau's "western lieutenant", he held considerable sway in cabinet and received several high-profile posts (natural resources, industry and public safety); by the turn of the millennium, Klein was the de facto number two in government. It was only natural, then, that he became the number one after Garneau's retirement.

That is not to say that Klein was welcomed in all quarters of the party. Like Garneau, Klein was from the right wing of the party, and the succession of two right-wingers in a row was met with disappointment and concern from the left wing. In order to keep them on side and not bolt to the NDP— who had experienced steady growth throughout the 90s— Klein shifted to the left, pledging to increase funding for health care, increase payouts for social security programs, and— in a notable reversal— recognize same-sex "civil unions". Additionally, the Deputy Prime Minister role was revived and assigned to Art Eggleton, Klein's nearest leadership challenger and champion of the left.

Klein's pivot was not entirely convincing, but it was enough to keep much of his party in line. And so, with his base stable and riding high in his honeymoon period, Klein called a snap election to refresh and cement his mandate. The election was another Liberal rout; although the Conservatives made notable gains in Ontario, the Representatives collapsed: seeing a right-leaning westerner in the top job rather undermined their "The West Wants In" slogan, reducing them to their stalwart base and allowing the Liberals to make huge gains in urban Alberta and Saskatchewan.

With a mandate of his own, Klein governed as he had promised— and little more. While he fulfilled his pledges to boost health care transfers et al, his left-wing policies largely stopped at additional funding and tinkering around the edges; Klein's instincts remained fiscally conservative, and he remained committed to holding spending steady and delivering balanced budgets. Modest surpluses were held onto or used to pay down the debt rather that reinvested, to the frustration of the more left-wing Liberals. Klein was more amiable to moving on social issues: after various provincial courts started ruling that barring same-sex marriage was unconstitutional, Klein was persuaded by Eggleton to get ahead of the issue and legalize it nationwide in 2005— a timely sop to the activist wing before the impending election.

But the biggest conflict Klein had was over environmental policy. As the decade wore on and evidence continued to mount about anthropogenic climate change, there were increasing calls to enact tighter environmental regulations, move to "green" technology and reduce carbon emissions, and otherwise move to a low carbon economy. Klein, however, was a proud Albertan and staunch proponent of Alberta's oil industry, and had worked— as natural resource minister and later as prime minister— to further develop and exploit them, and brushed off any suggestion to limit it, arguing that oil was good for Canada's economy. Klein made some token efforts to combat pollution more generally, and announced initiatives and subsidies to support clean energy, but continued to support the oil sands. It was too much for the left flank to bear, and in the next election they broke for the more environmentally conscious opposition.


2009–2019: Elizabeth May (Progressive Conservative)
def. 2009 (maj.): Ralph Klein (Liberal), Piers McDonald (New Democratic), Garry Breitkreuz (Representative)
def. 2014 (min.): Denis Coderre (Liberal), Gilles Bisson (New Democratic), Shayne Saskiw (Representative)
def. 2016 (maj.): Denis Coderre (Liberal), Gilles Bisson (New Democratic), Shayne Saskiw (Representative)


In many ways, Elizabeth May was the opposite of Ralph Klein. But it wasn't just that she was the first female prime minister, that she was from the other side of the country (in fact, the first prime minister to come from Atlantic Canada since Borden), or even that she ran on a platform of environmental protection; the biggest change was her attitude. Where Klein was boorish (in a charming way) and ran a tightly-controlled, top-down government, May had a sunny demeanour and promised a more collaborative cabinet— "I will be a prime minister who is first among equals," is how she put it.

May may have honestly believed it, but it's equally true that her party situation more or less forced a conciliatory approach. The nearly two decades the Conservatives spent in the wilderness was hard on them; Clark's resignation saw the party descend into factional infighting and split apart, and Timbrell spent a decade working to mend the divide. Timbrell's strategy wasn't just an ideological rethink— of finding common ground— but also included institutional reform to commit a Conservative government to implement policy passed by its membership, and to give MPs the ability to challenge and oust a leader. Thus, a party leader could no longer ride roughshod over opponents, lest they be unceremoniously ousted; they would have to work with opponents and keep them happy.

Consequently, May's cabinet was a Lincolnesque "team of rivals", comprising tories red (Bill Casey) and blue (Lewis MacKenzie); Quebec nationalists (Joseph Facal) and traditional bleus (Sébastien Proulx); and westerners both populist (Stockwell Day) and libertarian (Keith Martin). Moreover, May granted her ministers a degree of independence; although they had certain mandates they had to achieve, they were otherwise allowed to handle the portfolio and enact policy as they saw fit. This decision had mixed results: while ministers themselves were happy to have their own personal fiefs, it also meant ministers often came into conflict, leaving May to play referee and giving the impression of a very chaotic government. In the most notable instance, May's government enacted an emissions-trading program and tightened environmental protection laws, while also approving the EnergyEast pipeline and championing Quebec's asbestos industry.

The apparent chaos and contradictions saw the Conservatives' support shrink, and in the 2014 election they were returned with a narrow minority— saved by May's personal popularity and tireless campaigning. This, however, gave May the opportunity to restore a more top-down leadership, reign in her ministers and present a more unified vision. Over the next couple years, May pivoted to placing emphasis on tradition, nationalist sentiment, and provincial autonomy, and cobbled together an unlikely coalition of red tories, western populists and Quebec bleus; when the country went back to the polls in 2016, the re-energized Conservatives thundered back with a majority.

With both a majority and a stronger control over her party, May set about pushing her vision further: heavily investing in green technology and proclaiming her party to be "stewards of the environment", enacting a series of tax credits and programs targeting young families, tightening abortion laws and banning sex-selective abortions. A series of wildfires that ripped through western Canada also led to a large relief program to provide aid to affected families and rebuild the communities.

May stepped down in 2019, citing her age and a desire to spend more time with her family.


2019–2020: Pierre Karl Péladeau (Progressive Conservative)
2020–present: Filomena Tassi (Liberal)

def. 2020 (C&S): Pierre Karl Péladeau (Progressive Conservative), Gilles Bisson (New Democratic), Shayne Saskiw (Representative)

Although he was absent from May's first cabinet— still, then, a political neophyte albeit a star candidate— he quickly emerged as a key ally in her struggles to bring the party behind her; by the time of her retirement, Péladeau had positioned himself as her natural successor. Pélandeau was not in lockstep with May, but as a man of nebulous (perhaps flexible) ideology, Péladeau was arguably best situated to holding together the new base— or at least holding most of it as it as it shifted slightly under his tenure. If anything could be pinned down about Péladeau, it's that he was a proud Quebecer and staunch nationalist; though not necessarily a Quebec nationalist, he had sympathies with that faction and sought to bring them closer into the Conservative tent, with the larger goal of establishing Conservative dominance in the province.

Péladeau's emphasis on "cultural issues"— namely immigration and immigrants— did indeed play well in his home province, as the Conservatives increased their seat count and beat the Liberals into second place; however, it played less well in the rest of Canada— particularly Ontario— which more than cancelled out the gains. However, the coalition was still resilient enough to keep the Conservatives the largest party, even without their majority.

But for all Péladeau and the Conservatives took this as a rousing endorsement and mandate to remain in office, it was not so. Not too long after the election, Filomena Tassi and Gilles Bisson— leaders of the Liberals and NDP, respectively— held a joint press conference announcing that they had signed a four-year confidence-and-supply agreement, and would be voting down the government's throne speech with the intent of having the Liberals form a government. The Conservatives raged and denounced the "coup", but arithmetic, parliamentary procedure and— most importantly— public opinion disagreed, and soon enough Tassi was moving in to 24 Sussex.

Filomena Tassi was a bit of a newcomer to federal politics, but had a long career behind her. First elected as an MPP in 1995, she went on to serve as a minister in the Gerard Kennedy government in multiple portfolios, including labour, health and infrastructure. After the Kennedy government's defeat in 2013, she moved to federal politics for the 2014 election and quickly became a prominent member of the opposition; after Coderre's resignation, she was encouraged to enter the race and ran away with it. Though often regarded as being on the right of the party due to her views on abortion, her economic views place her on the left.

The Liberal–NDP agreement commits the government to an ambitious agenda that includes establishing a national pharmacare program, strengthening labour laws and granting public sectors the right to strike, and "pursuing" electoral reform. Tassi is an accomplished politician, but even she will have her work cut out for her. The next four years will be interesting indeed…


Abridged list:

15. Pierre Trudeau (1968–1979)
16. Joe Clark (1979–1980)
(15). Pierre Trudeau (1980–1984)
(16). Joe Clark (1984–1991)
17. Raymond Garneau (1991–2001)
18. Ralph Klein (2001–2009)
19. Elizabeth May (2009–2019)
20. Pierre Karl Péladeau (2019–2020)
21.
Filomena Tassi (2020–present)
I’m late, but I really like this, particularly the way you’ve wrote Klein. So often a lot of us (myself included) fall into the trap of writing him as the cartoonish caricature he’s since been remembered as, so it’s nice to see a more layered portrayal. Him governing as a progressive on social issues is also one of those fun things you don’t usually see, and the way you explain it makes it perfectly plausible as well.
 
I’m late, but I really like this, particularly the way you’ve wrote Klein. So often a lot of us (myself included) fall into the trap of writing him as the cartoonish caricature he’s since been remembered as, so it’s nice to see a more layered portrayal. Him governing as a progressive on social issues is also one of those fun things you don’t usually see, and the way you explain it makes it perfectly plausible as well.
Thanks! Yeah, I think Klein is a bit more complex than his legacy would suggest. Klein considered himself a Liberal until he entered provincial politics in '89— meaning he considered himself a Liberal through the NEP!— and after that, became more conservative over time; reading between the lines, I would suggest his evolution had a lot to do with ambition. So in a situation where he stays with the Liberals, I would expect his views to soften accordingly, to ensure he remains a leading voice rather than a fringe figure. Though he's still very much a Blue Grit ITTL, as you can see.
 
Is this cursed? Maybe. Do I care? Eh

Presidents of the United States of America, Part I: 1961 - 1981

1961 - 1969:
Vice President Richard Nixon (Republican)

1960 (with Henry Cabot Lodge Jr.) def. Senator John F. Kennedy (Democratic), Senator Harry F. Byrd (Dixiecrat)
1964 (with Stuart Symington) def. Senator Hubert Humphrey (Democratic), Governor George Wallace (Dixiecrat), other Dixiecrat faithless electors


1969 - 1977: Senator Eugene McCarthy (Democratic)
1968 (with Russell B. Long) def. Senator Thruston Morton (Republican), Fmr. Governor George Wallace (States' Rights)
1972 (with Russell B. Long) def. Senator Barry Goldwater (Republican)


1977 - 1981: Senator James L. Buckley (Conservative-Republican)
1976 (with Gerald Ford) def. Vice President Russell B. Long (Democratic), Senator Mike Mansfield (Americans for Peace and Democracy), Senator Charles Mathias (Independent)

1981 - present: Senator Birch Bayh (Democratic)
1980 (with Mario Biaggi) def. President James P. Buckley (Republican)
I came up with this based on my post in the Alternate Infobox thread. What do you all think?
 
41 Vicepresident George Herbert Walker Bush from Texas/ Indiana Senator James Danforth "Danny" Quayle 1989-1991
42 Vicepresident James Danforth "Danny" Quayle from Indiana/ Vacant 1991/ Tennessee Governor Andrew Lamar Alexander 1991-1993

def 1988 Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis/ Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen
43 Former California Governor Edmund Gerald "Jerry" Brown/ Civil Rights Leader Jesse Jackson Sr from Illinois 1993-1997
def President James Danforth "Danny" Quayle from Indiana/ Vicepresident Andrew Lamar Alexander from Tennessee, Businessman Henry Ross Perot from Texas/ Admiral James Stockdale from California
44 Former Vicepresident Andrew Lamar Alexander from Tennessee / Texas Rapresentative Thomas Dale DeLay 1997-2005
def 1996 President Edmund Gerald "Jerry" Brown from California/ Vicepresident Jesse Jackson Jr from Illinois, Businessman Henry Ross Perot from Texas/ Economist Pat Choate from Virginia
def 2000 Connecticut Joseph Isadore Lieberman/ Former Georgia Senator Samuel Augustus Nunn, Former Colorado Governor Richard "Dick" Lamm/ Former California Rapresentive Edward Zschau
45 North Carolina Senator Johnny Edwards/ Illinois Governor Rodney Blagojevich 2005-2009
def 2004 Vicepresident Thomas Dale DeLay from Texas/ New York Mayor Rudolph "Rudy" Giuliani, Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura/ Former Massachusetts Governor William "Bill" Weld
46 Tennessee Senator Byron Low Taxes Looper/ Businessman Herman Cain from Nebraska 2009-2012
Acting Presudent under 25th Amendament Vicepresident Herman Cain from Nebraska 2012-2013

def Rhode Island Senator Lincoln Chaffee/ Former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson, President Johnny Edwards from North Carolina/ Vicepresident Rodney Blagojevich from Illinois
47 {Former New York Mayor Michael "Mike" Bloomberg- Deceased} Admiral Michael Mullen from Ohio/Vacant 2013/ Rhode Island Senator Lincoln Chaffee 2013-2021
def 2012 Former Vermont Governor Howard Dean/ Massachusetts Senator John Forbes Kerry, President Byron Low Taxes Looper from Tennessee/ Vicepresident Herman Cain from Nebraska
def 2016 Massachusetts Senator John Forbes Kerry/ Former Speaker of the House Richard "Dick" Gephardt from Missouri, Indiana Rapresentatives Michael "Mike" Pence/ Oklahoma Senator Scott Pruitt
2020 Tickets:
Vicepresident Lincoln Chaffee from Rhode Island/ Secretary of State Jon Huntsman from Utah vs Minnesota Governor Norman Coleman/ Pennsylvania Rapresentative Joseph Sestak vs Former Florida Governor John Ellis "Jeb" Bush/ Former Arizona Senator Jeffrey "Jeff" Flake
 
41 Vicepresident George Herbert Walker Bush from Texas/ Indiana Senator James Danforth "Danny" Quayle 1989-1991
42 Vicepresident James Danforth "Danny" Quayle from Indiana/ Vacant 1991/ Tennessee Governor Andrew Lamar Alexander 1991-1993

def 1988 Massachusetts Governor Michael Dukakis/ Texas Senator Lloyd Bentsen
43 Former California Governor Edmund Gerald "Jerry" Brown/ Civil Rights Leader Jesse Jackson Sr from Illinois 1993-1997
def President James Danforth "Danny" Quayle from Indiana/ Vicepresident Andrew Lamar Alexander from Tennessee, Businessman Henry Ross Perot from Texas/ Admiral James Stockdale from California
44 Former Vicepresident Andrew Lamar Alexander from Tennessee / Texas Rapresentative Thomas Dale DeLay 1997-2005
def 1996 President Edmund Gerald "Jerry" Brown from California/ Vicepresident Jesse Jackson Jr from Illinois, Businessman Henry Ross Perot from Texas/ Economist Pat Choate from Virginia
def 2000 Connecticut Joseph Isadore Lieberman/ Former Georgia Senator Samuel Augustus Nunn, Former Colorado Governor Richard "Dick" Lamm/ Former California Rapresentive Edward Zschau
45 North Carolina Senator Johnny Edwards/ Illinois Governor Rodney Blagojevich 2005-2009
def 2004 Vicepresident Thomas Dale DeLay from Texas/ New York Mayor Rudolph "Rudy" Giuliani, Minnesota Governor Jesse Ventura/ Former Massachusetts Governor William "Bill" Weld
46 Tennessee Senator Byron Low Taxes Looper/ Businessman Herman Cain from Nebraska 2009-2012
Acting Presudent under 25th Amendament Vicepresident Herman Cain from Nebraska 2012-2013

def Rhode Island Senator Lincoln Chaffee/ Former New Mexico Governor Gary Johnson, President Johnny Edwards from North Carolina/ Vicepresident Rodney Blagojevich from Illinois
47 {Former New York Mayor Michael "Mike" Bloomberg- Deceased} Admiral Michael Mullen from Ohio/Vacant 2013/ Rhode Island Senator Lincoln Chaffee 2013-2021
def 2012 Former Vermont Governor Howard Dean/ Massachusetts Senator John Forbes Kerry, President Byron Low Taxes Looper from Tennessee/ Vicepresident Herman Cain from Nebraska
def 2016 Massachusetts Senator John Forbes Kerry/ Former Speaker of the House Richard "Dick" Gephardt from Missouri, Indiana Rapresentatives Michael "Mike" Pence/ Oklahoma Senator Scott Pruitt
2020 Tickets:
Vicepresident Lincoln Chaffee from Rhode Island/ Secretary of State Jon Huntsman from Utah vs Minnesota Governor Norman Coleman/ Pennsylvania Rapresentative Joseph Sestak vs Former Florida Governor John Ellis "Jeb" Bush/ Former Arizona Senator Jeffrey "Jeff" Flake
Lemme guess. President Looper, fearing that he would lose re-election, orders the assassination of Mike Bloomberg. Under the 25th amendment, the majority of the Cabinet votes to remove Looper from office.
 
Lemme guess. President Looper, fearing that he would lose re-election, orders the assassination of Mike Bloomberg. Under the 25th amendment, the majority of the Cabinet votes to remove Looper from office.
But Herman Cain would not be an "Acting President" in this scenario. Any VP that takes the position of President (be it removed from office, death, resignation) is still a POTUS.
 
Lemme guess. President Looper, fearing that he would lose re-election, orders the assassination of Mike Bloomberg. Under the 25th amendment, the majority of the Cabinet votes to remove Looper from office.
Exactly: Looper orders Bloomberg's assassination in last days of campaign, hoping to remove his more dangerous rival. Instead this boosts Reform ticket popularity, resulting in a landslide for deceased Bloomberg (it's too late to remove the name from the ballots) and his running mate, Admiral Mullen. Looper try to keep the power but, with his crimes revealed, he's removed by the Cabinet and the Congress under 25th Amendament and arrested. He will avoid the sentence dying during the trial in 2013, prompting many conspiracy theories.

But Herman Cain would not be an "Acting President" in this scenario. Any VP that takes the position of President (be it removed from office, death, resignation) is still a POTUS.
The 25th Amendament doesn't work in this way: if the majority of the Cabinet and the Congress recognize the President as unable to perform his duties (because he is ill, mad, mental unfit, under surgical operation, traumatized, blackmailed or other) the Vicepresident becomes Acting President for a while, until it's decided if the inability is permanent or not. If yes, the VP takes the oath as new President, but not before. In this case, Cain serves as Acting President few weeks during the transition due Looper removal.
 
1979 - 1985: Margaret Thatcher (CON)
1979: CON (Thatcher) 339 seats, 43.9%; LAB (Callaghan) 269 seats, 36.9%; LIB (Steel) 11 seats, 13.8%

1983: CON (Thatcher) 397 seats, 42.4%; LAB (Foot) 209 seats, 27.6%; ALL (Steel & Jenkins) 23 seats, 25.4%

1985 - 1993: Geoffrey Howe (CON)
1986: CON (Howe) 315 seats, 34.3%; LAB (Kinnock) 239 seats, 29.9%; ALL (Steel & Owen) 73 seats, 31.9%
1991: CON (Howe) 297 seats, 31.6%; LAB (Hattersley) 232 seats, 29.1%; SDP (Owen) 58 seats, 18.4%; LIB (Steel) 41 seats, 17.0%


1993 - 2004: Malcolm Rifkind (CON)
1995: CON (Rifkind) 291 seats, 31.7%; LAB (Benn) 217 seats, 28.0%; SDP (Owen) 87 seats, 21.1%; LIB (Beith) 32 seats, 15.2%

2000: CON (Rifkind) 283 seats, 31.3%; LAB (McDonnell) 204 seats, 27.7%; SDP (Mandelson) 113 seats, 22.7%; LIB (Beith) 25 seats, 13.8%

2004 - 2007: David Lidington (CON)
2005: CON (Lidington) 277 seats, 31.0%; SDP (Mandelson) 183 seats, 25.9%; LAB (McDonnell) 148 seats, 25.3%; LIB (Campbell) 17 seats, 13.4%

2007 - Present: Peter Mandelson (SDP)
March 2007: SDP (Mandelson) 286 seats, 30.2%; CON (Lidington) 235 seats, 29.7%; LAB (Corbyn) 91 seats, 23.3%; LIB (Campbell) 14 seats, 12.5%

December 2007: SDP (Mandelson) 326 seats, 34.8%; CON (Fox) 224 seats, 30.6%; LAB (Corbyn) 63 seats, 18.3%, LIB (Hughes) 13 seats, 11.9%
2011: SDP (Mandelson) 344 seats, 38.3%; CON (Duncan) 229 seats, 31.2%; LAB (Trickett) 37 seats, 14.1%; LIB (Carmichael) 15 seats, 12.1%
2016: SDP (Mandelson) 346 seats, 38.5%; CON (Duncan) 241 seats, 31.8%; LAB (Trickett) 21 seats, 13.1%; LIB (Carmichael) 16 seats, 12.3%
 
Presidents of the Free States of America
1861-1873: Abraham Lincoln/ John C. Frémont (Republican)
1861: Office established; unopposed
1864: Unopposed
1868: Winfield Scott Hancock/ Asa Parker (Democrat)

1873-1878: John C. Frémont/ Horace Greeley* (Republican)
1872: Charles Francis Adams/ Donald Kirkpatrick (American National)
1876: Charles Francis Adams/ Joel Parker (American National)
1878-1881: John C. Frémont/ vacant (Republican)
1881-1889: Frederick Douglass/ George F. Edmunds (Republican)
1880: Samuel J. Randall/ James B. Weaver (American National)
1884: Benjamin F. Butler/ John A. Brooks (American National)
1889-1893: James H. Kyle/ James B. Weaver (American National)
1888: George F. Edmunds/ James G. Blaine (Republican)
1893-1901: Robert Todd Lincoln/ Henry Clay Evans (Republican)
1892: James H. Kyle/ James B. Weaver (American National)
1897: Louis C. Hughes/ Thomas E. Wattson (American National)

1901-1909: William Jennings Bryan/ Daniel W. Lawler (American National)
1900: Milford W. Howard/ John W. Keller (Republican)
1904: George W. Carroll/ Thomas E. Watson (Republican)

1909-1915: Joseph G. Cannon*/ Leslie M. Shaw (Republican)
1908: Daniel W. Lawler/ George Gray (American National)

1912: Champ Clark/ Eugene Foss (American National)
1915-1921: Leslie M. Shaw/ vacant (Republican)
1921-1923: Henry Ford/ John Sharp Williams* (American National)
1920: Leslie M. Shaw/ Leonard Wood (Republican)
1923-1925: Henry Ford/ vacant (American National)
1925-1933: Henry Ford/ Oscar Underwood (American National)
1924: Hiram Johnson/ Frank Orren Lowden (Republican)
1928: Herman Ekern/ George W. Norris (Republican)
1933-1937: James Wolcott Wadsworth, Jr./ John J. Blaine (Republican)
1932: Henry Ford/ Oscar Underwood (American National)
1937-1945: Huey Long/ Burton K. Wheeler (Independent)
1936: James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr./ William Borah (Republican) and William Lemke/ Francis Townsend (American National)
1940: Robert A. Taft/ Dewey Jackson Short (Republican) and Scott W. Lucas (American National)

1945-1953: James Stewart/ Douglas MacArthur (American National)
1944: Charles Lindbergh/ Claude A. Watson (Republican) and Burton K. Wheeler/ Andrew N. Johnson
1948: George C. Marshall/ Humphrey Bogart (Republican)

1953-1961: Douglas MacArthur/ Charlie Chaplin (American National)
1952: Robert A. Taft/ Elmer A. Benson (Republican)
1956: Robert F. Wagner Jr./ Herman Talmadge (Republican)

1961-1966: Joseph P. Kennedy Jr.*/ Martin Luther King Jr. (Republican)
1960: Huey Long/ Wallace H. White Jr.(American Independent)
1964: Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr./ Hiram Fong (American National)

1966-1969: Martin Luther King Jr./ vacant (Republican)
1969-1981: Martin Luther King Jr./ Johnny Cash (Republican)

1968: Harold Hughes/ Paul C. Fisher (American National)
1972: Scott Kelly/ Paul C. Fisher (American National)
1976: Shirley MacLaine/ Cesar Chavez (American National)

1981-1989: Johnny Cash/ Ted Kennedy (Republican)
1980: Jim Jeffords/ Richard A. Snelling (American National)
1984: Robert Taft Jr./ William Saxbe (American National)

1989-1993: Ted Kennedy/ Donald Trump (Republican)
1988: Lenora Fulani/ Andre Marrou (American National)
1993-1996: Jeb Bush/ Channing E. Phillips (American National)
1992: James Stockdale/ Nancy Lord (Republican)
1996: Office abolished; as result of the FSA and CSA reuniting to become the USA


1. Died in Office
2. Assassinated by the Confederate States of America, officially entering the FSA into WW1
3. Died in Office
4. Resigned due to inability to hold office due to an assassination attempt, unconnected to the CSA

The 1860 United States Presidential Election is one of the most controversial elections in world history as it saw John C. Breckenridge win the Presidency via controversy as many would find issue with the electoral college and would call for a voting recount due to many voters for Breckenridge being dead but their cries would be ignored and with further fleeing slaves being forced back into slavery by bounty hunters would lead to the first state to secede from the Union. Eventually most of the North East states would secede from the Union and form a new country called the Free States of America. the FSA would officially abolish slavery in all states that joined it and would call itself the real America and what the founding fathers intended. Former candidate Abraham Lincoln would be unanimously be elected as the new President and would lead it through the first American Civil War. The war would end with the new FSA defeating the CSA (they renamed themselves to distant themselves from the USA which they previously shared with the FSA) with the recognition from Britain and France and their armies. The aftermath would see Washington D.C. be returned to the FSA and other territories being claimed by them. (Like the Dakota territory, Nebraska territory, Montana territory, Idaho territory, and Washington territory)The following years would see minor skirmishes between the two but nothing major till the election of Fredrick Douglass in 1880, the CSA would be appalled by this and would decry the FSA and start the second American Civil War, this time there were be no victor as both sides would be forced into a stalemate. Then came the first World War, Germany promised the CSA all of the former states the FSA had taken from them and would give them the new territories the FSA had claimed in the intervening years, thus on October 23, 1915 FSA President Joseph G. Cannon would assassinated by the CSA and plunge both countries into the first World War. The war would end in 1919 for the American people as the CSA surrendered to the FSA and would be forced to flee from their capital of Richmond and would make Dallas, Texas their new capital and would finally abolish slavery (very few states had slavery left with most of the country abandoning it during the mid to late 1890's) . However both countries would be hit hard by The Great Depression, President Huey Long would help bring the FSA out of the Depression while the CSA would linger until the start of the second World War when, for the first time since the 1860 election, the FSA and the CSA fought together in World War 2 as apart of the Allies and in 1945 would defeat the Axis Powers. The rivalry between the states had died down following their victory and would seem the two countries would actually start to get along again, then finally in 1996 the United States was reborn ironically by the meeting of the two Presidents brothers Jeb and George W. Bush.
 
1st Republic
Presidents of the Republic of Finland
1. 1919-1925 K. J. Ståhlberg (National Progressive Party)
2. 1925-1931 L. K. Relander (Agrarian League)
3. 1931-1937 P. E. Svinhufvud (National Coalition Party)
4. 1937-1940 Kyösti Kallio (Agrarian League)
5. 1940-1944 Risto Ryti (National Progressive Party)
6. 1944-1945 C. G. E. Mannerheim (Non-partisan)
7. 1945-1946/53 O. W. Kuusinen (United Socialist Party of Finland)
2nd Republic
Chairmen of the United Socialist Party of Finland
1. 1944-1961 O. W. Kuusinen
2. 1961-1987 Aimo Aaltonen
3. 1987-1989 Aarne Saarinen
4. 1989-1989 Kalevi Kivistö
3rd Republic
Presidents of the Republic of Finland
8. 1989-1995 Johannes Virolainen (Centre Party)
9. 1995-2001 Martti Ahtisaari (Social Democratic Party)
10. 2001-2013 Sauli Niinistö (National Union)
11. 2013-2025 Paavo Väyrynen (Centre Party)
Prime Ministers of Finland
19. 1989-1992 Harri Holkeri (Democratic Front)
20. 1992-1996 Paavo Väyrynen (Centre Party)
21. 1996-2000 Pertti Paasio (Social Democratic Party)
22. 2000-2001 Sauli Niinistö (National Union)
23. 2001-2008 Kari Häkämies (National Union)
24. 2008-2011 Paavo Lipponen (Social Democratic Party)
25. 2011-2012 Jutta Urpilainen (Social Democratic Party)
26. 2012-2018 Timo Soini (Centre Party)
27. 2018-2020 Juha Sipilä (Centre Party)
28. 2020-2024 Hjallis Harkimo (National Union)
 
No Nixon
1953-1961: Dwight D. Eisenhower/Everett Dirksen (R)

1952: def. Adlai Stevenson/John Sparkman (D)
1956: def. Adlai Stevenson/Estes Kefauver (D)

1961-1963: Everett Dirksen*/Thruston Morton (R)
1960: def. John F. Kennedy/Lyndon B. Johnson (D)
1963-1965: Thruston Morton/vacant (R)
1965-1969: Thruston Morton/Clare Boothe Luce (R)

1964: def. Hubert Humphrey/Robert F. Wagner Jr. (D) and Orval Faubus/George Wallace (Conservative)
1969-1977: John F. Kennedy/George McGovern (D)
1968: def. Thruston Morton/Clare Boothe Luce (R) and George Wallace/John C. Stennis (Conservative)
1972: def. Ronald Reagan/Margaret Chase Smith (R)

1977-1981: George McGovern/Robert F. Kennedy (D)
1976: def. Barry Goldwater/Kit Bond (R)
1981-1989: Phil Crane/Howard Baker (R)
1980: def. George McGovern/Robert F. Kennedy (D)
1984: def. Robert F. Kennedy/Gary Hart (D)

1989-1997: Joe Biden/Al Gore (D)
1988: def. Kit Bond/Kay Orr (R)
1992: def. Jack Kemp/Newt Gingrich (R) and Ross Perot/James Stockdale (I)

1997-2001: Newt Gingrich/John Engler (R)
1996: def. Al Gore/Bob Kerrey (D)
2001-2009: Dianne Feinstein/Bob Graham (D)
2000: def. Newt Gingrich/John Engler (R)
2004: def. Rick Santorum/Gordon H. Smith (R)

2009-2013: Sam Brownback/Carly Fiorina (R)
2008: def. Howard Dean/Evan Bayh (D)
2013-2017: Howard Dean/Debbie Stabenow (D)
2012: def. Sam Brownback/Carly Fiorina (R)
2017-present: Carly Fiorina/Phil Bryant (R)
2016: def. Howard Dean/Debbie Stabenow (D)
2020:
Carly Fiorina/Phil Bryant (R) vs. Kamala Harris/Joe Kennedy III (D)

*Assassinated

I've seen a few infoboxes with Nixon going into a career other than politics, so I made a quick "no Nixon" list.
 
Alternate Presidents in my timeline: A Circle of Cotton and Bloodshed:
1861-1869: George W.L. Bickley/John C. Breckinridge(S-D)
1869-1881: Andrew Johnson/James E. English(D)
1881-1885: John Sherman/James G. Blaine(NU)
1885-1893: Grover Cleveland/Allen G. Thurman(D)
1893-1897: William McKinley/Thomas B. Reed(NU)
1897-1905: Thomas B. Reed/James D. Cameron(NU)
1905-1913: George Dewey/Alton B. Parker(D)
1913-1920*: Charles E. Hughes/George L. Sheldon(NU)
1920-1925: George L. Sheldon(NU)
1925-1933: John W. Davis/Charles W. Bryan(D)
1933-1937: Walter F. George/Daniel Moody Jr.(D)
1937-1949: Alfred E. Smith/Huey P. Long(P)
1949-1953: Douglas MacArthur/Thomas Dewey(NU)
1953-1961: James Thurmond Sr./Henry A. Wallace(AF)
1961-1969: Earl Warren/John W. McCormack(P)
1969-1973: Nelson Rockefeller/Richard Nixon(NU)
1973-1975**: George W. Romney/James A. Rhodes(NU)
1975-1985: Martin Luther King Jr./Gerald Ford(NU)
1985-1989: Ellen McCormack/Robert Byrd(AF)
1989-1997: William J. Blythe III/Edmund G. Brown(AF)
1997-2001: Henry R. Perot/Timothy Penny(NU)
2001-2005: Harry Browne/Arthur C. Oliver(P)
2005-2013: John McCain III/Michael Bloomberg(NU)
2013-present: William H. Scott/Hillary Rodham(AF)
*President Hughes died of a stroke on June 11, 1920.
**President Romney and VP Rhodes were assassinated on March 28, 1975.
Note: The Republican and Democrat parties were renamed to the National Union and America First parties in 1864 and 1949, respectively.
 
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So after seeing this, I just wondered which would be the list of presidents should these guys have taken different careers...
1969-1977: Nelson Rockefeller
1977-1985: Jerry Brown
1985-1993: Bob Dole
1993-2001: Al Gore
2001-2009: John McCain
2009-2013: Joe Biden
2013-2021: Mitt Romney
2021-???: Bernie Sanders
 
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Presidents
37. 1969-1972: Richard M. Nixon (Republican) [1]
1968 (with Spiro Agnew) def.: Hubert Humphrey / Edmund Muskie (Democratic), George C. Wallace / Curtis LeMay (American Independent)
38. 1972-1972: Spiro Agnew (Republican) [2]
39. 1972-1972: Carl Albert (Democratic) [3]
40. 1972-1973: James O. Eastland (Democratic) [4]
41. 1973-1981: George C. Wallace (Democratic) [5]
1972 (with Shirley Chisholm) def.: Nelson Rockefeller / John Tower (Republican)
1976 (with Shirley Chisholm) def.: Mark Hatfield / John B. Anderson (Republican), Philip 'Phil' Crane / James L. Buckley (American Independent) [6]


[1] Assassinated by Arthur Bremer in Ottawa. Many view Nixon as a martyr and, ironically, as a Republican Kennedy.
[2] Pardoned himself on the charges of criminal conspiracy, bribery, extortion, and tax evasion, as well as kickbacks from his time as Baltimore County Executive and Governor of Maryland. This sparked massive outrage from the American people and even the Supreme Court which debated whether the President even had that ability. In the end, they - and Congress - said he didn't. Congress moved to impeach the President on grounds of high crimes and misdemeanors and dismissed Agnew from power.
[3] Killed in a drunk-driving incident in September 1972. Conspiracy theories still abound about the causes of his death
[4] While he (rightfully) viewed the American people as unaccepting of his position as President and accepted he was a lame-duck president, Eastland did take advantage of his being President during the 1972 election and his lame-duck period. He issued executive orders mandating school prayer, outlawing abortion in all instances, directing the FBI to investigate the "Communist-backed Black Power movement", and issued US governmental support for Rhodesia.
[5] His VP choice raised considerable numbers of eyebrows...
[6] Resurrected Wallace's American Independent Party in the hopes of restructuring it into a proper conservative party as the GOP slowly trended more and more socially liberal with nominating Rockefeller and Hatfield

GOP: ff9900
DEM: 0059b3
AIP: 00b300
 
List of Presidents of California
Analogous, and sometimes identical to, US Presidents
I didn't really think too much about why California is its own country or the broader global context. I figure there's a country called "north america" of northeastern and midwest states that developed like canada and is in the commonwealth of nations, and there's maybe an economically depressed "dixie". I dunno maybe Texas is its own country too.

Upton Sinclair - Labor 1933-1945
Longest serving socialist president, enacted the Pacific Deal and won the war with the Japanese
Earl Warren - Labor 1945-1953
Although praised by some for continuing his predecessor's policies, his legacy has been tarnished by the internment of the Japanese he oversaw as Sinclair's VP and Interior Secretary
George Patton - Conservative 1953-1961
Beloved general who won the war with the Japanese. Patton himself had moderate politics but he oversaw a dramatic conservative backlash and a red scare that broke apart the rival Labor party.

Barnard Yorba V - Liberal 1961-1963
The liberals were a third party and kingmaker for most of the twentieth century, consisting of high minded educated progressives and bourgeois professionals. They found a champion in Barnard Yorba V and an opportunity to fill a void with the marginalization of the labor party. Yorba himself was the descendant of a prominent Californio spanish family, and was therefore the first Catholic (and first of spanish heritage, although yorba was still white and aristocratic) president of the California republic. He was assassinated in 63
Alan Cranston - Liberal 1963-1969
Yorba's elderly and politically savvy vp signed important civil rights legislation and spearheaded antipoverty initiatives, but also got California involved in costly anticommunist pacific wars

Richard Nixon - Conservative (1969-1974)
Patton's VP and before that a red-baiting senator. A man of interesting contradictions, brilliant but corrupt. Resigned over the Hotel Figueroa break-in scandal.

Charles Herbert Dole- Conservative (1974-1977)
Younger son of the Dole fruit family and mild mannered Conservative representative, Nixon's unassuming VP.

Jerry Brown- Liberal (1977-1981)
Out-there environmentalist, derisively nicknamed "moonbeam". At first people liked him as a hip departure from the stodgy conservative years, but he rapidly lost popularity due to a poor economy.

Ronald Reagan - Conservative (1981-1989)
The former actor and arch-conservative governor of the Inland province, brought a sunny countenance to the office, although he went a little dotty at the end there.

John Poindexter - Conservative (1989-1993)
Reagan's former Exterior secretary, mastermind of the contras and later VP, who considered himself the real president toward the end of Reagan's term when his health waned.
Gary Condit - Liberal (1993-2001)
Moderate with exceptional charisma, nearly removed from office due to a sex scandal with a missing intern

Alan G. Poindexter - Conservative (2001-2009)
The son of the former president and a former astronaut. His administration oversaw terrorist attacks, botched overseas wars, and a complete financial collapse. Left office with most people wondering if the radiation from his spaceflight scrambled his head.
Barry Dunham - Labor/Liberal Fusion (2009-2017)
The first black president. Barack Dunham (he took his mother's surname) had been born in Hawaii, a California dependency, before moving to Oakland but that still didn't stop conspiracy theorists from speculating that he was a secret foreign agent. As senator from the East Bay province he was a member in good standing of the Liberal party, but a resurgence of left-wing and labor activism after the financial crash gave him an opening to broker a deal and become president on a fusion ticket. His attempts at economic reform after the crash were of mixed success and resulted in an anemic recovery, making him vulnerable to a reactionary and racist backlash.
Michael Savage - Nationalist/Conservative Fusion (2017-Present)
Perhaps the biggest shock of 2016, that fateful year, was the success of conservative radio host and conspiracy theorist Michael Savage. He founded the anti-immigrant Nationalist party over the air in 2012 and the next midterm conservatives lost seats to the upstart party. They agreed to a fusion ticket where Savage would be the standard bearer if congressional candidates would remain in the Conservative party. His administration has been an amusing (terrifying) interplay of Conservative apparatchiks keeping Savage stable enough to keep their business interests happy and Nationalist fringe figures pushing Savage to peculiar and dramatic places.
Im gonna attempt a USA, Dixie and Texas one, in-universe I bet people are finding ironic that presidents resemble somewhat in policies and stuff. To make things different gave Republic of Texas and Dixie the 6 years single term.

Texas (Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Texas, Wyoming):
John Nance Garner (Democratic) 1934-1946:
After the innefectiveness of President Charles Curtis, Garner managed to follow some aspects USA´s New Deal and California´s Pacific Deal policies, despite initially planning to run just one term, the fear of Earl Brower gaining track lead him to be the first and only Texan president to run two terms, defeating Republican candidate Alf Landon. He would lead the republic of Texas during WW2 with the aid of Supreme Texan general Eisenhower.

William H. Murray (Democratic) 1946-1952
A governor of Oklahoma whom attempted to run for president in 1933, despite not sucedding, he managed to gain the Vice Presidential nomination. He managed to ensure a single term limit became a thing on the republic.

D. Dwight Eisenhower (Republican) 1952-1958
The Supreme Commander of the Republic of Texas, known for being at odds with California and USA´s lead generals Patton and McArthur respectively. Due to his sucess, republicans asked him to become president.

Robert S. Kerr (Democratic) 1958-1963
While at the first chance he lost against Eisenhower, he managed to secure presidency in 1957 elections, being well known for his liberal policies, sadly he would die in 1963, one year before the end of his term.

Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic) 1963-1970
Johnson would oftenly be known as the president that ascended upon the former one´s death, while his administration was known as being infamous due to the vietnam war, he also ended up segregation, his term would also see Texas landing at the moon.

John Connally (Republican) 1970-1976
A somewhat moderate republican, he had managed to ease cold war tensions in both countries, though his support of Californian president Nixon would end up burying his party´s plans of suceeding in the 1975 elections.

Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic) 1976-1982
While somewhat unnamusing during his presidency years, he would later be known for calling out USA´s vicepresident when he tried to compare himself to John F. Kennedy, whom he had met when he was visiting USA.

Ross Perot (Republican) 1982-1988
While California Republic got an actor president, Texas was astounded at the fact that they had gotten a banker president, along with Reagan and Thatcher, they were known for their overly conservative policies.

Bob Dole (Republican) 1988-1994
Having been Perot´s VP and more politically experienced, people always considered him having been the real president on the previous administration.

Jim Wright (Democratic) 1994-2000
Former Speaker of the House, he ascended presidency and managed to oversee the end of the Cold War

Elizabeth Dole (Republican) 2000-2006
First woman president, upon the terrorist attacks on California, something similar would happen in the republic of Texas, starting what was known as the war on terror

Eddie Bernice Johnson (Democratic) 2006-2012
First afro-american president in the republic of Texas

Im not sure who should be the trump expy, Ted Cruz pheraps
 
Ok, now a more serious one:

USA PRESIDENTS:
1901-1909: Teddy Roosevelt (Republican)
1909-1913: William Howard Taft (Republican)
1913-1919: Teddy Roosevelt+ (Democratic)
1919-1921: Thomas R. Marshall (Democratic)
1921-1923: Warren G. Harding (Republican)
1923-1933: Calvin Coolidge (Republican)
1933-1945: Franklin Delano Roosevelt+/Wendell Wilkie (1933-1939),Henry A. Wallace(1941-1945) (Democratic)
1945-1949: Henry A. Wallace/Glenn H. Taylor (Democratic)
1949-1957: Thomas E. Dewey/Harold Stassen (Republican)
1957-1961: Harold Stassen/Henry Calbot Lodge Jr. (Republican)
1961-1969: John F. Kennedy/Humbert Humphrey (Democratic)
def 1960 - Harold Stassen/Henry Calbot Lodge Jr. (Republican)
def 1964 - Henry Calbot Lodge Jr/Nelson J. Rockefeller
(Republican)

1969-1977: Humbert Humphrey/Edmund Muskie (Democratic)
def 1968 - Nelson J. Rockefeller/Spiro Agnew (Republican)
def 1972 - John M. Ashbrook/John Volpe
(Republican)

1977-1981: Spiro Agnew/Elliot Richardson (Republican)
def 1976: George McGovern/Sergeant Shriver (Democratic)
1981-1989: Ted Kennedy/Walter Mondale (Democratic)
def 1980: Spiro Agnew/Elliot Richardson (Republican)
def 1984: John B. Anderson/Patrick Lucey (Republican)

1989-1993: Walter Mondale/Geraldine Ferraro (Democratic)
def 1988: Pete du Pont/Alexander Haig (Republican)
1993-2001: Hilary Rhodham/Jay Rockefeller (Republican)
def 1992: Walter Mondale/Geraldine Ferraro (Democratic)
def 1996: Tom Harkin/Harris Wofford (Democratic)

2001-2009: Donald Trump/Joe Lieberman (Republican)
def 2000: Geraldine Ferraro/Evan Bayh (Democratic)
def 2004: Howard Dean/Tom Vilsack (Democratic)

2009-2017: Joe Biden/Evan Bayhn (Democratic)
def 2008: Alan Keyes/Sarah Palin (Republican)
def 2012: Fred Karger/Paul Ryan (Republican)

2017-Present: Bernie Sanders/Amy Klobuchar (Democratic)
def 2016: Jill Stein/John Kasich (Republican)
def 2020: Michael Bloomberg/Bill Weld (Republican)


CONFEDERACY PRESIDENTS (States: South Carolina, Mississippi, Florida, Alabama, Georgia, Louisiana, Virginia, Arkansas, North Carolina, Franklin (East Tennessee), Tennessee, Sonora):
1898-1904: William Jennings Bryan (Liberal)
1904-1910: Champ Clark (Liberal)
1910-1916: Woodrow Wilson (Whig)
1916-1922: Oscar Underwood (Whig)
1922-1928: John W. Kerr (Liberal)
1928-1934: Joseph T. Robinson (Liberal)
1934-1940: Cordel Hull/Huey Long (Liberal)
def. 1933. Harry F Byrd (Whig)
1940-1946: Cordel Hull/Harry S. Truman (Liberal)
def 1939. George W. Norris (Whig)
1946-1952: Harry S. Truman/Alben W. Barkley (Liberal)
def 1945. Strom Thurmmond (Whig)
1952-1958: Strom Thurmmond/Fielding L. Wright(Whig)
def 1951. Adlai Louis Stevenson (Whig)
1958-1964: Adlai Louis Stevenson/Estes Kefauver(Until 1963) (Liberal)
def 1957: T. Coleman Andrews (Whig)
1964-1970: Barry Goldwater/George Wallace (Whig)
def 1963: Stuart Symington/Albert Gore Sr. (Liberal)
1970-1972: George Wallace/Gerald Ford (Whig) *Assasination attempt happens, Wallace resigns
def 1969: George Smathers/Terry Sanford (Liberal)
1972-1976: Gerald Ford/Howard Baker (Whig)*Finishes Wallace term
1976-1982: Jimmy Carter/Adlai Stevenson III (Liberal)
def 1975: Gerald Ford/Howard Baker (Whig)
1982-1988: Howard Baker/Anne Armstrong (Whig)
def 1981: Adlai Stevenson III/Dale Bumpers (Liberal)
1988-1994: Pat Robertson/John Rarick (Whig)
def. 1987: Jesse Jackson/Dick Gephardt (Liberal)
1994-2000: Bill Clinton/Al Gore (Liberal)
def. 1993: Pat Buchanan/Carrol Campbell (Whig)
2000-2006: Al Gore/John Edwards (Liberal)
def. 1999: John McCain/John Danforth (Whig)
2006-2012: John McCain/Mike Huckabee (Whig)
def. 2005: John Edwards/Wesley Clark (Liberal)
2012-2018: John Edwards/Jim Webb (Liberal)
def. 2011: Mike Huckabee/Bill Frist (Whig)
2018-Present: Marco Rubio/Newt Gingrich (Whig)
def. 2017: Jim Webb/Tim Kaine (Liberal)

TEXAS PRESIDENTS (States: Houston(West Texas Region), Lincoln (South Texas Region), Jefferson (Texas Panhandle), Texas (The Rest of Texas), Colorado, Kansas, Oklahoma, New Mexico, Wyoming, Chihuahua, Coahuila, Tamaulipas) :
1934-1946: John Nance Garner (Democratic)
1946-1952: William H. Murray (Democratic)
1952-1958: D. Dwight Eisenhower (Republican)
1958-1963: Robert S Kerr+/Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic) (Johnson finishes his term and wins another one on his own)
1963-1970: Lyndon B. Johnson/George Docking (Democratic)
def. 1963. Daniel Thorton (Republican)
1970-1976: George W. Romney/John Tower (Republican)
def 1965. George Docking (Democratic)
1976-1982: Lloyd Bentsen/John Conally (Democratic)
def. 1975: John Tower (Republican)
1982-1988: George H.W. Bush/Bob Dole (Republican)
def. 1981 John Conally (Democratic)
1988-1994: Bob Dole/Pete Domenici (Republican)
def. 1987 Gary Hart (Democratic)
1994-2000: Ross Perot/Pat Choate (Republican)
def. 1993 Pablo Emilio Madero (Democratic)
2000-2006: George W. Bush/Dick Cheney (Republican)
def. 1999 Gary Hart (Democratic)
2006-2012: John Kerry/Kathleen Sebelius (Democratic)
def. 2005 Ron Paul (Republican)
2012-2018: Mitt Romney/John Cornyn (Republican)
def 2011: Kathleen Sebelius/Chet Edwards (Democratic)
2018-Present: Ted Cruz/Jeb Bush (Republican)
def 2017: Julian Castro/John Hickenlooper (Democratic)

CALIFORNIA PRESIDENTS (California, Baja California, Baja California Sur, Calisota, Nevada, Utah, Hawaii):
1933-1945: Upton Sinclair (Democratic)
1945-1953: Earl Warren (Republican)
1953-1961: Pat Brown (Democratic)
1961-1969: Richard Nixon (Republican)
1969-1977: Ronald Reagan/Robert Finch (Republican)
1977-1985: Jerry Brown/Shirley Hufstedler (Democratic)
def. 1976 Robert Finch (Republican)
def. 1980 Jack Kemp (Republican)

1985-1993: Jack Kemp/Paul Laxalt (Republican)
def. 1984 Alan Cranston (Democratic)
def. 1988 Larry Agran (Democratic)

1993-2001: Larry Agran/Kathleen Brown (Democratic)
def. 1992 Paul Laxalt (Republican)
def. 1996 Pete Wilson (Republican)

2001-2009: Bob Dornan/Duncan L. Hunter (Republican)
def. 2000. Kathleen Brown (Democratic)
def. 2004. Nancy Pelosi (Democratic)

2009-2017: Barack Obama/Bill Richardson (Democratic)
def. 2008. Duncan L. Hunter/Carly Fiorina (Republican)
def. 2012. John Huntsman Jr./ Fred Karger (Republican)

2017-2021: Carly Fiorina/Brian Sandoval (Republican)
def. 2016 Bill Richardson/Xavier Becerra (Democratic)
2021-Present: Kamala Harris/Tulsi Gabbard (Democratic)
def. 2020 Carly Fiorina/Brian Sandoval (Republican)
 
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A "eh, let's throw Wallace in Timeline"

* =Died in office, **=assassinated

32: Franklin D Roosevelt*(March 4 1933-April 12 1945)/John Nance Garner(March 4 1933-January 20 1941), Henry A Wallace(January 20 1941-April 12 1945): Wallace narrowly keeps his vice presidency over Truman
33: Henry A Wallace(April 12 1945-January 20 1949): Unsurprisingly, Wallace isn't elected proper. He pursues a number of progressive policies, and works to add levity to the relationship with the Soviet Union. Though he refuses to sign off the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, nuclear testing still happens since he's not an idiot and knows the Soviet Union has figured it out. The Cold War becomes colder than IOTL. Japan gets divided by the Soviets
34: Robert A Taft*/Harold Stassen(January 20 1949-July 31 1953): Pursues a policy of both isolationism and realpolitik. The second time a father and son are both president. Wins re-election in keeping a difficult peace that starts to strain as his second term begins, however dies from his pancreatic cancer while in office
35: Harold Stassen(July 31 1953-January 20 1961)/Richard Nixon(January 20 1957-January 20 1961): Stassen was thrown into proving himself when the Colder War heated up. He picked Nixon's anti-communist views as VP
36: Curtis LeMay**(January 20 1961-November 5 1967)/Wayne Morse(January 20 1961-January 20 1965)/Hubert Humphrey(January 20 1965-November 5 1967): Semi-unintentionally on Taft and Stassen's part, the USA had been turning more conservative, so a more warhawky LeMay would notoriously defect and influence the Democrats in a more conservative fashion. A controversial president, respected for his toughness on the Soviet Union and increasing American power yet a bane on the civil rights movement. He ended up being assassinated by Charles Manson, who forms an anarchist hippie movement instead of a hippie cult.
37: Hubert Humphrey(November 5 1967-January 20 1977)/Ronald Reagan(January 12 1968-January 20 1973), George Smathers(January 20 1973-January 20 1977): Humphrey was put on LeMay's ticket in order to appeal to the more liberal factions. However as president he fixed many of the problems from LeMay, and both his VPs helped give him broad appeal.

Abridged(blue=Democrat, red=Republican)
32: Franklin D Roosevelt*(1933-1945)/John N Garner(1933-1941), Henry Wallace(1941-1945)
33: Henry Wallace(1945-1949)

34: Robert Taft*/Harold Stassen(1949-1953)
35: Harold Stassen(1953-1961)/Richard Nixon(1957-1961)

36: Curtis LeMay**(1961-1967)/Wayne Morse(1961-1965), Hubert Humphrey(1965-1967)
36: Hubert Humphrey(1967-1977)/Ronald Reagan(1967-1973), George Smathers(1973-1977)
 
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1981-1995:François Mitterrand
1995-2002:Lionel Jospin
2002-2016:Jacques Chirac
2016-2023:Jean-Pierre Chevenement
2023-2030:Jean Lassalle
 
33rd, 34th and 35th Presidents of the United States:
33.
Harry S. Truman (1945) †
34. Henry Morgenthau Jr. (1945-1948)
35. George S. Patton / Douglas MacArthur (1948-1952)

† - died in office
 
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