List of Alternate Presidents and PMs II

OO-OOOH MIII-CHHAAEELLL FOOO-OOOOT

1979-1984: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1979 (Majority) def. Jim Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1984 (Minority with UUP confidence and supply) def. Michael Foot (Labour), Roy Jenkins (Liberal-SDP Alliance), James Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist)

1984-1985: Ian Gilmour (Conservative minority with Liberal-SDP confidence and supply)
1985-1990: Michael Foot (Labour)
1985 (Majority) def. Ian Gilmour (Conservative), Enoch Powell (National Unionist), David Steel (Liberal), David Owen (Social Democratic)
"That's *Sir* Ian Gilmour to you, peasant..."

ETA: I like how Doctor O blew up the Alliance in a year's time, seems legit...
 
"That's *Sir* Ian Gilmour to you, peasant..."

ETA: I like how Doctor O blew up the Alliance in a year's time, seems legit...
I was imaging the Alliance splits over continuing to pursue a relationship with the Tories during the election, with some Liberals crossing over to become Soggies and vice versa, with the Liberals generally wanting to remain on the centre-left while the SDP turns rightwards. Of course, the Soggies plans are upskittled by the rise of the National Unionists.
 
I was imaging the Alliance splits over continuing to pursue a relationship with the Tories during the election, with some Liberals crossing over to become Soggies and vice versa, with the Liberals generally wanting to remain on the centre-left while the SDP turns rightwards. Of course, the Soggies plans are upskittled by the rise of the National Unionists.
Love it. I will also use "upskittled" in sentences now, feels like I've been waiting for the appearance of that verb in my life. And the sheer gleeful confusion between what it means to be any among (1) right-wing Liberals (2) wet National Unionists (and I imagine there would be a few) and (3) Owen-loyalist Soggies would cause even the Durham miners to microwave some popcorn and sit back for the festivities. As I observed to @Cevolian in his test thread, once again we may say:

"His name is Ozy-@Mumby-as,
King of Lists,
Look upon his works, ye mighty
And despair."

Only, like, really, with no decaying in the desert (or the Commons cloak room) whatsoever.

ETA: I would pay in my own kidneys to be a fly on the wall when they put Michael Foot and St. Ronnie of Pacific Pallisades in a room alone together. If Our Mick doesn't smother Reagan to death with his anorak and then give a thirty-seven-minute speech about how it was an act of mercy I will be deeply disappointed.
 
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InfernoMole - A Bonaparte as a President, or We Were Progressive and Stuff
A Bonaparte as a President, or We Were Progressive and Stuff:
1909-1917: Charles Joseph Bonaparte (Republican)
1908: (with L. M. Shaw as VP) def. William Jennings Bryan/John Kern (Democratic)
1912: (with Robert M. La Follette Sr. as VP) def. Eugene Foss/George E. Chamberlain (Democratic), Eugene V. Debs/Emil Seidel (Socialist)

1917-1921: Hiram Johnson/Calvin Coolidge (Republican)
1916: def. Champ Clark/Edwin T. Cummings (Democratic)
1921-1925: Giffard Pinchot/Leonard Wood (Republican)
1920: def. James M. Cox/Al Smith (Democratic)
1925-1933: James M. Cox (Democratic)
1924: (with Franklin D. Roosevelt as VP) def. Leonard Wood/Herbert Hoover (Republican)
1928: (with John J. Pershing as VP) def. Charles Curtis/James Wolcott Wadsworth Jr. (Republican)

1933-1941: Charles Lindbergh (Republican)
1932: (with Alf Landon as VP) def. John J. Pershing/Paul McNutt (Democratic)
1936: (with Arthur H. Vanderberg as VP) def. John Nance Garner/Cordell Hull (Democratic)

1941-1945: Henry Morgenthau Jr./John Nance Garner (Democratic)
1940: def. Arthur H. Vanderberg/Frank J. Loesch (Republican)
1945-1949: John Nance Garner/Fielding L. Wright (Democratic)
1944: def. Thomas E. Dewey/Wallace White (Republican), Phillip La Follette/Harold Stassen (Progressive)
1949-1957: Phillip La Follette (Republican)
1948: (with Earl Warren as VP) def. Fielding L. Wright/Russell B. Long (Democratic), Hubert Humphrey/Adlai Stevenson (Northern Democratic)
1952: (with Robert A. Taft as VP) def. Adlai Stevenson/Averell Harriman (Democratic)

1957-19XX: James Wetherington/Estes Kefauver (Democratic)
1956: def. Nelson Rockefeller/Richard Nixon (Republican)
 
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Mumby - Fascism Isn't In The British Character
'Fascism Isn't In The British Character'

1997-2007: Tony Blair (Labour)
1997 GE (Labour majority) def. John Major (Conservative), Paddy Ashdown (Liberal Democrat), David Trimble (UUP)
2001 PME 1st round def. William Hague (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat)
2001 PME 2nd round def. William Hague (Conservative)
2001 LE (Labour majority) def. William Hague (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat)
2005 PME 1st round def. Michael Howard (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Roger Knapman (UKIP)
2005 PME 2nd round def. Michael Howard (Conservative)
2005 LE (Labour majority) def. Michael Howard (Conservative), Charles Kennedy (Liberal Democrat), Ian Paisley (DUP)

2007-2009: Gordon Brown (Labour)
2009-2013: David Cameron (Conservative)
2009 PME 1st round def. Nick Griffin (BNP), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat), Gordon Brown (Labour)
2009 PME 2nd round def. Nick Griffin (BNP)
2009 LE (Conservative-Liberal Democrat Coalition) def. Nick Griffin (BNP), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat)
, Harriet Harman (Labour), Peter Robinson (DUP)
2013-2017: Jim Dowson (Patriotic Alliance)
2013 PME 1st round def. David Cameron (Conservative), Michael Meacher (Labour)
2013 PME 2nd round def. David Cameron (Conservative)
2013 LE (Patriotic Alliance majority) def. Michael Meacher (Labour), Theresa May (Conservative), Peter Robinson (DUP)
, Vince Cable (Liberal Democrat)

'The Patriotic Alliance government was blissfully shortlived as their fragile electoral coalition quickly crumbled under the pressure of government. The alliance of countryside traditionalists, working class discontents, a young generation of ultranationalist internet warriors, and of course the firm ideologues of fascism, proved unstable. The divisions were generally on the lines of biological vs cultural racism and piety vs atheism. The Alliance lost their majority in 2014, after the reconstituted New Tory Party was formed, and what ensued was the National Government of the mid 10s and early 20s. The Patriotic Alliance entirely collapsed in Opposition, with the New Tories remaining the only group to retain a significant presence in the Commons after the 2017 elections. Shards of the Alliance retain a presence in British politics however, even now well into the 2040s.'
 
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OO-OOOH MIII-CHHAAEELLL FOOO-OOOOT

1979-1984: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative)
1979 (Majority) def. Jim Callaghan (Labour), David Steel (Liberal)
1984 (Minority with UUP confidence and supply) def. Michael Foot (Labour), Roy Jenkins (Liberal-SDP Alliance), James Molyneaux (Ulster Unionist)

1984-1985: Ian Gilmour (Conservative minority with Liberal-SDP confidence and supply)
1985-1990: Michael Foot (Labour)
1985 (Majority) def. Ian Gilmour (Conservative), Enoch Powell (National Unionist), David Steel (Liberal), David Owen (Social Democratic)
So what exactly are the National Unionists?Is it similar to the UUUC?
 
So what exactly are the National Unionists?Is it similar to the UUUC?
I was imagining that Powell is able to draw over enough dries among the Tories, angered by Gilmour's coup, that the UUP branches out to be a right-wing opposition to a very wet Conservative Party.

I did start writing a bit more that went into the 90s, featuring Peter Shore as Prime Minister, and the Social Democrats and National Unionists merging to form the Democratic Unionist Party because hehehe
 
Mumby - For Want Of A Nigel
For Want Of A Nigel

2008-2010: Gordon Brown (Labour)
2010 (Coalition with Liberal Democrats) def. David Davis (Conservative), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist)
2010-2015: David Miliband (Labour-Liberal Democrat Coalition)
2015-2020: Boris Johnson (Conservative)
2015 (Majority) def. David Miliband (Labour), Nicola Sturgeon (Scottish Nationalist), Nick Clegg (Liberal Democrat), Peter Robinson (Democratic Unionist)
 
Nazi Space Spy - True North Revival
Here is something I sorta wrote up for a potential True North revival that I don't think is probably going to happen.

Credit to Canadian Tory and TB along with many others for the inspiration.

Prime Ministers of the Dominion of Canada
1861-1867: Abraham Lincoln (Liberal-Conservative) (1)

1861: Liberal-Conservative (Abraham Lincoln) def. Reform (George Brown), Anti-Confederation (Edward Everett)
1866: Liberal-Conservative (Abraham Lincoln) def. Reform (George Brown), Anti-Confederation (Joseph Howe)

1867-1875: John MacDonald (Liberal-Conservative) (2)
1871: Liberal-Conservative (Abraham Lincoln) def. Reform (Edward Blake), Provincial (Charles Francis Adams)
1875-1879: Alexander Mackenzie (Reform) (3)
1875: Reform (Alexander Mackenzie) def. Liberal-Conservative (John MacDonald)
1879-1891: John MacDonald (Liberal-Conservative) (4)*
1879: Liberal-Conservative (John MacDonald) def. Reform (Alexander Mackenzie)
1884: Liberal-Conservative (John MacDonald) def. Reform (Grover Cleveland)
1889: Liberal-Conservative (John MacDonald) def. Reform (Grover Cleveland)

1991-1895: William McKinley (Liberal-Conservative) (5)
1892: Liberal Conservative (William McKinley) def. Reform (Grover Cleveland), Populist (James Weaver)
1895-1899: Edward Blake (Reform) (6)
1895: Reform (Edward Blake) def. Liberal-Conservative (William McKinley), Populist (William J. Bryan)
1899-1906: Robert Todd Lincoln (Liberal-Conservative) (7)
1899: Liberal-Conservative (Robert Todd Lincoln) def. Reform (Wilfrid Laurier), Populist (William J. Bryan)
1904: Liberal-Conservative (Robert Todd Lincoln) def. Liberal (William J. Bryan), Progressive (Theodore Roosevelt Sr.)

1906-1914: Joseph Cannon (Liberal) (8)
1906: Liberal (Joseph Cannon) def. Progressive (Theodore Roosevelt Sr.), Unionist (Robert Todd Lincoln)
1910: Liberal (Joseph Cannon) def. Progressive Conservative (Theodore Roosevelt Sr.)

1914-1925: Theodore Roosevelt Sr. (Progressive Conservative) (9)*
1914: Progressive Conservative (Theodore Roosevelt Sr.) def. Liberal (Joseph Cannon)
1919: Progressive Conservative (Theodore Roosevelt Sr.) def. Liberal (Eugene Foss), Socialist (Eugene Debbs)
1924: Progressive Conservative (Theodore Roosevelt Sr.) def. Liberal (Henry Bourassa), Farmer-Laborer (Thomas Crerar), Socialist (Eugene Debbs)

1925-1931: William Thomas White (Progressive Conservative) (10)
1926: Progressive Conservative (William Thomas White) def. Liberal (Henry Bourassa), Social Democratic & Labour (Norman Thomas)
1930: Progressive Conservative (William Thomas White) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Norman Thomas), Liberal (Herbert Hoover)

1931-1933: Richard Bennett (Progressive Conservative) (11)
1933-1938: Norman Thomas (Social Democratic & Labour) (12)

1933: Social Democratic & Labour (Norman Thomas) def. Liberal (Alfred Landon), Progressive Conservative (Richard Bennett), Reconstruction (William Borah)
1938-1944: Theodore Roosevelt Jr. (Progressive Conservative) (13)*
1938: Progressive Conservative (Theodore Roosevelt Jr.) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Norman Thomas), Liberal (Alfred Landon)
1943: Progressive Conservative (Theodore Roosevelt Jr.) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Norman Thomas), Liberal (Joe Kennedy Sr.)

1944-1948: Louis St. Laurent (Progressive Conservative) (14)
1948-1955: Clarence Gillis (Social Democratic & Labour) (15)

1948: Social Democratic & Labour (Clarence Gillis) def. Progressive Conservative (Louis St. Laurent), Liberal (Joe Kennedy Sr.)
1953: Social Democratic & Labour (Clarence Gillis) def. Progressive Conservative (George Drew), Liberal (Joe Kennedy Sr.)

1955-1960: George Drew (Progressive Conservative) (16)
1955: Progressive Conservative (George Drew) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Clarence Gillis), Liberal (Maurice Duplessis)
1960-1968: Hubert Humphrey (Social Democratic & Labour) (17)
1960: Social Democratic & Labour (Hubert Humphrey) def. Progressive Conservative (George Drew), Liberal (John F. Kennedy)
1965: Social Democratic & Labour (Hubert Humphrey) def. Liberal (John F. Kennedy), Progressive Conservative (Harold Stassen)

1968-1973: Pierre Trudeau (Social Democratic & Labour) (18)
1969: Social Democratic & Labour (Pierre Trudeau) def. Progressive Conservative (Nelson Rockefeller), Liberal (Robert Kennedy)
1973-1976: Robert Stanfield (Progressive Conservative) (19)
1973: Progressive Conservative (Robert Stanfield) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Pierre Trudeau), Liberal (Paul Hellyer)
1976-1979: Pierre Trudeau (Social Democratic & Labour-Liberal coalition) (20)
1976: Social Democratic & Labour (Pierre Trudeau) def. Progressive Conservative (Robert Stanfield), Liberal (Paul Hellyer), Solidarity (George McGovern)
1979-1981: Flora Macdonald (Progressive Conservative) (21)
1979: Progressive Conservative (Flora Macdonald) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Pierre Trudeau), Liberal (Jean Chretien), Green (Ralph Nader), Solidarity (George McGovern)
1981-1985: Walter Mondale (Social Democratic & Labour) (22)
1981: Social Democratic & Labour (Walter Mondale) def. Progressive Conservative (Flora Macdonald), Liberal (Jean Chretien), Green (Ralph Nader)
1985-1993: George HW. Bush (Progressive Conservative) (23)
1985: Progressive Conservative (George HW. Bush) def. Liberal (Jean Chretien), Social Democratic & Labour (Walter Mondale), Green (Ralph Nader)
1989: Progressive Conservative (George HW. Bush) def. Liberal (Jean Chretien), Social Democratic & Labour (Edward Broadbent), Reform (Preston Manning), Green (Ralph Nader)

1993-1993: Kim Campbell (Progressive Conservative) (24)
1993-1996: Ed Broadbent (Social Democratic & Labour-Liberal-Green coalition) (25)

1993: Social Democratic & Labour (Edward Broadbent) def. Bloc Quebecois (Lucien Bouchard), Reform (Preston Manning), Liberal (Sheila Copps), Green (Ralph Nader), Progressive Conservative (Kim Campbell)
1996-2000: Patricia Carney (Reform-Progressive Conservative coalition) (26)
1996: Reform (Patricia Carney) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Edward Broadbent), Liberal (Sheila Copps), Bloc Quebecois (Lucien Bouchard), Progressive Conservative (Jean Charest), Green (Ralph Nader)
2000-2003: Paul Wellstone (Social Democratic & Labour) (27)*
2000: Social Democratic & Labour (Paul Wellstone) def. Reform (Patricia Carney), Liberal (Sheila Copps), Progressive Conservative (Jean Charest), Bloc Quebecois (Lucien Bouchard), Green (Ralph Nader)
2003-2005: Howard Dean (Social Democratic & Labour-Liberal coalition) (28)
2003: Social Democratic & Labour (Howard Dean) def. Reform (Stephen Harper), Liberal (John Kerry), Progressive Conservative (William Weld), Bloc Quebecois (Gilles Duceppe), Green (Jill Stein)
2005-2017: Stephen Harper (Reform-Progressive Conservative coalition) (29)
2005: Reform (Stephen Harper) def. Liberal (John Kerry), Social Democratic & Labour (Howard Dean), Progressive Conservative (William Weld), Bloc Quebecois (Gilles Duceppe), Green (Jill Stein)
2009: Reform (Stephen Harper) def. Liberal (Barack Obama), Social Democratic & Labour (Howard Dean), Progressive Conservative (Lincoln Chaffee), Bloc Quebecois (Gilles Duceppe), Green (Elizabeth May)
2013: Reform (Stephen Harper) def. Social Democratic & Labour (Bernie Sanders), Progressive Conservative (Susan Collins), Bloc Quebecois (Gilles Duceppe), Liberal (Hillary Rodham), Green (Elizabeth May)

2017-20XX: Paul Ryan (Reform) (30)

Parties as of 2017
Reform (Paul Ryan):
Economic liberalism, conservatism, social conservatism, "Blue Toryism".
Social Democratic & Labour (Bernie Sanders): Social Democracy, left-wing populism, trade unionism.
Progressive Conservative (Susan Collins): Progressive conservatism, centrism, Christian Democracy, "Red Toryism."
Liberal (Joseph Kennedy III): Centrism, progressivism, third way politics. Shifting slightly leftward under the new revitalized leadership.
Bloc Quebecois (Gilles Duceppe): Quebec nationalism, separatism, anti-federalism, left-wing populism, social democracy.
Green (Elizabeth May): Green politics, community politics, environentalism, eco-socialism, alter-globalization.
 
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Turquoise Blue - Shuffling The Decks: Opposition Edition
Shuffling The Decks: Opposition Edition

1963-1966: Sir Alec Douglas-Home (Conservative majority)

"The Peer"
Narrowly winning a fourth term for the Conservatives, Douglas-Home's time in office would be rather... unfortunate. Coming under attack for taking Britain into Vietnam, the economy started to look dicey and thus the Tories decided it was best to replace Douglas-Home with someone who could possibly lead the Tories to a fifth election.

1966-1971: Edward Heath (Conservative majority, then minority)
"The Captain"
George Brown seemed to be nailed-on to win 1968 for Labour. But as the campaign went on, his alcoholism was revealed and the Tories pressed on it, subtly implying that Brown couldn't be trusted to lead the nation. In the end, Brown resigned as leader on the campaign trail, throwing Labour in disarray. But it wouldn't keep the Tory majority, as ultimately the people were just plain tired of the Tories. Shambling with a minority for three years, Heath decided to call another election. Which he lost to Labour, throwing the Tories to the opposition for the first time in twenty years.

1971-1975: James Callaghan (Labour majority)
"The Leader"
In his four years, Callaghan marked himself out as someone who would unite the party and the country. Decidely a leader, he worked well with President Humphrey, but after he was succeeded by George McGovern in '73, the "special relationship" became frosty. But nobody would remember him for that, nor for his competent leadership. His assassination in 1975 overshadows everything else.

1975-1977: Harold Wilson (Labour majority)
"The Quiet One"
Always awkward on television, Wilson was seen as a frosty figure, and the contrast between him and the personable Callaghan only made that worse. And in the 1977 election, with union strikes being a major issue he ended up losing Labour's only majority in twenty years and stepped down, replaced by someone who could lead them back to victory.

1977-1981: Edward Heath (Conservative majority)
"The Captain Returns"
Heath, after six years at Opposition, was determined to lead the Tories into a new era of dominance. But in the end, it was Europe that undermined him. Taking Britain into the EC created new divisions in both the Tories and Labour and in the end the 1981 election showed that the Tories were more divided than Labour was. Hence Labour won their second majority in only thirty years.

1981-1986: Michael Foot (Labour majority)
"The Intellectual"
Decidely an Eurosceptic, he ended up withdrawing Britain from the EC after a referendum narrowly went Leave. Very much seen as on the "soft-left" in contrast with Tony Benn's "hard-left", after a series of party-dividing policies such as full-on fighting the Falklands War [which is commonly accepted as why Labour won a landslide in 1985], he ended up being pushed out in favour of a two-term MP.

1986-1989: Jeremy Corbyn (Labour majority)
"The Radical"
A Bennite and decidely on the hard-left of Labour, he was commonly seen as an inexperienced leader and a puppet of Tony Benn. His bringing Gerry Adams into Parliament and talking openly of "Irish unification" and rumours that he was working with the Soviets forced the deep state to put on its glove and push him out. This would later be characterised as a fictional novel - "A Very British Coup".

1989-1990: John Smith (Labour majority, then minority)
"The Brief One"
Between Corbyn and Thatcher, nobody remembers John Smith. Handed a very, very unpopular party, the man did all he could, but couldn't salvage the party to save it at the 1990 election, not when a lot defected to form the Social Democrats - "a new party, clean of Communism" declared Tony Blair. Labour ended up wiped out as Britain voted against what they saw as a Moscow-controlled party.

1990-1993: Margaret Thatcher (Conservative majority)
"The Bronze Lady"
Thatcher would be remembered as someone who was handed an opportunity to radically transform British politics, and screwed it all up. Starting her ministry in high hopes, the issue of Europe rose its head again as the SDP was decidely pro-Europe. In the end, a referendum was held, one that divided the Tory Party and (temporarily) united the SDP behind Blair. She resigned after losing the referendum as Britain voted to "stay out".

1993-1995: Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative majority)
"The Social Justice Warrior"
Publically dubbing himself a "Social Justice Warrior" at the Tory conference in 1993, IDS shifted the party into a more socially conservative direction. Publicly backing President Bush's aggressively anti-Soviet foreign policy [abandoning the detente of President Mondale], he pushed for policies that would make it harder for people to divorce, implementing the controversial "Section 29" that made it illegal for councils to "support or encourage homosexuality" and got Britain into the Pakistani War. All this got him acclaims from his party's base, but alienated him from 'moderates'.

1995-1997: Tony Blair (Social Democratic-Labour coalition)
"The Flower Power Kid"
Blair's victory in 1995 was far smaller than expected, and he had to enter in a coalition with the much-smaller and still-unpopular Labour Party under Dennis Skinner. Seen as following a very "New Left" kind of ideology, he pushed for the complete reversal of IDS' social policies and going further with liberalising Britain, and the withdrawal of Britain from Pakistan, which made the deep state uneasy and they considered shifting him in favour of Gordon Brown, before the second assassination of a British PM in the 20th century happened. After his death, he became a martyr similar to Callaghan. Even now in the aftermath of the Final War, the Left still adores him as "the people's Prime Minister" and the label "Blairite" is still worn with pride twenty years after his untimely death.

1997-2003: Neil Kinnock (Social Democratic-Labour coalition, then Social Democratic majority)
"The Uniter"
After the brief premiership of Dennis Skinner, Kinnock took over. As a former Labour MP who only defected after the 1990 election [which he held Islwyn by the skin of his teeth], he pushed for the rump Labour Party to be merged into the bigger SDP "to unite the left", He committed Britain to "non-interventionist" ways of aiding President Clinton's Pakistan War, a clear shift from Blair's outright pacifism. With the Tories still hurt by IDS' legacy, Kinnock easily defeated Portillo in 1999. In 2001, there was a refugee crisis which created tensions about immigration, which led to him losing 2003.

2003-2007: Michael Howard (Conservative majority)
"The Disaster"
It is commonly accepted that the "West"'s part of the blame for the Final War goes all the way back to Prime Minister Howard and President Bush and their belligerent policies against the Soviet Union contributed to turning tension up to an unsustainable level in which it could only blow. Howard's policies were more or less a reheat of IDS' own policies with more of a focus on immigration [which after all, was why he won 2003]. As the Cold War "became a Hot War" according to Time, he led Britain into invasions of Egypt and Thailand following President Clinton's own "hawkish" aims to "finish off Soviet influence for once and all". This got him much criticism from the new Opposition Leader Ted Miliband who led the SDP to a bare lead over the Tories. Seeing the writing on the wall, Howard resigned in 2007.

2007-2008: William Hague (Conservative majority)
"The Disuniter"
Hague's time in office was more or less "driving the ship into the iceberg". With Britain becoming somewhat tired of all those wars, thank you, the Tories stagnated in the polls as Miliband led the SDP to a big lead. But as the campaign went on, Hague successfully said that if people vote for Labour, they'll get the Green Liberals as their coalition partner. This was successful because the Green Liberals was not a popular party, they were seen as a party of kooks and immature students. But like IDS, he couldn't save the Tories from the backlash.

2008-2013: Ted Miliband (Social Democratic-Green Liberal coalition)
"The Uneasy Feeling"
Ironically, Hague's fearmongering of a SDP-GLA coalition only made it more likely as the Tories were too back down to actually win a majority. As Miliband stood next to David Icke in the Rose Garden and tried his best to smile and bear it, his government was already living on borrowed time. As John McCain was replaced by former President Hillary Clinton in 2009, it was clear that America fully intended on fighting the heating Cold War. And that his SDP was willing to follow America into it. Originally elected as a "new Blair", he nevertheless backed military intervention in Egypt and Thailand [however he described his support as "ending human rights violating dictatorships"], he claimed to oppose further wars ["Read my lips: no more wars"], but after a hard-left terrorist organization based in Ghana successfully hit the Louvre in France, he backed an intervention in Ghana which lost him supporters. Icke and the Green Liberals threatened to withdraw from the coalition ten times over his support of the "Hot War", but they ended up bottling every time.

2013-2017: John Major (Conservative majority, then Conservative-Social Democratic-Green Liberal "Ministry of All the Talents")
"The New Tory, the Same Old Story" [credit to @Thande for coining the term]
Unlike previous leaders of the Conservative Party, Major claimed he was "a new leader for a new era", publicly breaking with the party's old social conservative stances. Winning a majority over the unstable Miliband-Icke coalition [which only ended up undermining both parties], he ended up proving that he was more of the same belligerent Tory policies on foreign policy. Working with President Kerry, he amplified up military interventions, even as more Tories and SDP started saying "erm, hold on, we should go back to detente, that sounds safe". And then in January 2016, the balloon went up.

As President Kerry and General-Secretary Zyuganov were killed in the resulting exchange, Major was in the country and was left unscathed. Once he was made aware of the Final War, he declared a state of emergency, he reached out to the SDP and Green Liberals to form a "national unity government, a ministry of all the talents if you will". With Owen Smith and Norman Lamb agreeing to the coalition, he began "Britain's time of recovery". Overnight, he became an austere leader and incredibly withdrawn. His Cabinet became critical of this approach, which he defended as "no need to talk politics, we have more important stuff to think about". And while he did all of this, his popularity with the British people went down to a record low in polling history...

2017-: David Cameron (Conservative-Social Democratic-Green Liberal "Ministry of All the Talents")
"The Survivor"
In June 2017, it proved too much. Britain clearly did not want, in its period of recovery from a nuclear war, a premier who was both blamed for the war itself and then withdrew from the public. They wanted a new leader, one who they could genuinely trust. And thus the Conservative Party knifed Major and elected a new leader, the nuclear-blemished David Cameron who was lucky enough to escape the full blast, but not lucky enough to escape unscathed. Presenting himself as a defiant figure and his scarred complexion as a sign of authenicity and transparency, a clear contrast to previous "polished" PMs, he gained the people's trust. Under him, the rebuilding of Britain from the horrors of the Final War truly began. After all, as the new Prime Minister said in his first speech, "things can only get better". Right?
 
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shiftygiant

Gone Fishin'
1993-1995: Iain Duncan Smith (Conservative majority)
"The Social Justice Warrior"
Publically dubbing himself a "Social Justice Warrior" at the Tory convention in 1993, IDS shifted the party into a more socially conservative direction. Publicly backing President Bush's aggressively anti-Soviet foreign policy [abandoning the detente of President Mondale], he pushed for policies that would make it harder for people to divorce, implementing the controversial "Section 29" that made it illegal for councils to "support or encourage homosexuality" and got Britain into the Pakistani War. All this got him acclaims from his party's base, but alienated him from 'moderates'.
[A NOISLESS SCREAM RIVETS FROM PORTSMOUTH]
 
Turquoise Blue - Shuffling The Decks: Opposition Edition (U.S. List)
And here's a quick America list to go with it.

1961-1965: Richard Nixon (Republican)
1965-1973: Hubert Humphrey (Democratic)
1973-1980: George McGovern (Democratic) - killed by a car bomb that drove straight at a campaign rally of his -

1980: Jimmy Carter (Democratic) - barely escaped the bomb with his life, lived a week in agony before finally dying -
1980-1981: Gerald Ford (Republican) - as Speaker of the House of Representatives, he ascended to office upon Carter's death -
1981-1985: Barry Goldwater (Republican)
1985-1986: Bob Dole (Republican) - As elected Vice-President by the Senate, he became Acting President while the Presidency was vacant -
1986-1989: Michael Dukakis (Democratic) - Declined to run for a second term due to ill-health -
1989-1993: Walter Mondale (Democratic)
1993-1997: George H. W. Bush (Republican)
1997-2001: Hillary Clinton (Democratic)
2001: Mitt Romney (Republican) - died in an analogue to 9/11 -
2001-2009: John McCain (Republican)
2009-2013: Hillary Clinton (Democratic)
2013-2016: John Kerry (Democratic)
- Died in the nuclear exchange that became known as the "Final War" -
2016-: Al Gore (Democratic)
 
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theev - Shuffling the Deck with Upside Down Cards
Shuffling the Deck with Upside Down Cards


1945-1945: Franklin D. Roosevelt/Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic)
1944: Thomas Dewey/John W. Bricker (Republican)
1945-1949: Lyndon B. Johnson/Vacant (Democratic) [1]
1949-1952: Dwight D. Eisenhower/Alben W. Barkley (Democratic) [2]

1948: Harold Stassen/Arthur Vandenberg (Republican) , Strom Thurmond/Fielding L. Wright (States' Rights) , Henry A. Wallace/Glen H. Taylor (Progressive)
1952-1953: Dwight D. Eisenhower/Vacant (Democratic)
1953-1956: Dwight D. Eisenhower/Harry Truman (Democratic)

1952: Robert A. Taft/Charles A. Halleck (Republican) , Harry F. Byrd/Richard Russell Jr. (States' Rights)
1956-1957: Harry Truman/Vacant (Democratic) [3]
1957-1965:
Richard Nixon/Walter Judd (Republican) [4]

1956: Harry Truman/Estes Kefauver (Democratic) , Harry F. Byrd/J. William Fulbright (States' Rights)
1960: Adlai Stevenson/John F. Kennedy (Democratic) , Strom Thurmond/James O. Eastland (States' Rights)

1965-1969: Richard Nixon/Margaret Chase Smith (Republican)
1964: Hubert Humphrey/George Wallace (Democratic) , Barry Goldwater/Herman Talmadge (States' Rights)
1969-1973: Gerald Ford/James A. Rhodes (Republican) [5]
1968: John Wayne/John Tower (States' Rights) , Richard Nixon/Margaret Chase Smith (Independent) , Edmund Muskie/Robert F. Kennedy (Democratic)
1973-1979: Ronald Reagan/John F. Kennedy (Democratic) [6]
1972: Richard Nixon/Ed Brooke (National Union) , John G. Schmitz/Lester Maddox (States' Rights) , Gerald Ford/James A. Rhodes (Republican)
1976: Robert Dole/George H. W. Bush (Republican) , Richard Nixon/Elliot Richardson (National Union) , John Rarick/Jesse Helms (States' Rights)

1979-1979: John F. Kennedy/Vacant (Democratic) [7]
1979-1981:
John F. Kennedy/Terry Sanford (Democratic)
1981-1989: George H. W. Bush/James B. Edwards (Republican) [8]

1980: Terry Sanford/Edward M. Kennedy (Democratic) , Richard Nixon/John B. Anderson (National Union) , Jesse Helms/Evan Mecham (States' Rights)
1984: Alan Cranston/Adlai Stevenson III (Democratic) , Richard Nixon/Ed Brooke (National Union) , Jesse Helms/Larry McDonald (States' Rights)

1989-1993: William J. Clinton/Jack Kemp (Republican) [9]
1988: Walter Mondale/John C. West (Democratic) , Ron Paul/Dick Mountjoy (States' Rights) , John B. Anderson/Ed Zschau (National Union)
1993-2001: James E. Carter/Joseph Biden (Democratic) [10]
1992: William J. Clinton/Jack Kemp (Republican) , Ron Paul/Bob Barr (States' Rights)
1996: Dan Quayle/Richard B. Cheney (Republican) , Ron Paul/Various (States' Rights)

2001-2009: George W. Bush/John Ashcroft (Republican) [11]
2000: Joseph Biden/Skip Humphrey (Democratic)
2004: Al Gore/Howard Dean (Democratic)

2009-2013: Donald Trump/Sam Brownback (Republican) [12]
2008: Bill Richardson/Russ Feingold (Democratic)
2013-0000: Barack Obama/Kathleen Sebelius (Democratic) [13]
2012: Donald Trump/Sam Brownback (Republican)
2016: Chris Christie/Ben Carson (Republican)



[1] A young man in over his head

[2] A military man's administration plagued by war and instability

[3] A political insider finally given his chance to shine

[4]
A modern day Founding Father revered for his commitment to serving the people

[5] An ardent opponent of his predecessor who made the worst of a good situation

[6] A stiff politician hardened by years of experience

[7] A tired old man who couldn't wait to leave

[8] A charismatic man who saved his party's electoral chances

[9] An inexperienced man who quickly found himself unpopular

[10] An experienced statesman who came in to save the day

[11] A man universally known for his popularity and political success

[12]
A boring suit with decades of political experience and a seemingly inevitable victory

[13] A basic and average politician with few distinguishable qualities
 
Sorry for bumping this thread when I am not posting a list, but I do have a question: What is your opinion of The first list of the first thread, by Razors are for Fish?
 

shiftygiant

Gone Fishin'
Sorry for bumping this thread when I am not posting a list, but I do have a question: What is your opinion of The first list of the first thread, by Razors are for Fish?
It's a list.

And Trimble is always nice to see as an alternate PM.

Scargil is a bit hackney and it's all convergent, but it was 2010, so whatever.
 
Gorrister - Prime Ministers of the Northern Irish State
Prime Ministers of the Northern Irish State

"if and when the politicians fail us it may be our job to liquidate the enemy"
- William Craig.

1974-1984: William Craig (Vanguard Progressive Unionist)
1974 (Majority) def. unopposed
1978 (Coalition with Free Ulster and New Front) def. Peter Robinson (Free Ulster), Gerry Fitt (Democratic and Labour), Ernest Baird and John Dunlop (New Front), Oliver Napier (Independent Unity)
1982 (Coalition with Free Ulster and New Front) def. Gerry Fitt (DLP), Tommy Herron (New Front), Peter Robinson (Free Ulster), Robert Bradford (National Front), David Trimble (Unity)

1984-1985: William Craig (Victory for Ulster majority)
1985-1988: Peter Robinson (Victory for Ulster)
1985 (Majority) def. Gerry Fitt (DLP), Robert Bradford (National Front), Roy Bradford (Unity)
1988-1989: Samuel Wilson (Victory for Ulster majority)
1989-1999: Nelson McCausland (Victory for Ulster)
1989 (Majority) def. Paddy Devlin (DLP), Eileen Paisley (Unity)
1992 (suspension of democratic elections)


Harold Wilson's handling of the 1974 Ulster UDI is considered one of his greatest mistakes. Craig's ascension should have been foretold, with Paisley's "wobble" in 1972 and subsequent assassination by a rogue loyalist paramilitary leading to a gap in unionism that Boal left to Vanguard. The DUP were left in the dust as the main opposition to Faulkner and the government became Craig, often compared to Hitler and his rallies to those at Nuremberg during the 1930's. Comparisons that were somewhat trumped up but perhaps warranted by those with a genuine fear of the man and what he stood for. The 1973 Assembly Elections were held with the tactit support of the UUP and other prospective Executive parties. Events, including the IRA assassination of John Taylor and an attempted party coup upon Faulkner, would make the case for Vanguard among the electorate. And so it was that Faulkner and pro-powersharing members were hopelessly outnumbered by the forces of Vanguard, anti-powersharing Ulster Unionists, and the vastly weakened DUP, who would fold in with time. Craig took power immediately in a coalition with other unionist splitters and rapidly rammed through legislation to tighten his grip. Yet, power to dissolve the assembly rested with Westminster. Craig acknowledged that his time would soon be up and conspired to set up an independent Northern Irish state after an assumed ouster. It was an idea that Wilson was also fond of, funnily enough, and with his government already dependant on the Liberals, he had even less time for Northern Ireland. So when Secretary Stanley Orme ordered the suspension of Stormont after the failure of Craig to meet a deadline for talks on reforms, the embattled first minister knew he had to act. With the little he had, he met with paramilitary forces to ensure their united support and ensured backing from figures within the RUC. And so when Orme went to declare the fall of Stormont (the second time), he was overshadowed by Craig's own announcement.

Craig was beset on all sides, and as soon as he uttered the famous words in Lisburn that Ulster Stood Alone, he knew he had little to look forward to in terms of forming a new state from scratch. Ramshackle elections were held with no opposition to the Vanguard regime. Jenkins took over from Wilson and sent SAS to Belfast, where a combination of RUC resistance and poor co-ordination doomed the operation. The Republic was another matter, but a deep split in Fianna Fáil meant a healthy majority for the National Coalition which wasn't quite so interested in involving itself. The new state quickly received support from the lovely regimes in Rhodesia and South Africa, while later President Reagan would keep a blind eye on the matter as he forced the British government to declare defeat in the Falklands war. At home, Craig sought to enforce the rule of law and did so with an iron grip. The 1978 elections saw Craig enter coalition with the 'controlled opposition' of unionist parties, with Gerry Fitt's DLP doing poorly in an intimidating atmosphere for nationalist voters. Britain, in a shambles following a brief Joseph premiership attempting hardline monetarism, could do little but watch on. The UN convened on the matter after a massacre in the Falls, but a veto from the US stopped outright intervention. The Soviets were funding counter-governmental activities in Ulster, providing a propaganda boon to Craig when the news was released. He won in 1982 along the backdrop of a worldwide depression. 1984 ended the joke of unionist opposition as Craig and Robinson initiated the merger of state-supporting forces into the Victory for Ulster party. Craig would die soon after its founding and was replaced by the hardline Robinson, who promised a doubled down focus on tackling terror and improving employment. New jobs in the shipbuilding sector were promised but didn't come and it was only on defence contracts with the Haig administration where economic growth was found. Scottish Independence in 1986 put the kibosh on any prospect of Britain restoring Ulster into the union. Robinson's harshening of internment camps, even going as far as to hire mercenaries to protect the facilities, would attract criticism and led to Eileen Paisley's entry into politics on behalf of the moderate Unity party. Robinson was eventually forced out of the leadership by a cabal of MPs, lead by the power hungry Nelson McCausland. McCausland imposed the untested Samuel Wilson into the position of PM. He would soon be undone and was found by the roadside in a state of intoxication - it is unknown where the alcohol came from and has been alleged to be planted by McCausland, who would take his place with an iron fist, turning Northern Ireland into a police state in his own image, with him serving as Big Brother.
 
Last edited:
Prime Ministers of the Northern Irish State

"if and when the politicians fail us it may be our job to liquidate the enemy"
- William Craig.

1974-1984: William Craig (Vanguard Progressive Unionist)
1974 (Majority) def. unopposed
1978 (Coalition with Free Ulster and New Front) def. Peter Robinson (Free Ulster), Gerry Fitt (Democratic and Labour), Ernest Baird and John Dunlop (New Front), Oliver Napier (Independent Unity)
1982 (Coalition with Free Ulster and New Front) def. Gerry Fitt (DLP), Tommy Herron (New Front), Peter Robinson (Free Ulster), Robert Bradford (National Front), David Trimble (Unity)

1984-1985: William Craig (Victory for Ulster majority)
1985-1988: Peter Robinson (Victory for Ulster)
1985 (Majority) def. Gerry Fitt (DLP), Robert Bradford (National Front), Roy Bradford (Unity)
1988-1989: Samuel Wilson (Victory for Ulster majority)
1989-1999: Nelson McCausland (Victory for Ulster)
1989 (Majority) def. Paddy Devlin (DLP), Eileen Paisley (Unity)
1992 (suspension of democratic elections)


Harold Wilson's handling of the 1974 Ulster UDI is considered one of his greatest mistakes. Craig's ascension should have been foretold, with Paisley's "wobble" in 1972 and subsequent assassination by a rogue loyalist paramilitary leading to a gap in unionism that Boal left to Vanguard. The DUP were left in the dust as the main opposition to Faulkner and the government became Craig, often compared to Hitler and his rallies to those at Nuremberg during the 1930's. Comparisons that were somewhat trumped up but perhaps warranted by those with a genuine fear of the man and what he stood for. The 1973 Assembly Elections were held with the tactit support of the UUP and other prospective Executive parties. Events, including the IRA assassination of John Taylor and an attempted party coup upon Faulkner, would make the case for Vanguard among the electorate. And so it was that Faulkner and pro-powersharing members were hopelessly outnumbered by the forces of Vanguard, anti-powersharing Ulster Unionists, and the vastly weakened DUP, who would fold in with time. Craig took power immediately in a coalition with other unionist splitters and rapidly rammed through legislation to tighten his grip. Yet, power to dissolve the assembly rested with Westminster. Craig acknowledged that his time would soon be up and conspired to set up an independent Northern Irish state after an assumed ouster. It was an idea that Wilson was also fond of, funnily enough, and with his government already dependant on the Liberals, he had even less time for Northern Ireland. So when Secretary Stanley Orme ordered the suspension of Stormont after the failure of Craig to meet a deadline for talks on reforms, the embattled first minister knew he had to act. With the little he had, he met with paramilitary forces to ensure their united support and ensured backing from figures within the RUC. And so when Orme went to declare the fall of Stormont (the second time), he was overshadowed by Craig's own announcement.

Craig was beset on all sides, and as soon as he uttered the famous words in Lisburn that Ulster Stood Alone, he knew he had little to look forward to in terms of forming a new state from scratch. Ramshackle elections were held with no opposition to the Vanguard regime. Jenkins took over from Wilson and sent SAS to Belfast, where a combination of RUC resistance and poor co-ordination doomed the operation. The Republic was another matter, but a deep split in Fianna Fáil meant a healthy majority for the National Coalition which wasn't quite so interested in involving itself. The new state quickly received support from the lovely regimes in Rhodesia and South Africa, while later President Reagen would keep a blind eye on the matter as he forced the British government to declare defeat in the Falklands war. At home, Craig sought to enforce the rule of law and did so with an iron grip. The 1978 elections saw Craig enter coalition with the 'controlled opposition' of unionist parties, with Gerry Fitt's DLP doing poorly in an intimidating atmosphere for nationalist voters. Britain, in a shambles following a brief Joseph premiership attempting hardline monetarism, could do little but watch on. The UN convened on the matter after a massacre in the Falls, but a veto from the US stopped outright intervention. The Soviets were funding counter-governmental activities in Ulster, providing a propaganda boon to Craig when the news was released. He won in 1982 along the backdrop of a worldwide depression. 1984 ended the joke of unionist opposition as Craig and Robinson initiated the merger of state-supporting forces into the Victory for Ulster party. Craig would die soon after its founding and was replaced by the hardline Robinson, who promised a doubled down focus on tackling terror and improving employment. New jobs in the shipbuilding sector were promised but didn't come and it was only on defence contracts with the Haig administration where economic growth was found. Scottish Independence in 1986 put the kibosh on any prospect of Britain restoring Ulster into the union. Robinson's harshening of internment camps, even going as far as to hire mercenaries to protect the facilities, would attract criticism and led to Eileen Paisley's entry into politics on behalf of the moderate Unity party. Robinson was eventually forced out of the leadership by a cabal of MPs, lead by the power hungry Nelson McCausland. McCausland imposed the untested Samuel Wilson into the position of PM. He would soon be undone and was found by the roadside in a state of intoxication - it is unknown where the alcohol came from and has been alleged to be planted by McCausland, who would take his place with an iron fist, turning Northern Ireland into a police state in his own image, with him serving as Big Brother.
Sunningdale for fascist long-con-ers rather than slow learners, then?
 
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