List of Alternate Presidents and PMs II

POD:
Dutch Schultz kills Dewey in 1935, as a result the Italo-American Mafia in New York is never brought down and through its connections to Tammany Hall it's able to influence the Democratic Party, who becomes divided along the following lines: a Southern Blue Dogs faction, a Midwestern leftist faction, and a centrist Northeastern faction centered around Tammany Hall who acts as kingmakers.
Meanwhile the GOP never pursues the Southern Strategy, and remains divided between a Taft-style conservative faction, and a moderate Roosevelt-style faction.

33. Harry Truman (D-MO) / Alben Barkley (D-KY) 1945 - 1949

34. Harold Stassen (R-MN) / Leverett Saltonstall (R-MA) 1949 - 1953

35. Harry Truman (D-MO) / Adlai Stevenson (D-Illinois) 1953 - 1961

36. Nelson Rockfeller (R-NY) / Thruston Morton (R-KY) 1961 - 1965

37. Hubert Humphrey (D-MN) / Terry Sanford (D-SC) 1965 - 1969

38. Thruston Morton (R-KY) / George Romney (R-MI) 1969 - 1977

39. Mo Udall (D-AZ) / Bobby Kennedy (D-MA) 1977 - 1985

40. Bobby Kennedy (D-MA) / Al Gore (D-TN) 1985 - 1987

41. Al Gore (D-TN) / Michael Dukakis (D-MA) 1987 - 1993

42. Jack Kemp (R-NY) / Lamar Alexander (R-TN) 1993 - 2001

43. Lamar Alexander (R-TN) / John Kasich (R-OH) 2001 - 2009

44. John Kerry (D-MA) / Dick Gephardt (D-MO) 2009 - 2017

45. Mike Bloomberg (R-NY) / Joe Biden (R-DE) 2017 - 2021

46. Barack Obama (D-IL) / Joe Patrick Kennedy III (D-MA) 2021
 
List of Lord-Governors of East Florida (Florida Oriental)
As a governate, East Florida elects its executive-for-life after the death of whoever holds the lordship.

  1. Juan I (Palacios y Valenzuela) | RP: Independent | CA: Realmists | T: 1802-1811 (9) | L: 1749-1826 (62) [1]
  2. Juan José (de Estrada) | RP: Floridian Party | CA: Realmists | T: 1812-1833 (21) | L: 1766-1833 (67) [2]
  3. Juan II (Jacobs) | RP: Unionist Party | CA: Centralists | T: 1833-1835 (2) | L: 1781-1835 (53) [3]
  4. Pedro I (Palacios y Valenzuela) | RP: Floridian Party | CA: Realmists/later also Royalist | T: 1836-1867 (31) | L: 1801-1867 (66) [4]
  5. Juan III (Quesada) | RP: Agrarian Peoples Party | CA: Realmists/later Agrarian Confederal Coalition | T: 1867-1892 (25) | L: 1825-1892 (67) [5]
  6. Pedro II (Santana) | RP: Agrarian Peoples Part/later Farmer-Labor Party | CA: United Workers Front | T: 1893-1939 (46) | L: 1858-1939 (80) [6]
  7. Felipe (González) | RP: Holy Democratic Party | CA: Pan-Realm Confederalist Movement | T: 1939-1952 (12) | L: 1879-1952 (73) [7]
  8. José Luis (Santana) | RP: Farmer-Labor Party | CA: United Workers Front | T: 1952-1967 (15) | L: 1885-1967 (81)
  9. Augusto (Orellana) | RP: Farmer-Labor Party | CA: United Workers Front | T: 1967-1988 (11) | L: 1927-1988 (61)
  10. Ricardo (Tapanes) | RP: Farmer-Labor Party | CA: United Workers Front | T: 1988-2014 (26) | L: 1930-2014 (84) [8]
  11. Juan Carlos (Alvarado)| RP: Liberal-Centralist Party| CA: Liberal Alliance for Prosperity | T: Incumbent (6) | L: 1967 (53) [9]
[1] Juan I oversaw the Spanish Rebellion (1774) against British rule over East Florida and then merged his movement into the greater American Revolution with promises of autonomy and a distaste for rejoining Spain [East Florida hadn't been under Spain's control since the Treaty of Valencia in 1702, despite maintaining a large Spanish population under French rule (1702-1754)]. Juan led the way during the negotiating period with the confederal government and was emphatically selected as the first Lord-Governor when East Florida was admitted into the confederation in 1802. He died midway during the War of Georgian Aggression (known as the Expansion War in Georgia), but his efforts ensured a successful outcome for the realm.

[2] Juan José gained power in the latter half of the War of Georgian Aggression amidst a wave of realmist support in East Florida. This dispute that crafted his party and his campaign was over less than a year later, however, and Juan José would go on to rule largely peacefully until the Greater Native War (known confederation wide as the Floridian First Peoples War) which would ultimately end with the establishment of the Mayaimi Confederacy and the near-forcible removal of natives in East Florida south. In modern times, Juan José has come under considerable scrutiny for his treatment of First Peoples in East Florida, with many dubbing the Greater Native War as a form of coeticide.

[3] Juan II is the only purely non-Spanish lord-governor in East Florida's history, having been elected after the controversial 1833 election. His reign was tumultuous, and despite historians believing his victory was legitimate, public support for Juan II diminished rapidly. The Floridian Revolt of 1834-35 resulted in Juan II being captured and hung on claims of aiming to have the Spanish population (vast majority) forcibly removed. Juan II is the only East Floridian lord-governor to be assassinated and his death caused considerable outcry across the Union of American Realms and soured the view of East Florida amongst many other members of the confederation. Juan II holds the record for shortest tenure lord-governor.

[4] The first person elected to the office to have been related to a prior lord-governor. Pedro I's election was nearly as controversial as Juan II's, however the realm largely coalesced under his rule. Despite being ardently on the realmist side of Executive Council members and being a member of East Florida's realmist Floridian Party, Pedro I spent the vast majority of his tenure rebuilding relations with the rest of the confederation. In the early years, this meant being royalist, which allowed East Florida to make a number of friends. When the anti-royalist movement peaked in the mid 19th century due to John Augustine I's reign, this royalist attitude helped him remain loyal back home to his Floridian Party roots, as the anti-royalist movement took a turn for centralism.

[5] Juan III's was the first victory by someone not born a member of the East Florida elite. Under his tenure, slavery was abolished in East Florida, and a strong coalition of agrarian, poor, mestizo and afrofloridian factions emerged. Quasadianism has significantly shaped East Floridian political discourse and was adopted and then adapted by his successor. Juan III's victory and tenure completely changed East Florida politics, and ushered in an era of left-wing populism that has governed the realm for 135 of the last 151 years.

[6] Pedro II is the most famous East Floridian lord-governor confederation wide without question, having twice been elected. He is the only Governor-President in confederation history to have been re-called, and he was the first Governor-President to regain the title after having lost it. Pedro II holds the record for longest tenure as lord-governor in East Florida at 46 years. Hand in hand, he holds the record for youngest person elected lord-governor in realm history, having been just 35 at the time he assumed the position. Pedro was also the first lord-governor of the Farmer-Labor Party, orchestrating the Agrarian Peoples Party's merger with the growing Workingmans Party in 1911. Adapting his predecessors leftist, populist ideology, Pedro developed his own ideology known as Santanismo, which blended attitudes of realmism with confederationalism, and left-wing populism. To date, he is the only Governor-President in confederation history to have learned a language other than English first.

[7] Felipe is the only lord-governor elected from the Holy Democratic Party (which later became the modern Christian Democratic Party) and his tenure saw consistent conflict between himself and the East Florida legislature, which was staunchly Farmer-Labor throughout most of his time in power.

[8] Ricardo Tapanes is the oldest person to hold the office of lord-governor in East Florida, passing away at the age of 84. His tenure in office is the second-longest behind Pedro II's and marked 62 consecutive years of Farmer-Labor control of the East Florida executive office. The population growth that has occurred in East Florida throughout the 20th century peaked during his tenure as a result of his moderate migration policies and support for immigration into the realm, and stark contrast from his predecessors. This would ultimately hurt his party, however, as the Farmer-Labor Party began losing popularity as the 21st century rolled around.

[9] Juan Carlos became the first non-Farmer-Labor member to be elected to the office since Lord-Governor Felipe, and the first Liberal-Centralist elected in that party's history. Juan Carlos's victory came alongside an astonishing first place showing by his party in the concurrent 2014 East Florida general election and the crafting of a coalition that removed the Farmer-Labor Party from control of the realm's legislature. Juan Carlos's tenure has so far been popular, and his coalition made gains in the 2017 East Florida general election.

Same TL as:
- List of Counts of Massachusetts Bay
 
1989-1993: Vice President George Bush (Republican)
1988: (with Dan Quayle): Michael Dukakis / Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic)
1992: (with Dan Quayle): Paul Tsongas / Al Gore (Democratic); Ross Perot / James Stockdale (Independent)

1993-1997: Vice President Dan Quayle (Republican)
1997-2005: Senator Lloyd Bentsen (Democratic)

1996: (with Bill Clinton): Dan Quayle / Lamar Alexander (Republican); Ross Perot / Pat Choate (Reform)
2000: (with Joe Lieberman): Jack Kemp / Carroll Campbell (Republican); Pat Buchanan / Virgil Goode (Reform)

2005-2009: Vice President Joe Lieberman (Democratic)
2004: (with Paul Sarbanes): Rick Santorum / John Engler (Republican); Paul Wellstone / Roberto Mondragon (Green)
2009-2017: Governor Bob Riley (Republican)
2008: (with Chuck Hagel): Joe Lieberman / Paul Sarbanes (Democratic)
2012: (with Chuck Hagel): John Edwards / Elena Kagan (Democratic)

2017-0000: Governor Andrew Cuomo (Democratic)
2016: (with Carol Moseley Braun): Karen Kwiatkowski / Phil Bryant (Republican)
 
@redjirachi the self=proclaimed 'Stalwart of the Stalwarts' Charles Guiteau would probably not have shot Grant had the former president been in office in 1881. Unless still denied a patronage opportunity, but the point of the Conkling faction was to reward loyalty over talent.
 
I don't know what this is or why I made it, but here you go.

1977-1981: Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/John Glenn (D-OH)
Def. 1976 Gerald Ford (R-MI)/Bob Dole (R-KS)
1981-1986: Ronald Reagan (R-CA)/Donald Rumsfeld (R-IL)
Def. 1980 Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/John Glenn (D-OH)
Def. 1984 Gary Hart (D-CO)/Geraldine Ferraro (D-NY)

1986-1987: Ronald Reagan (R-CA)/ Vacant
1987-1987: Ronald Reagan (R-CA)/Bob Dole (R-KS)
1987-1989: Bob Dole (R-KS)/ Vacant
1989-1993: Robert F. Kennedy (D-NY)/Jesse Jackson (D-SC)

Def. 1988 George H.W. Bush (R-TX)/John H. Sununu (R-NH), Ron Paul (Libertarian-TX)/David Koch (Libertarian-NY)
1993-1997: Jesse Jackson (D-SC)/John Kerry (D-MA)
Def. 1992 Pat Buchanan (R-VA)/John Ashcroft (R-MO)
1997-2001: Steve Forbes (R-NY)/Elizabeth Dole (R-NC)
Def. 1996 Jesse Jackson (D-SC)/John Kerry (D-MA)
2001-2009: John Kerry (D-MA)/Bill Richardson (D-NM)
Def. 2000 Steve Forbes (R-NY)/Elizabeth Dole (R-NC)
Def. 2004 Chuck Hagel (R-NE)/Bill Frist (R-TN)

2009-2017: Bobby Jindal (R-LA)/Mitt Romney (R-MA)
Def. 2008 Bill Richardson (D-NM)/Mark Warner (D-VA)
Def. 2012 Kathleen Sebelius (D-KS)/Chris Murphy (D-CT)

2017-2020: John F. Kennedy, Jr. (D-NY)/Tulsi Gabbard (D-HI)
Def. 2016 Mitt Romney (R-MA)/Ted Cruz (R-TX)
 
Last edited:
Presidents of the United States (1897-1923)
William McKinley/Garrett Hobart 1897-1905

1896: Def. William Jennings Bryan/Thomas E. Watson
1900: Def. William Jennings Bryan/Adlai Stevenson
Champ Clark/Alton B. Parker 1905-1909

1904: Def. Mark Hanna/Charles W. Fairbanks, Eugene Debs/Benjamin Hanford
Hiram Johnson/Philander C. Knox 1909-1910 (Assassinated)
1908: Def. Champ Clark/Alton B. Parker, Eugene Debs/Benjamin Hanford
Philander C. Knox/vacant 1910-1913
Philander C. Knox/William Howard Taft 1913-1917

1912: Def. Robert La Follette/Victor L. Berger, A. Mitchell Palmer/Oscar Underwood, Eugene Debs/Emil Seidel
Robert La Follette/Burton K. Wheeler 1917-1921 (Overthrown)
1916: Def. Thomas R. Marshall/John W. Davis, Eugene Debs/Bill Haywood, William Howard Taft/Charles Evans Hughes
1920: Def. Al Smith/Andrew Mellon, Morris Hillquit/Seymour Stedman
John Pershing/Henry Ford 1921-1923 (Overthrown)

Presidents of the American People's Democratic Republic (1921-
Eugene Debs/Smedley Butler 1921-1922 (Died in office)
Smedley Butler/vacant 1922-1925

Huey Long/Jacob Coxey 1925-1930
1925: Def. Norman Thomas/Jeremiah Crowley, William Z. Foster/Benjamin Gitlow, Emma Goldman/Joseph Labadie, Herbert Hoover/Calvin Coolidge
Norman Thomas/Verne L. Reynolds 1930-1945
1930: Def. William Z. Foster/Earl Browder, Huey Long/Jacob Coxey, Emma Goldman/Leonard Abbott, Franklin D. Roosevelt/William Borah
1935: Def. Jacob Coxey/William H. Harvey, Earl Browder/James Ford, Franklin D. Roosevelt/Wendell Wilkie, Rockwell Kent/Alexander Berkman
1940: Def. William Lemke/Claude A. Watson, Thomas Dewey/Alben Barkley, William Z. Foster/James Ford, George Bellows/Sam Dolgoff
Henry Wallace/Happy Chandler 1945-1955
1945: Def. Upton Sinclair/John W. Aiken, Cordell Hull/Harold Stassen, Robert Duncan/Dorothy Day, Alger Hiss/Benjamin Gitlow
1950: Def. Darlington Hoopes/Glen H. Taylor, Dwight D. Eisenhower/Adlai Stevenson, Robert Duncan/Dorothy Day
Vincent Hallinan/Hugo Oehler 1955-1960
1955: Def. Happy Chandler/Philip La Follette, Henry Cabot Lodge, Jr./Pat Brown, Norman Mailer/Jack Kerouac
Richard Nixon/John F. Kennedy 1960-1970
1960: Def. Estes Kefauver/Hubert Humphrey, Vincent Hallinan/Hugo Oehler, Jack Kerouac/Allen Ginsberg
1965: Def. Eric Hass/Farrell M, George McGovern/Eugene McCarthy, Martin Luther King, Jr./Gloria Steinem, Murray Bookchin/Karl Hess
Hubert Humphrey/Mark Hatfield 1970-1975
1970: Def. Henning Blomen/Paul Sweezy, Richard Nixon/John Lindsey, Martin Luther King, Jr./Russell Means, Murray Bookchin/Carl Oglesby
Bayard Rustin/Michael Harrington 1975-1985
1975: Def. Hubert Humphrey/Mark Hatfield, Robert F. Kennedy/Jerry Brown, Thurgood Marshall/Caesar Chavez, Noam Chomsky/Ron Paul
1980: Def. Jimmy Stewart/Jimmy Carter, John B. Anderson/Gary Hart, Margaret Benson/John Lewis, Noam Chomsky/Abbie Hoffman
Mike Gravel/Bob Dole 1985-1990
1985: Def. Michael Harrington/Gus Hall, Jerry Brown/Jim Jeffords, Howard Zinn/Russell Means, Lenora Fulani/Jesse Jackson, Lyndon LaRouche/David Duke
Brian Moore/Victor Reuther 1990-1995
1990: Def. Mike Gravel/Bob Dole, Lincoln Chafee/Paul Tsongas, Jesse Jackson/Mary King, Eric Boucher/Fredy Perlman, John Hagelin/Marianne Williamson, Lyndon LaRouche/David Duke
Mike Gravel/Ralph Nader 1995-2000
1995: Def. Brian Moore/Victor Reuther, John Lewis/Barbara Lee, Ted Bundy/Howard Dean, Eric Boucher/Dave Van Ronk, John Hagelin/Clint Eastwood
Ralph Nader/Jesse Ventura 2000-2005
2000: Def. Lenora Fulani/Bernie Sanders, Jerry Brown/John McCain, Sheila Jackson Lee/Clarence Thomas, Ron Paul/Malik Rahim, John Hagelin/Harold Bloomfield
Frank Llewyn/Mary Landrieu 2005-2015
2005: Def. Ralph Nader/Jesse Ventura, Angus King/John Kasich, Ron Paul/David Graeber, Heather Booth/Harvey Milk, Marianne Williamson/Nat Goldhabar
2010: Def. Colin Powell/Gary Locke, Jesse Ventura/Rick Perry Harvey Milk/Harold Ford, Jr., Anthony Pollina/Keith McHenry, David Lynch/Deepak Chopra
Rocky Anderson/Jim Webb 2015-2020
2015: Def. Maria Svart/Dennis Kucinich, Andrew Cuomo/Brian Sandoval, Barney Frank/Mia Love, Kevin Carson/Mumia Abu-Jamal, Deepak Chopra/John Gray
Lee Carter/Charlie Baker 2020-
2020: Def. Rocky Anderson/Jim Webb, Rocky de La Fuente/Ron Wyden, John Mond/Julian Castro, Vermin Supreme/Howard Ehrlich, Marianne Williamson/Andrew Yang

Blue-Republican
Orange-Democrat
Dark green-Progressive
Gray-Independent
Red-Socialist
Light green-Farmer-Labor
Teal-Liberal
Yellow-Libertarian

Dark purple-Communist
Dark blue-Equal Rights
Purple-Spiritualist
 
Last edited:
Annus Horribilis

Presidents of the United States:
11/1963-1/1968: Lyndon B. Johnson (Democratic) ✞
died of heart attack
1/1968-6/1968: Hubert H. Humphrey (Democratic) ✞
assassinated, Sirhan Sirhan, Los Angeles, CA
6/1968-8/1968: John W. McCormack (Democratic) ®
resigned in favor of Democratic nominee Daniel Inouye
8/1968-9/1968: Daniel Inouye (Democratic) ®
resigned due to scandal
9/1968-1/1969: Mo Udall (Democratic)
1/1969-4/1969: Ronald Reagan (Republican) ✞
(with Donald Rumsfeld) def. Mo Udall (Democratic, unofficial "Anti-War"), Daniel Inouye (Democratic, campaign withdrawn), scattered favorite sons (Democratic); George C. Wallace (National Independent Movement); Noam Chomsky (Peace and Freedom)
died in plane crash, Las Animas County, CO (en route from Los Angeles to Edwards AFB)
4/1969-5/1969: Donald Rumsfeld (Republican) ✞
assassinated, Naomi Jaffe, Baltimore, MD
5/1969-5/1969: Wilbur Mills (Democratic) ®
resigned due to scandal
5/1969-5/1969: John Brademas (Democratic) ®
resigned in favor of Secretary of Defense Curtis LeMay (President pro tempore of the Senate vacant; Secretary of State Henry Kissinger ineligible)
5/1969-: Curtis LeMay (Republican)

The Tet Offensive was a shock to the nation, but its most high-profile victim was half a world away. Lyndon Johnson, with a heart attack in his past and more in his family tree, went to the great brush-clearing ranch in the sky on hearing the news that the Viet Cong had, in a coordinated attack, cracked the skies and shaken the earth at bases from Khe Sanh near the border to Can Tho in the middle of the Mekong Delta. Walter Cronkite's voice cracked when he read the news; across the United States, outside a few radicals on either side, the American people forgot their grievances against LBJ and mourned the architect of the Great Society, consumed by the war he had never wanted to deal with.

His successor did not receive any forbearance as a result of that. As he fought for peace negotiations in Vietnam, as well as fair housing and full employment at home, he dithered over his choice of vice president for two months. John Connally, Lyndon's protege and Governor of Texas, was the top choice until allegations of corruption leapt from the Texas Observer to the Washington Post; then Ed Muskie, Catholic Polack from Maine, faced criticism because of his trips around California with mobbed-up Frank Sinatra; Cy Vance was too much of an insider, Fred Harris too much of an outsider, and Bobby Kennedy would have made LBJ spin in his grave so loud you could hear it from Washington.

When he finally settled on Dan Inouye, the decorated Japanese-American infantry veteran of the Second World War who lost his right arm on his way up through Italy and served with distinction in Congress, the next phase of the fight began. Plenty of Southern senators were skeptical of Inouye for his race even if they had the common decency not to say it in so many words, and anti-war Senators were concerned about the prospect of a Humphrey administration defending the status quo on Vietnam against charges of racism and cruelty to American servicemen by trotting out a token Asian veteran. Sam Ervin, defense attorney of segregation, worked with even-tempered wonkish Arkansas liberal Bill Fulbright to make sure the Senate deliberated as methodically as possible in the process of advice and consent; where they fell short, bomb-throwers Strom Thurmond and Gene McCarthy found an uncomfortable common cause in screwing with the nomination process.

By June, though, things were falling through in the "Stop Inouye" effort. Democrats were falling in line, while Republicans found reason to like Inouye in his hawkishness on China and the potential of looking nice and tolerant. Many of them had come to conclude that the Humphrey administration had been suitably chastened by the effort, as well as Allard Lowenstein's protest candidacy. And then some radical shot the President, again, over Israel of all the damn things, and a whole bunch of people regretted their decisions.

In the hot seat, John McCormack mostly just sat there and hoped nothing drastic happened before the Democratic National Convention. More prosaically, he let the Cabinet, essentially inherited from three presidents ago, govern on its own. As student radicals declared communes in Boston and the college towns of Michigan, brought down governments in France, and got splashed on the front page of the New York Times cut down by army bullets in Mexico and South Korea, that was hardly a given. At least the DNC in Chicago went well; radicals were too busy building new societies in upstate New York and northern Michigan, backing Lakota resistance in South Dakota, and fighting cops to defend the Boston Commune to bother with something so bourgeoisie. Despite last-minute challenges by a number of minor candidates, most notably Robert Kennedy, Daniel Inouye won the nomination on the first ballot. As McCormack maneuvered the pliable House to declare Inouye Speaker, then vacated the Presidency to allow him in, things looked up for the Democratic Party even despite the slog Inouye was going to have against Governor Reagan.

Then came the allegations. A number of women had come forward back during the VP nomination process to say that Senator Inouye had sexually harassed or even raped them; sex crimes were, of course, not uncommon in Washington even in this era of rising feminism, but the allegations were still serious enough that the papers felt a duty to do due diligence before confirming the stories. As the news passed through the machinery of the news media, a number of the women - both Inouye's victims and more than a few women at the papers frustrated with the way male management was handling the issue - handed the story off to nascent conservative media like the Union-Leader. Soon, the story was being passed through the swing states at a rate neither the media nor the campaign could ignore.

Within a month of his rise to the nomination, Inouye had to drop out of the race. His vice presidential nominee, the moderate Missourian Tom Eagleton, had yet to percolate his way through the nomination process - he abruptly resigned, anyway, before news of some kind of mental health issue made its way to the papers. That left Mo Udall: the tall, dryly humorous, Arizonan who had won a shock victory against establishment choice Hale Boggs to succeed Inouye in the Speakership.

Unlike McCormack, Udall was comfortable as an acting President. With no clear Democratic nominee, he even felt like he had a legitimate chance at the nomination, with several state Democratic parties choosing to replace Inouye on the ballot. Others kept him but released their electors, or nominated some popular favorite sons from their home states. It didn't end up mattering when Governor Reagan muscled past him to win the election, but Udall still governed the country, overseeing negotiations in Vietnam and with the Soviet Union and pressing for stronger antitrust regulations on the energy industry. Still, as a lame duck for literally the majority of his Presidency, nobody was willing to give him too long of a leash.

Reagan faced a breath of fresh air on entering the Presidency - within his first month, negotiations between North and South Vietnam made significant leaps, leading to the Treaty of Mumbai. Not only that - with Bretton Woods beginning to show its age in a new era, one where West Germany was no longer so willing to march to the drumbeat of the American Treasury, he began drawing up plans to create a New World Order. While he was never able to see the fruits of his labors, the historians honor him for them.

Invited as a special guest, the former actor attended the 42nd Academy Awards. On his way over the Rockies, Air Force One faced a shock power failure and crashed, leaving his vice president - a boring, corporate, Congressman from Illinois - to continue the Reagan legacy.

Rumsfeld didn't have the same talent for papering over disagreements as Reagan. It showed - on civil rights, Rumsfeld tried to broker a compromise on busing and ethnic studies, with the "help" of prickly liberal academic Secretary of Education John Silber. This duly got everyone annoyed with him, but perhaps nobody was more ticked off than the Black Liberation Army, which sent white ally and veteran of the Boston Commune Naomi Jaffe down to Baltimore, where the president was set to tour some of the newly integrated schools, to end his "reformist attempts at co-opting the liberation struggle" once and for all with a car full of explosives.

Wilbur Mills was not an ideal choice for his successor, but he was especially not an ideal choice at that moment. A powerful Arkansan with a history of alcoholism, Mills had run into trouble with the Capitol Police when they stopped a car with him and a scrum of five other drunk people, including an Argentinian stripper with whom he had gotten in some kind of altercation, near the Jefferson Memorial. Mills had already decided to resign from the Speakership when he suddenly became President. After a brief call to his successor, John Brademas (the House had, blessedly, adopted new rules regarding succession to the Speakership), and some tracking-down of paperwork, Wilbur Mills ended his presidency just short of the forty-five-minute mark. Brademas, an even-tempered Midwestern Rhodes Scholar and the first Greek-American President, spent a full day as President, but felt that to ascend to the Presidency as a liberal Democrat when the people had elected a conservative Republican was probably a bad thing for the country.

The line of succession passed on. After Arizona's Carl Hayden had died in his sleep, the seat of president pro tempore had been left vacant. The German-born Secretary of State was ineligible. But the Secretary of Defense, the hawkish career Air Force officer who had overseen the firebombing of Tokyo and the Berlin airlift. He had been offered a slot as running mate to George Wallace, but had passed it up in favor of advising Ronald Reagan on defense policy, eventually bushwhacking his way through tense Senate hearings to the Department of Defense. Now, he was the President of the United States. And there was no telling what came next for the 45th President of the United States.
 
"I Saw Tiger, and I Understand"

1981-1989: Fmr. Gov. Ronald Reagan / Fmr. C.I.A. Dir. George Bush (Republican)

def. 1980: Pres. Jimmy Carter / Vice Pres. Walter Mondale (Democratic); Rep. John B. Anderson / Gov. Patrick Lucey (Independent)
def. 1984: Fmr. Vice Pres. Walter Mondale / Rep. Geraldine Ferraro (Democratic)

1989-1993: Fmr. Gov. Chuck Robb / Sen. Paul Simon (Democratic)
def. 1988: Vice Pres. George Bush / Sen. Dan Quayle (Republican); Rep. Ron Paul / Fmr. Sen. Mike Gravel (Libertarian)
1993-1997: Sen. Phil Gramm / Sen. John McCain (Republican)
def. 1992: Pres. Chuck Robb / Vice Pres. Paul Simon (Democratic); Rep. Ron Paul / Economist Mike Munger (Libertarian)
1997-2005: Sen. John Kerry / Sen. Bob Graham (Democratic)
def. 1996: Pres. Phil Gramm / Vice Pres. John McCain (Republican)
def. 2000: Vice Pres. John McCain / Sen. Bill Frist (Republican)

2005-2013: Gov. Gary Johnson / Sen. Olympia Snowe (Republican)
def. 2004: Vice Pres. Bob Graham / Sen. Barbara Mikulski (Democratic)
def. 2008: Sen. Russ Feingold / Gov. Dave Freudenthal (Democratic)

2013-2021: Sen. Mark Dayton / Gov. Carole Baskin (Democratic)
def. 2012: Vice Pres. Olympia Snowe / House Min. Whip J.C. Watts (Republican)
def. 2016: Sen. Mike Huckabee / Sen. Kelly Ayotte (Republican)

2021-0000: Fmr. Gov. Joe Maldonado / Sen. Tim Scott (Republican)
def. 2020: Vice Pres. Carole Baskin / Gov. Cheri Bustos (Democratic)

The POD is Chuck Robb running for and winning the presidency in 1988. His and Vice President Bush's hawkish tendencies alienate the non-interventionists in each party, causing them to flock to the Libertarian ticket of Ron Paul and Mike Gravel, which does well enough in the polls to get them on the debate stage. As a result, the Libertarian party puts up a pretty good showing in the general election and is kept afloat going into 1992. Bush's- and later Gramm's- defeat takes the wind out of the sails of the GOP, allowing Libertarians to stake a claim under the guise of supporting the Republicans' low tax philosophy.

Meanwhile, Bob Graham ascending to the Vice Presidency causes a power vaccuum in the Florida Democratic Party, allowing recent widow and animal rights-activist-turned-progressive human rights champion Carole Baskin to capture a Tampa-based state senate seat, from which she spends the next few years climbing through the ranks until she and her progressive supporters- also known as "Carole's Cats"- take the Governor's Mansion. She eventually becomes selected by Senator Mark Dayton to be his VP in order to lock down the female and progressive support blocs.

Elsewhere (actually, in Oklahoma), local businessman and TV/Radio Personality Joe Maldonado seized the Governorship of Oklahoma as a "Johnson Republican" with a known maverick streak. His exuberant personality allows him to trounce the mainstream, straitlaced Republican primary field, setting him up for a 2020 election match against Vice President Baskin. Ultimately, Maldonado won, despite his own seedy practices being put on display. This is probably due to the campaign being historically dirty, with Maldonado also accusing Baskin of murdering her first husband, Don Lewis- an unsubstantiated claim, considering he likely fled to Costa Rica considering that they were in the process of a divorce, but it's one that picked up steam on the political fringe.


Among other major stories of 2020, there's the continuing coronavirus outbreak and the massively popular "Steak King" Netflix series, based around the misadventures of the boisterous New York-based beef salesman Donald "Don American" Trump and his longstanding feud with the Queens County prosecutor and modern muckraker Hillary Rodham.
 
"I Saw Tiger, and I Understand"

1981-1989: Fmr. Gov. Ronald Reagan / Fmr. C.I.A. Dir. George Bush (Republican)

def. 1980: Pres. Jimmy Carter / Vice Pres. Walter Mondale (Democratic); Rep. John B. Anderson / Gov. Patrick Lucey (Independent)
def. 1984: Fmr. Vice Pres. Walter Mondale / Rep. Geraldine Ferraro (Democratic)

1989-1993: Fmr. Gov. Chuck Robb / Sen. Paul Simon (Democratic)
def. 1988: Vice Pres. George Bush / Sen. Dan Quayle (Republican); Rep. Ron Paul / Fmr. Sen. Mike Gravel (Libertarian)
1993-1997: Sen. Phil Gramm / Sen. John McCain (Republican)
def. 1992: Pres. Chuck Robb / Vice Pres. Paul Simon (Democratic); Rep. Ron Paul / Economist Mike Munger (Libertarian)
1997-2005: Sen. John Kerry / Sen. Bob Graham (Democratic)
def. 1996: Pres. Phil Gramm / Vice Pres. John McCain (Republican)
def. 2000: Vice Pres. John McCain / Sen. Bill Frist (Republican)

2005-2013: Gov. Gary Johnson / Sen. Olympia Snowe (Republican)
def. 2004: Vice Pres. Bob Graham / Sen. Barbara Mikulski (Democratic)
def. 2008: Sen. Russ Feingold / Gov. Dave Freudenthal (Democratic)

2013-2021: Sen. Mark Dayton / Gov. Carole Baskin (Democratic)
def. 2012: Vice Pres. Olympia Snowe / House Min. Whip J.C. Watts (Republican)
def. 2016: Sen. Mike Huckabee / Sen. Kelly Ayotte (Republican)

2021-0000: Fmr. Gov. Joe Maldonado / Sen. Tim Scott (Republican)
def. 2020: Vice Pres. Carole Baskin / Gov. Cheri Bustos (Democratic)

The POD is Chuck Robb running for and winning the presidency in 1988. His and Vice President Bush's hawkish tendencies alienate the non-interventionists in each party, causing them to flock to the Libertarian ticket of Ron Paul and Mike Gravel, which does well enough in the polls to get them on the debate stage. As a result, the Libertarian party puts up a pretty good showing in the general election and is kept afloat going into 1992. Bush's- and later Gramm's- defeat takes the wind out of the sails of the GOP, allowing Libertarians to stake a claim under the guise of supporting the Republicans' low tax philosophy.

Meanwhile, Bob Graham ascending to the Vice Presidency causes a power vaccuum in the Florida Democratic Party, allowing recent widow and animal rights-activist-turned-progressive human rights champion Carole Baskin to capture a Tampa-based state senate seat, from which she spends the next few years climbing through the ranks until she and her progressive supporters- also known as "Carole's Cats"- take the Governor's Mansion. She eventually becomes selected by Senator Mark Dayton to be his VP in order to lock down the female and progressive support blocs.

Elsewhere (actually, in Oklahoma), local businessman and TV/Radio Personality Joe Maldonado seized the Governorship of Oklahoma as a "Johnson Republican" with a known maverick streak. His exuberant personality allows him to trounce the mainstream, straitlaced Republican primary field, setting him up for a 2020 election match against Vice President Baskin. Ultimately, Maldonado won, despite his own seedy practices being put on display. This is probably due to the campaign being historically dirty, with Maldonado also accusing Baskin of murdering her first husband, Don Lewis- an unsubstantiated claim, considering he likely fled to Costa Rica considering that they were in the process of a divorce, but it's one that picked up steam on the political fringe.


Among other major stories of 2020, there's the continuing coronavirus outbreak and the massively popular "Steak King" Netflix series, based around the misadventures of the boisterous New York-based beef salesman Donald "Don American" Trump and his longstanding feud with the Queens County prosecutor and modern muckraker Hillary Rodham.
Nice. I only think pretty unlikely for a former Vice-President McCain running against a sitting President Kerry...
 
King of England and Ireland:
1485-1509: Henry VII Tudor
1509-1552: Arthur I Tudor
1559-1566: Edward VI Tudor
1566-1572: Henry VIII Tudor
King of England, Ireland and Poland, Grand Duke of Lithuania:
1572-1603: Henry VIII and V Tudor
1603-1641: Arthur II and I Tudor
1641-1684: Edward VII and I Tudor
King of England, Ireland, Poland and Lithuania:
1684-1691: Edward VII and I Tudor
1691-1744: Henry IX and VI Tudor
Disputed:
1744-1766: King of the Scots, of Ireland and of England: James VII and I Stuart
1744-1756: King of England, Ireland and Poland, Grand Duke of Lithuania: John II Tudor, 2nd Duke of Lublin
1744-1766: Queen of England, Ireland and Lithuania, King of Poland: Elisabeth I Tudor
Disputed:
1766-1775: King of the Scots, of Ireland and of England: Charles III and I Stuart
1766-1775: Queen of England, Ireland and Lithuania, King of Poland: Elisabeth I Tudor
Disputed:
1775-1776: King of the Scots, of Ireland and of England: Charles III and I Stuart
1775-1776: King of England, Ireland, Poland and Lithuania: George I Hanover
Disputed:
1776-1780: King of the Scots, of Ireland and of England: Charles III and I Stuart
1776-1780: King of England, Ireland, Poland, Lithuania and America: George I Hanover
Disputed:
1780-1788: King of Great Britain: Charles III Stuart
1780-1788: King of England, Ireland, Poland, Lithuania and America: George I Hanover
Disputed:
1788-1795: King of Great Britain: Henry X Stuart
1788-1795: King of England, Ireland, Poland, Lithuania and America: George I Hanover
King of England, Ireland, Poland, Lithuania and America:
1795-1801: George I Hanover
King/Queen of the (United) Commonwealth:
1801-1820: George I Hanover
1820-1830: George II Hanover
1830-1837: William IV Hanover
1837-1901: Victoria I Hanover (Personal Union with Hanover ended)
1901-1910: George III Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
1910-1936: Alice I Saxe-Coburg and Gotha
1936-Present: John VII Braganza (Portugal united in a personal union with the Commonwealth and later fully united)


A list for the Monarchs for one of the mega-nations in and ASB scenario I envisioned. Nations other than the (United) Commonwealth are the (French) Republic, the (European) Confederation (Prussian led, includes Germany, Sweden, Denmark, OTL Austria-Hungary, Italy and Spain), the (Soviet) Union, the (Latin American) League (more NATO-EU like instead of a true Mega-Nation. Includes Republics and Monarchies), the (Chinese) Federation and the (Ottoman) Empire. Planning to do a map too.

Edit: need to add this: Present is not 2020. I am not sure when it is yet but it is in the 1950s at the latest.
 
Last edited:
Top