Although the Union of Soviet Sovereign Republics was ideally a Federation, authority was centered around Moscow. The entity known as the Russian Soviet Federal Sovereign Republic (Rossiyskaya Sovetskaya Federativnaya Suverennaya Respublika, or RSFSR) was at the center of this, projected influence over the rest of the Sovereign Republics (Byelorussian, Tajik, Kazakh, Kyrgyz, Turkmen, and Uzbek) until 2001. Because of Mikhail Gorbachev's reforms, many of these republics were attracted to staying under the wing of the Russians.

Here is the flag of the RSFSR: It is a mostly red banner, symbolizing allegiance to a more moderated form of Russian Socialism, while the colors of the old Russian flag are displayed as a fimbriation. The Russian Double-headed eagle is without its normal crowns to symbolize that Russia has no sympathies or nostalgia for the former monarchy, while the Orb and Scepter are representative of both the authority of the state and the authority of the Orthodox Church and the patriarchs. The Red Escutcheon symbolizes Socialism.

flag - 2022-05-09T083915.814.png


RSFSR.png

Alternate Version with St George and the Dragon
 
Last edited:
I am working on some flags for a game that I am a part of. If you haven't heard of it it is called This Spectred Isle. It is absolutely great! I would like to know which one of these flags is most appealing to you. If none of them are or you want to suggest something; I am more than welcome to constructive criticism.
Option 1 -

United Avalon Flag 1.png


Option 2 -

United Avalon Flag 1 (1).png


Option 3 -

United Avalon Flag 1 (2).png


Option 4 -

flag (10).png
 
I am working on some flags for a game that I am a part of. If you haven't heard of it it is called This Spectred Isle. It is absolutely great! I would like to know which one of these flags is most appealing to you. If none of them are or you want to suggest something; I am more than welcome to constructive criticism.
Depends on the symbolism you're going for. I think option 4 is the most straightforward but the bottom stripe might merge with a white background, depending on how your game is presented. Option 3 works on all backgrounds but the yellow is too bright.
 
oh these rule! what's the symbolism of each?
They all reference and are influenced by the mission insignias of the respective space missions of their namesakes.
Armstrong-the Gemini 8 insignia with the prism casting the rainbow from the light of the two stars on the left Castor and Pollux with the insignia being from the Apollo 11 mission. The shape of the flag is to honor Armstrongs' home state of Ohio.
Aldrin-the crescent moon comes from the Gemini 11. On the shield you have the roman numeral 11 obviously for Apollo 11 in the top left of the shield, the Tomahawk on the top right references his service as part of the 16th Fighter-Interceptor Squadron, the wing on the bottom left his service in the 39th fighter-interceptor squadron, and then finally the Gemini spacecraft in the bottom right.
Shepard-the Mercury symbol with the seven comes from the symbol for the Mercury 7 of which Shepard was a part of, and in the orbit of the the insignia is an astronauts pin that was on the Apollo 14 insignia.
 
Depends on the symbolism you're going for. I think option 4 is the most straightforward but the bottom stripe might merge with a white background, depending on how your game is presented. Option 3 works on all backgrounds but the yellow is too bright.
It is on Alternate History so the white will show up.:) Thank you for telling me about the yellow too. I will change that.
 
You know the Belarusian variant is already the opposition (and also former) flag of Belarus, yes?
I do indeed. That is why I put it there. Sorry, should have clarified. In fact, I will edit my post and put it on there.

Edit: The posts are gone because I exceeded the image limit. I did not know there was an image limit, but now I do. Thank you, Gobkay.
 
Last edited:
I do indeed. That is why I put it there. Sorry, should have clarified. In fact, I will edit my post and put it on there.

My point is mostly that your post seemingly presented the Russian Peace Flag as the originator of this style, when it was likely inspired by the White-Red-White Belarusian flag.
 
My point is mostly that your post seemingly presented the Russian Peace Flag as the originator of this style, when it was likely inspired by the White-Red-White Belarusian flag.
I cannot say for certain if you are right or wrong. I know the Russian peace flag was invented by two Russian digital artists who had no connection with the Belarusian opposition. However, they may or may not have been inspired by the flag, though their stated reason was simply to remove the red part of the flag which they saw as a symbol of Russia's Imperial past.
 
Btw, do keep in mind the 3 images per day per thread limit.

I don't really mind it, and won't report you, but the mods do dislike it.
 
Btw, do keep in mind the 3 images per day per thread limit.

I don't really mind it, and won't report you, but the mods do dislike it.
Oh my gosh! I didn't know about that rule. I am sorry. That is totally my bad. But I will keep that in mind for the future. I have deleted the posts for now anyways. I will admit that the flags were a little lazy and put together haphazardly, so I maybe would have just deleted them on my own time. But thank you for your advice--I will heed it in the future.
 
Last edited:
While Iran has always been the center of my personal historical fascination, Iraq has also been on my horizon. Mesopotamia stands at the crossroads of Europe, the Caucasus, and the rest of Asia. It's an area that has seen dramatic highs and lows--from the Birth of Civilization--to the many, many times Mesopotamia has been conquered by outside empires (e.g., The Achaemenids, Alexander the Great, The Romans, the Sassanids, the Seljuks the Mongols, the Ottomans, the Safavids, British, and recently, the United States, and many more)--from the Islamic Golden Age, which turned Baghdad into the greatest city in the world, to the Mongol Conquest and Baghdad's subsequent fall from grace. History, it seems, has been one big roller-coaster ride for this region that has never really stopped. Arguably, there are few better places in the world for an archaeologist or a historian to be. The palaces we see today sit on top of the palaces of countless other empires that lie beneath the substratum. The poem "Ozymandias" comes to mind.

Truth be told, Mesopotamia and Iraq have not recovered their influence from the time of the Golden Age. The Iraq of today is sandwiched between a cacaphony of violence--from war-torn Syria, to the recent ISIL Crisis, to it's hungry and powerful neighbors, Iran and Turkey. A delicate tight-rope must be walked, and good leadership must be put in place if Iraq is to survive the coming decades without getting scorched--again.

While I don't mind the two Arab national flags--the OG, exemplified by Jordan, and the Arab Liberation Flag used by Egypt, Yemen, Syria, and Iraq, they can be rather plain, so I added the traditional side-triangle (what is it called again?) of Arab flags to Iraq's, making it green to symbolize the southern, swampy lowlands of Mesoptamia and the Shatt-al-Arab. I also added two dividing lines between the Red-White-Black tricolor to symbolize the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the lifeblood of Iraq. The green also symbolizes Islam.
While the Kufic script version of "God is Great" on the front of the current-day Iraq flag is indeed striking, it is also symbolic of the days of the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, when Saddam Hussein scribbled the words onto the flag (albeit, in a slightly different form) to inspire his troops to fight back against the U.S. Forces. Though one should never forget war and it's consequences, it's probably for the best if Iraq forgets Saddam. So I got rid of the words on the flag. Finally, I added a star of Ishtar, a traditional symbol of both the Goddess and the Neo-Babylonian Empire, the strongest pre-Islamic state based in Iraq, and emblematic of Mesopotamia's great and storied history.

"Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, and wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command...yet survive, stamped upon these lifeless things." --Percy Bysshe Shelly

Iraq Redesign (7).png
 
Last edited:
I made a few flags for American settlements on the Moon
View attachment 740139
Flag of Armstrong
View attachment 740407
Flag of Aldrin
View attachment 740408
Flag of Shepard

These are actaully pretty great. Reminds me of @Etruscan-enthusiast35 Moon Map.

While Iran has always been the center of my personal historical fascination, Iraq has also been on my horizon. Mesopotamia stands at the crossroads of Europe, the Caucasus, and the rest of Asia. It's an area that has seen dramatic highs and lows--from the Birth of Civilization--to the many, many times Mesopotamia has been conquered by outside empires (e.g., The Achaemenids, Alexander the Great, The Romans, the Sassanids, the Seljuks the Mongols, the Ottomans, the Safavids, British, and recently, the United States, and many more)--from the Islamic Golden Age, which turned Baghdad into the greatest city in the world, to the Mongol Conquest and Baghdad's subsequent fall from grace. History, it seems, has been one big roller-coaster ride for this region that has never really stopped. Arguably, there are few better places in the world for an archaeologist or a historian to be. The palaces we see today sit on top of the palaces of countless other empires that lie beneath the substratum. The poem "Ozymandias" comes to mind.

Truth be told, Mesopotamia and Iraq have not recovered their influence from the time of the Golden Age. The Iraq of today is sandwiched between a cacaphony of violence--from war-torn Syria, to the recent ISIL Crisis, to it's hungry and powerful neighbors, Iran and Turkey. A delicate tight-rope must be walked, and good leadership must be put in place if Iraq is to survive the coming decades without getting scorched--again.

While I don't mind the two Arab national flags--the OG, exemplified by Jordan, and the Arab Liberation Flag used by Egypt, Yemen, Syria, and Iraq, they can be rather plain, so I added the traditional side-triangle (what is it called again?) of Arab flags to Iraq's, making it green to symbolize the southern, swampy lowlands of Mesoptamia and the Shatt-al-Arab. I also added two dividing lines between the Red-White-Black tricolor to symbolize the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, the lifeblood of Iraq. The green also symbolizes Islam.
While the Kufic script version of "God is Great" on the front of the current-day Iraq flag is indeed striking, it is also symbolic of the days of the 2003 Invasion of Iraq, when Saddam Hussein scribbled the words onto the flag (albeit, in a slightly different form) to inspire his troops to fight back against the U.S. Forces. Though one should never forget war and it's consequences, it's probably for the best if Iraq forgets Saddam. So I got rid of the words on the flag. Finally, I added a star of Ishtar, a traditional symbol of both the Goddess and the Neo-Babylonian Empire, the strongest pre-Islamic state based in Iraq, and emblematic of Mesopotamia's great and storied history.

"Half sunk a shattered visage lies, whose frown, and wrinkled lip, and sneer of cold command...yet survive, stamped upon these lifeless things." --Percy Bysshe Shelly

View attachment 740722

Now this I also really love. It really symbolize and represent everything about Iraq and Mesopotamia as a whole.
 
In my continuing series of Soviet Sovereign Republics (pages 73-75), I now present the Turkmen Soviet Sovereign Republic's flag. Like all of the Sovereign Republics, red remains the majority color, and the central stripe is the distinguishing point of every Republic. While I love the idea of Carpet patterns on flags, it makes everything quite complex. I don't think anyone ever has tried to accurately draw Turkmenistan's flag by hand. But everybody knows about their crescent and 5 stars, which is distinctive from any other crescent-and-star flag. I also decided to combine their main flag colors into the stripe, yellow and green, while also adding blue as a symbol of ethnic solidarity with other Turkic nations (e.g., Kazakhstan, Uzbekistan). In OTL, Turkmenistan added a wreath to the bottom of their flag to symbolize peace, so, in it's place, I made a second variant of a flag with two white outer stripes symbolizing the same thing.

While I would have loved to incorporate elements from Turkmenistan's emblem, the emblem is just the colors of the flag with the same carpet patterns and a remarkably surreal image of a horse. Seriously, it's the weirdest emblem I've seen, it's like they didn't even try with the horse and just posted a .JPG of one in the center.

While I think the state of Iran is lamentable and the condition of Syria is abhorrent, that is nothing compared to Turkmenistan. The entire country is a desert, and the capital, Ashgabat, is as surreal as that horse. It has the most white-marble buildings in the world per city, but...almost no one lives there. The highways are completely empty, all the time. It's creepy, man. Anyways, here's the flag

flag - 2022-05-12T083333.219.png

Variant 1
flag - 2022-05-12T084150.876.png

Variant 2
 
Last edited:
Top