I will do that next, PolishMagnet. I actually tried to design a Bengal flag before the Burma one, but after a long struggle I can agree with you that redesigning a Co-Prosperity Bengal flag is hard. It's unfortunate that the Bengalese color scheme is so...dull, shall we say.
Just to help you avoid painting yourself into a corner, as it were, it's important to remember that Bangladesh ≠ Bengal. Bangladesh is only a part of Bengal so its flag isn't the only OTL thing you can draw on for Bengali flags. Even more so, the earliest version of the OTL Bangladeshi flag only dates from 1970.

The Indian state of West Bengal doesn't really offer much, it's only got a seal (no flag). But the Nawabs of Bengal had their own flag, as did the fully independent pre-Mughal Bengal Sultanate. Colourwise they're both just red and white, but they'd give historical grounds for adding white to the mix and escaping the eye-jarring red-on-green.
 
The cogwheel by itself symbolizes industry: but together with the ring it makes both a stylized carriage wheel (to symbolize the agricultural sector of Burma), and a stylized Wheel of the Law (Dharma), representing the religious aspect of Burmese society. In the very center of the flag lies Japan's Rising Sun, a symbol of gratitude for Japan's liberation of Burma from foreign domination, and of Burma's willingness to cooperate with Japan and the other Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere states. The State Flag contains the Green Peacock, a traditional symbol of the Burmese government (it was the symbol of several dynasties before the State of Burma). Feel free to use for your Japanese Victory/Alternate Peace timelines!
Cool
 
So, I took Cydonius's advice (above), and decided to use a different color scheme to modern Bangladesh for my Bengal Flag. This is because Bangladesh would not exist for another 30 years after WW2, and thus none of it's national symbols would exist, certainly not it's atrociously-colored flag. However, two flags existed before--the Nawab of Bengal and the Sultanate of Bengal--that contained red-and-white. So, I decided to make those the main colors of my Bengal flag.

Though the cogwheel is commonly associated with Communist ideologies in heraldry and flags, I have decided to include it on the pretense that the Japanese would want to encourage industry in it's conquered lands. On the flag is also includes a green crescent, representing Islam, as well as 3 stars. These stars stand for the country's motto: "One Blood, one Voice, one Order," a motto shared with the State of Burma. On the civil ensign, the red-white-red tricolor draws comparisons to the old Sultanate of Bengal flag. Instead of red and green, Red and white become the national colors of Bengal, and a common theme in their new nationalist movement. The state flag has 3 bars, two thicker ones of green and red, and a white strip. The green represents the landscape of Bengal, and the red represents Japanese involvement in the struggle for independence. The white strip represents the Ganges River.


So what was my thought when making this flag? I wanted to preserve Bengal's history of independence while also introducing new symbolism...as the only symbolism on any of the Bengali flags was a few barrels and a scimitar, which seemed outdated for me, and probably would be for the Japanese too. This flag could work for both a timeline where the Japanese brutally exploit Bengal or help it, because encouraging industry doesn't necessarily mean the death of millions of people (looking at you, Mao Tse-Tung). Without further ado...

Civil Flag of the State of Bengal (1).png

Flag Variant 1 (Officially State, but bottom variant used far more often) --Used mostly in Government Buildings

Civil Flag of the State of Bengal.png

Civil Ensign (used far more often than the above flag) --Used everywhere, especially in Nationalist Rallies

(Just to be clear. This is a Japanese puppet state, part of the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere, and part of my continuing series of redesigns of that organization. )
 
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So, I took Cydonius's advice (above), and decided to use a different color scheme to modern Bangladesh for my Bengal Flag. This is because Bangladesh would not exist for another 30 years after WW2, and thus none of it's national symbols would exist, certainly not it's atrociously-colored flag. However, two flags existed before--the Nawab of Bengal and the Sultanate of Bengal--that contained red-and-white. So, I decided to make those the main colors of my Bengal flag.

Though the cogwheel is commonly associated with Communist ideologies in heraldry and flags, I have decided to include it on the pretense that the Japanese would want to encourage industry in it's conquered lands. On the flag is also includes a green crescent, representing Islam, as well as 3 stars. These stars stand for the country's motto: "One Blood, one Voice, one Order," a motto shared with the State of Burma. On the civil ensign, the red-white-red tricolor draws comparisons to the old Sultanate of Bengal flag. Instead of red and green, Red and white become the national colors of Bengal, and a common theme in their new nationalist movement. The state flag has 3 bars, two thicker ones of green and red, and a white strip. The green represents the landscape of Bengal, and the red represents Japanese involvement in the struggle for independence. The white strip represents the Ganges River.

So what was my thought when making this flag? I wanted to preserve Bengal's history of independence while also introducing new symbolism...as the only symbolism on any of the Bengali flags was a few barrels and a scimitar, which seemed outdated for me, and probably would be for the Japanese too. This flag could work for both a timeline where the Japanese brutally exploit Bengal or help it, because encouraging industry doesn't necessarily mean the death of millions of people (looking at you, Mao Tse-Tung). Without further ado...


Flag Variant 1 (Officially State, but bottom variant used far more often) --Used mostly in Government Buildings


Civil Ensign (used far more often than the above flag) --Used everywhere, especially in Nationalist Rallies
Those are gorgeous! I really like the cogwheel-and-crescent device, it works really well. Even though the juxtaposition of red and green on the Bangladeshi flag messes with my eyes, I feel it works much better here, balanced out against the white of the main field/central bar depending on which flag you're looking at. Very nice work, deLeon :)
 
Those are gorgeous! I really like the cogwheel-and-crescent device, it works really well. Even though the juxtaposition of red and green on the Bangladeshi flag messes with my eyes, I feel it works much better here, balanced out against the white of the main field/central bar depending on which flag you're looking at. Very nice work, deLeon :)
Thank you very much, Cydonius!
 
Flag Variant 1 (Officially State, but bottom variant used far more often) --Used mostly in Government Buildings
It looks fancy, but isn't it a bit too complex? There are many complex flags IOTL but those just usually have some emblem slapped on them and have variants without it, one of OTL Bangladesh flag's advantages is that it is simple and recognizable
 
It looks fancy, but isn't it a bit too complex? There are many complex flags IOTL but those just usually have some emblem slapped on them and have variants without it, one of OTL Bangladesh flag's advantages is that it is simple and recognizable

You are right--it would not fit perfectly in with the "Good Flag, Bad Flag" Regulations of NAVA. And you are also correct that modern Bangladesh's flag is very recognizable--albeit absolutely atrocious in color. But, as @Cydonius said at the top of this page," it's important to remember that Bangladesh ≠ Bengal." This is a just-post-WWII flag, made by the newly-independent Bengali people. I had to create a new national symbol that didn't exist somewhere. So, I made this, the emblem, and made it the center of my flag. It's also just my personal style for this series--you can see it on my other two Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity flags, the Empire of Vietnam and the State of Burma. I also just wanted to make something that would convey a message of "Japanese Islamic Nationalist Puppet State." The whole central emblem design thing is intentional--it subtly mimics Japan's flag, alluding to the fact that these states are indeed puppets. All the emblems are roughly circular.
 
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2021 Flag Idea - Washington St 2.5.png

Here's a redesign of the Washington state flag. The green represents the state's evergreen forests, the white represents the snow-capped mountains, and the stars and stripes come from the Washington family coat of arms.
 
So, I took Cydonius's advice (above), and decided to use a different color scheme to modern Bangladesh for my Bengal Flag. This is because Bangladesh would not exist for another 30 years after WW2, and thus none of it's national symbols would exist, certainly not it's atrociously-colored flag. However, two flags existed before--the Nawab of Bengal and the Sultanate of Bengal--that contained red-and-white. So, I decided to make those the main colors of my Bengal flag.

Though the cogwheel is commonly associated with Communist ideologies in heraldry and flags, I have decided to include it on the pretense that the Japanese would want to encourage industry in it's conquered lands. On the flag is also includes a green crescent, representing Islam, as well as 3 stars. These stars stand for the country's motto: "One Blood, one Voice, one Order," a motto shared with the State of Burma. On the civil ensign, the red-white-red tricolor draws comparisons to the old Sultanate of Bengal flag. Instead of red and green, Red and white become the national colors of Bengal, and a common theme in their new nationalist movement. The state flag has 3 bars, two thicker ones of green and red, and a white strip. The green represents the landscape of Bengal, and the red represents Japanese involvement in the struggle for independence. The white strip represents the Ganges River.


So what was my thought when making this flag? I wanted to preserve Bengal's history of independence while also introducing new symbolism...as the only symbolism on any of the Bengali flags was a few barrels and a scimitar, which seemed outdated for me, and probably would be for the Japanese too. This flag could work for both a timeline where the Japanese brutally exploit Bengal or help it, because encouraging industry doesn't necessarily mean the death of millions of people (looking at you, Mao Tse-Tung). Without further ado...

View attachment 742851
Flag Variant 1 (Officially State, but bottom variant used far more often) --Used mostly in Government Buildings

View attachment 742852
Civil Ensign (used far more often than the above flag) --Used everywhere, especially in Nationalist Rallies

(Just to be clear. This is a Japanese puppet state, part of the Greater East Asian Co-Prosperity Sphere, and part of my continuing series of redesigns of that organization. )
I quite like the second design, but I feel like the emblem is a bit busy. I would remove the gear and the centre dots, but enlarge the stars.
 
albania (1).png

Islamic Albania

This is Islamic Albania. I made this as a joke for a friend a few months back, but the more I look at it the less of a joke it becomes. Basically, the crescent and stars are an abstract form of the Albanian eagle--the crescent being the wings, the pentagram being the body, and the two stars being the two heads.
 
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t3erjZ4.png


My take on a flag of Bengal. This Bengal state is one that comes from a different partition of India. The Lily is the national symbol of Bengal, while the two water ripples represent the two wars fought for independence (Indian Independence Crisis, Hyderabad War). The Y shape symbolises the Padma river which splits into the Padma and Brahmaputra rivers.

Red represents hope and a new day, while green represents the land. Some say the red represents the Odisha, while the two green segments represent Assam and Bengal. The flag used during the early days of Bengal did not feature the lily, only the Red/White/Green Y in different proportions.

PuzTYXr.png


The Independence Flag (or "Resistance Flag") is still officially the War Ensign of Bengal, and is used at nationalist rallies or on state holidays. It is also often the version of the flag seen in drawings or graphics, since it is simpler to make.
 
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In the early 1990s, a group of Californian scientists, students, and counterculturalists journeyed deep into the searing Californian desert east of Los Angeles. For the past few years, an acrid, orange dust had drifted without fail into the Los Angeles area, creating breathing problems for a coastline renowned for it's healthy air. These same scientists had previously protested about this dust to every authority of California. The government was sympathetic about the dust, but could do nothing about the cause: the Salton Sea was drying up, exposing the orange-tinted saline lakebed the winds of the California desert.

The Salton Sea is an abberation of nature. Every few hundred years, the Colorado river changes it's course dramatically around the Salton Trough. Sometimes, it creates a massive lake, but when it flows around the Trough it creates a dry desert basin. In 1518, the river shifted towards a position that would create this basin, but humanity interfered--the rich alluvial farmland of the Colorado River was used to create farmland, and from the farmland came water runoff, which kept the vanishing lake on life support for many years. However, as farming technology advanced, runoff from commercial farms became smaller and smaller, reducing the size of the lake. By the 1990s, the lake became a literal toxic cesspool.

As a result, several academics, scientists and countercultural people banded together to protest the drying up of the Salton Sea, protesting in downtown LA. Even the farmers began to complain, demanding that California manage the situation. However, for some people, protesting was not enough. As both a stunt and a statement, some scientists journyed to the shores of the Salton Sea, organized a protest with local farmers and declared the area of Bombay Beach (an abandoned planned town) a sovereign, independent nation, the Republic of Salton. After a few days a tiny news crew showed up, and some of the farmers of the hamlet of Mundo, who were incensed by the lack of action on the part of the Californian government (even though the problem was technically their fault), contributed their land to the Republic.

This passion project created some news and more laughs, but it also achieved it's goal--to raise awareness in the United States of the dismal nature of the Salton Sea's ecosystem and the effects it had. Eventually, after a few days, most of the students and counterculturists returned to their homes, but some of the scientists stayed to do studies on the lake. One of them, educated in graphic design, created a flag for the Republic, inspired by a view across the lake. The blue represents the waters of Salton-- the white, the heat-mirage that stretches far into the distance over the Sea, and the mountain a representation of the peaks of the San Andreas fault, which the Salton Sea lies inside. The red, white, and blue colors reflect the Republican identity of the nation.

Even after the scientists had left, many of the farmers along the Western and Southern shores of the lake continued to use the flag as a symbol of Salton Sea identity. It is still used by many environmentalists around Southern California, and has gained a cult following as a protest flag. Though the original founders may be long gone, a few farmers in Mundo sell Saltonese merchandise to the odd tourist, many of whom are ignorant of the history of the area. The Republic of Salton joins the ranks of odd "Micronations" spread across the world.

Salton Republic.png
 
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coptic egypt.png

This is a proposed flag for a Coptic Egypt. The colours are drawn directly from the Coptic cross. The black stripe in the centre symbolizes the fertile Nile Valley, while the yellow on the left and right symbolize the desert on either side.
 
So, there was a post here that was different, but I decided it needed some more time in the cooking pot before I posted it fully. But I want to replace it with a flag that I made today for @durante. This is a new flag for an independent East Florida, one that gained it's independence far later from the British and thus adopted many elements from their flag. The flag combines the Bonny Blue Flag, the first flag of East Florida, and the Union jack. I added rays to evoke the sun, a common device in Florida state flag redesigns. All credit to durante, I would have never come up with the idea for an independent East Florida myself!

Kingdom of Florida.png
 
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Tried to combine two flags for the Low German language. The so called Noordlandflagg and the Sassenvlagg (From a discord server I am)
Low German flag.png
 
So, there was a post here that was different, but I decided it needed some more time in the cooking pot before I posted it fully. But I want to replace it with a flag that I made today for @durante. This is a new flag for an independent East Florida, one that gained it's independence far later from the British and thus adopted many elements from their flag. The flag combines the Bonny Blue Flag, the first flag of East Florida, and the Union jack. I added rays to evoke the sun, a common device in Florida state flag redesigns. All credit to durante, I would have never come up with the idea for an independent East Florida myself!

View attachment 743668
My first thought was communist Britain
 
Here is a flag of PUNCA (Partido Unidad Nacional de Centroamérica), an El Salvador-based right-wing ultranationalist organization/party that aims to unify the countries of El Salvador, Nicaragua, and Honduras. Founded after the Salvadorian civil war, the party adopted falangist elements and pledged to solve the problems of the Salvadorian people by creating a unified nation-state known as Patria. They claimed that the horrible poverty and constant strife experienced by the Salvadorians was caused by the lack of space for the people living inside the tiny country, and that the country's traditional position as the capital of both the Federation of Central America and the Greater Republic of Central America justified it's claims on Honduras and Nicaragua, which were core territories of both Fedrations.

Fortunately, no one wanted more armed conflicts after the civil war, and the party attracted few followers at first. But as the 21st century has gone on, the party has gained more traction with calls to depose the pro-United States Government. They have now started to blame everything on the United States (much like Venezuela, with which they have a good relationship with). Hueguerra Almhez Arada, the current party leader, has rapidly gained support by managing to decimate several local gangs within the San Salvador area using the armed wing of the party, the Erjécito Patria (EP), or the Army of the Homeland. The question yet remains: will the U.S. step in to prevent these radical right-wingers from taking control of El Salvador, or will they ignore the rapidly-developing party threatening another brutal war in Central America?

Partidad de Union Nacional de El Salvado.png


The flag of PUNCA is...strikingly similar to another flag of another extremist party. One could say that was intentional, though PUNCA claims to be totally disconnected with Nazi ideologies. The blue is that of El Salvador's flag, with a white sun symbolizing a new dawn for Latin America, and the angular symbol in the middle representing both the triangular emblems of Nicaragua and El Salvador's flag. It also is supposed to represent three stylized arms grasping each other, a symbol of the three-way national identity and unity of Patria. Of course, the flag has raised many objections from surrounding countries, and the United Nations has repeatedly condemned the use of this kind of imagery in PUNCAs flag.
 
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