Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes V (Do Not Post Current Politics Here)

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Inspired by @Oppo's and @claybaskit 's masterpiece, "The Torch That Refused to Die"

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Pls re-follow me @Oppo or I'll shitpost every wikibox in my computer.
 
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Welcome back to another episode of The Crossroads of Destiny: The Definitive Edition where I take you into an election game and tell you all about what happened, who happened, how it happened, all that, it should be normal... like... always...

*FLASH OF WHITE*

Hey, it's Crimson Rouge here and welcome back to my timeline about a surviving CSA! We're on the very last CSA election before the war happens, and I know you're all waiting for the war update, which I promise you will come within the next week! ^^

This election was held in a period of heightened national tension and jingoistic mood to "bash the damn Yankees once and for all" which benefited one party, the right-wing populist Firebreather Association, which had the silent endorsement of the incumbent President and a wave of national anger backing them. In the Firebreather convention, they ended up nominating Governor of Texas Efrem Zimbalist, who was the first Jew nominated for the presidency by a major party, continuing the "Multiracial Democracy" stance Confederate society, and particularly the Firebreathers, took where all races - white, Jewish, Hispanic, Asian, were perfectly fine people as long as they all agreed to kick the African-Confederate down. And Zimbalist was no different, he authorised further empowerment of the white and Hispanic dominated police so that they could further crack down on "gang" violence in the urban areas, which "success" earned him a landslide re-election in 1978 and catapulted him to the nomination. He chose to run with charismatic pastor Jack Stevenson who preached to his "People's Temple" all about how God made the blacks an inferior people and how war with the United States would save Confederate society from its "sins".

Opposing them is the Populist Party, a party originally rising from poor farmers and urban laborers, it has tended to be the most conciliatory to African-Confederates ever since the split that led to the "Green Hoods" faction leaving to join the Firebreathers. Its 1981 nominee, Governor of Puerto Rico Tadeo Jose Murillo, was no different. Known nationwide for his meeting with the NAACP's head Alexander Freeman-Smalls, he managed to get explicit support of civil rights in the party's platform and expressed his desire for a "new Confederacy for a new millennium". This led to some old-school Populists declaring that they would rather go for Zimbalist, but he rode that out and declared his running mate would be Senator Jack Daniels of Kentucky, ensuring that the Appalachian region would stick with the party and preventing a possible walk-out.

The incumbents, the Conservative Party, was in a tough spot. Their president pressured them to nominate someone on the right-wing, someone who carried on his right-wing platform, and was dismayed when the convention decided to go the opposite path, nominate someone on the left of the party, Congressman David Steel of Virginia. Steel was a firm conservative on fiscal matters, but he had considerably liberal views on race. Old-school Conservatives declared that they would much prefer Zimbalist to a "black-lover", and the party had a walk-out as many Deep South delegates walked out and endorsed Zimbalist, declaring that he was very much "the Conservative option" instead of the "liberal" Steel. Fortunately for Steel, he could count on the support of the Wright twins which controlled the Alabama party and had enough influence to prevent him from being removed from the ballots outright in other states. Perhaps as gratitude, he announced that his running mate would be Senator Penny Wright, ensuring that the establishment of the establishment party would stick with him.

The one thing both Steel and Murillo took comfort in, was the fact the electoral arithmetic did not favour the Firebreathers. The "core Confederacy" was decreasing in electoral votes and the party was overall not particularly popular outside it. The campaign was fierce as Zimbalist ran on "protecting our virtue" and "ending the Yankee menace", the most militaristic a Firebreather was for decades, while both Steel and Murillo aimed their campaigns solidly at Zimbalist, declaring him a "dangerous man" who would ruin the Confederacy and lead them to an unwinnable war with the United States. Both Murillo and Steel pleaded for people to see sense and vote for someone who knew better than Zimbalist.

But it was all in vain. The Confederate people were angry and they wanted revenge on the Yankees. A big chunk of them also declared that they voted Zimbalist because he was the only one who did not support rights for African-Confederates. The electoral college was the only thing that stopped Zimbalist from victory, but after recounts in both Tennessee and Georgia went his way, Efrem Zimbalist was declared the 21st President of the Confederate States of America, and the path to war and to disaster began.
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Okay, so this is a sort of "through a glass darkly" thing where it's a timeline in a timeline, that of a CSA victory timeline in Crossroads of Destiny. Yes, David Steel is American from Virginia here, don't ask me how or why
 
The first time you show one of my character winning an election is with Buckley :coldsweat:
I do find it rather interesting that we managed to make the two sides of the Second American Civil War being led by people who were born with different names and got new ones later in life

Who would recognise the names of Elizabeth Wilson or Efrem Zimbalist? Almost no one, I would say.

But the names of Arya Moon and Jim Buckley? Now you're talking a lot of people
 
As Pauline Marois entered her second year as Quebec's premier, her government began to become quite unpopular with the Liberals under newly minted leader Philippe Couillard having a commanding lead in the opinion polls. Despite this she still was going strong and was able to keep her job after several prominent PQ MNAs trying to depose her as leader to which she was dubbed as "Dame de béton." Ultimately, with the PQ likely to face certain defeat and growing discontent in her own government, Marois made her decision "independently" and resigned the premiership and her seat of Charlevoix–Côte-de-Beaupré.

Numerous PQ cabinet ministers were rumoured to be launching their bids including François Gendron and Léo-Bureau-Blouin. Though someone that entered the race soon began the unstoppable rise of the Parti Québécois to glory days of the 90s. This man would come out of nowhere from the US and with knowing little French, led the PQ to an 81 seat victory and bringing on a tide of Quebec nationalism not seen since the '95 referendum. This man would be known as the “Sauveur de la souveraineté.”

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Clark Joseph Kent (born June 18, 1916; disappeared February 19, 1965) was an American journalist employed by the New York Inquirer. Kent had a reputation of being the Inquirer's best reporter of the "Super beat", with detailed articles about any "monster of the week" that would attack New York, or other nearby cities. His 1963 interview of Superman, who had been in hiding since the Colonization Fleet incident, earned him a McDuck Award for Excellence in Journalism

On February 19, 1965, Kent left New York City to cover a special congressional election in Ilium. However, he went missing; his car was last seen driving through the New York City suburb of Riverdale. Many supervillains have claimed to have been responsible for Kent's disappearance, but none presented any evidence.

Late in her life, his widow Lois Lane claimed that Kent was the secret identity of Superman, and that he faked his death. This claim is believed to have been a delusion brought on by dementia.

This article about a United States journalist born in the 1910s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
 
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As Pauline Marois entered her second year as Quebec's premier, her government began to become quite unpopular with the Liberals under newly minted leader Philippe Couillard having a commanding lead in the opinion polls. Despite this she still was going strong and was able to keep her job after several prominent PQ MNAs trying to depose her as leader to which she was dubbed as "Dame de béton." Ultimately, with the PQ likely to face certain defeat and growing discontent in her own government, Marois made her decision "independently" and resigned the premiership and her seat of Charlevoix–Côte-de-Beaupré.

Numerous PQ cabinet ministers were rumoured to be launching their bids including François Gendron and Léo-Bureau-Blouin. Though someone that entered the race soon began the unstoppable rise of the Parti Québécois to glory days of the 90s. This man would come out of nowhere from the US and with knowing little French, led the PQ to an 81 seat victory and bringing on a tide of Quebec nationalism not seen since the '95 referendum. This man would be known as the “Sauveur de la souveraineté.”

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"Manifester, s'il vous plaît."
 
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Clark Joseph Kent (born June 18, 1916; disappeared February 19, 1965) was an American journalist employed by the New York Inquirer. Kent had a reputation of being the Inquirer's best reporter of the "Super beat", with detailed articles about any "monster of the week" that would attack New York, or other nearby cities. His 1963 interview of Superman, who had been in hiding since the Colonization Fleet incident, earned him a McDuck Award for Excellence in Journalism

On February 19, 1965, Kent left New York City to cover a special congressional election in Ilium. However, he went missing; his car was last seen driving through the New York City suburb of Riverdale. Many supervillains have claimed to have been responsible for Kent's disappearance, but none presented any evidence.

Late in her life, his widow Lois Lane claimed that Kent was the secret identity of Superman, and that he faked his death. This claim is believed to have been a delusion brought on by dementia.

This article about a United States journalist born in the 1910s is a stub. You can help Wikipedia by expanding it.
This feels like it's from one of the FISOT games, but I'm not sure which one.
 
"Lá, lá, lá, lá, lá, Brizola!"
A very Brazilian one-shot scene

1989 was a very chaotic year in Brazil. For the first time in almost three decades, Brazilian people would elect his new chief of state and government in free and democratic elections. Despite the first free elections to Governorships and the Federal Chamber already happened from 1982 and beyond, this time was special. So, the presidential race finally began by March, when governors Álvaro Dias of Paraná and Orestes Quércia of São Paulo challenged the then-presumptive nominee from PMDB, the legendary Ulysses Guimarães (federal deputy from São Paulo and Speaker of the House before February 1989). President José Sarney quickly stated his neutrality, trying to keep his very poor (or beyond this) legacy on his economic plans and so on, far from the candidates. In April, former governor Leonel Brizola of Rio de Janeiro announced his intention to run for presidency, as well the rising star of new National Renewal Party (PRN), Fernando Collor de Mello from the poor nordestino state of Alagoas. The first polls included former President Jânio Quadros (PTB), former federal deputy Paulo Maluf (PDS) and the businessman and TV presenter Sílvio Santos (PMB), the last impugnated by Electoral Court (TSE), in June after a scandal on his party's signatures and filiations blew-up. By July's begin, Maluf and Quadros withdrawal from the race, and both parties declined to endorse any presidential contenders.

By the official period of campaign reached, Lula was officialized the candidate of Popular Brazil Front, picking the PSB's general-secretary Roberto Amaral as his running mate, and after months of speculation, Darcy Ribeiro (registered in Minas Gerais) has been choosed by Leonel Brizola over Fernando Lyra's name. The leader on polls, Itamar Franco, then Senator from Minas Gerais, was picked by Collor. After PMDB chaotic convention, Álvaro Dias get the nomination barely defeating Guimarães, picking his loyal allied Íris Rezende, former Governor of Goiás as his running mate. So, the race has been polarized by Collor, Brizola, Lula, Covas and Dias, with the last four fighting for one place to go for the second round against the clear favorite Fernando Collor, which was in high-30s on polls. But there came the debates... Collor gone to the debates and discussed in warm voice against Brizola, Lula and Dias. Covas passed a weighted image, as well tried Ronaldo Caiado (PSD) of Goiás and Guilherme Afif (PL) of São Paulo, which in the end wouldn't reach 5% of total vote. As the election day nearly to arrive, Brizola and Lula were tied in second position, and Minas Gerais would prove once more which would be decisive on the process. With the last votes coming to be counted in 21 November 1989, Leonel Brizola and Fernando Collor were officially confirmed as the second round participants.

The first second round of Brazilian presidential elections would be historical. Not only by this specific mark but by the way that would end. And Collor trailed Brizola on first polls by 64-36%, or even 61-39% winning every state but Rio Grande do Sul, Rio de Janeiro and the Federal District. But things come fall (literally) to Fernando Collor. The first step was in the famous Comício do 2/12 in Rio de Janeiro, with a crowd of more than 200,000 people rallying for Brizola, with support of first round defeated candidates Lula, Covas and Álvaro Dias. So, Brizola rose big, getting closer the gap with the alagoano. So, the final debate, hold by TV networks Globo, SBT, Bandeirantes and Manchete in a unic "pool" of networks registered almost 100% of tunned televisions across the country, after 1.5-2 hours of questions and answers to both candidates, Collor fell to the studio floor, raising questions about your health, despite being 39-years-old. He wasn't more able to do more campaign until the voting day (by medical orders), which gave an improbable boost to the gaucho-carioca "caudillo". After a exit poll showing a 51-49% advantage to Collor, in 21 December 1989, which a few more than 35 million votes, Leonel de Moura Brizola was proclaimed the 32nd President of Brazil. The center-left (and left too) finally return to power for the first time since 1964's coup d'état against the President-elect brother-in-law, João Goulart.


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