TL-191 Uniform, weapons and equipment of the Secondary Combatants.

Perhaps it would be based off another chassis then? Like a Skoda or Christie?
This is one of those occasions where some hand-waving of real history must by necessity take effect. the Vickers 6-ton was one of the most influential pre-war tank designs, sold worldwide and with at least 4 major belligerents basing tank designs directly on it (The USSR with the T-26, Italy with their M13/40, Hungary with the Turan, and China outright using the Vickers as did a number of other smaller players such as Thailand.)

In this circumstance, with the UK banned from Fielding Tanks, you could hand-wave it as an inverse of Germany using Dutch and Swedish companies to develop Artillery and U-boats between the wars, maybe working with Japan to design modern machines ala the Germans and Soviets working together.
 
This is one of those occasions where some hand-waving of real history must by necessity take effect. the Vickers 6-ton was one of the most influential pre-war tank designs, sold worldwide and with at least 4 major belligerents basing tank designs directly on it (The USSR with the T-26, Italy with their M13/40, Hungary with the Turan, and China outright using the Vickers as did a number of other smaller players such as Thailand.)

In this circumstance, with the UK banned from Fielding Tanks, you could hand-wave it as an inverse of Germany using Dutch and Swedish companies to develop Artillery and U-boats between the wars, maybe working with Japan to design modern machines ala the Germans and Soviets working together.
So what you are saying, the British might develop a clandestine tank program and would have their designs be constructed by a 3rd Party manufacturer outside of Britain, and in turn, be built and sold for other armies (both big and small).

Edit: Another thing, the Rearming Entente Armies would cleverly designate their weapons as a form of Plausible Deniability as the German Reichswehr did with their new weapons on OTL (such as the MG-13 and sFH 18), which they would claim these new guns were in fact designed during the Great War.
 
So what you are saying, the British might develop a clandestine tank program and would have their designs be constructed by a 3rd Party manufacturer outside of Britain, and in turn, be built and sold for other armies (both big and small).
that's about the size of it. While i doubt the Vickers design specifically would be built, you could make use of some other British tank concepts from the interwar years.
 
German Small Arms of GW2


Gewehr-98k (or internationally as the Standard-Modell), mainly used by the German Army, Police, Navy, and Air Force, also being widely exported, notably to the Ukraine, Baltic Duchy, White Ruthenia, China, Bolivia, and so forth.

Karabiner 98k, main German service rifle, same as OTL, execpt being adopted earlier (like in 1924 or 1926)

Gewehr 41, planned replacement for the K98, but was mainly issued to Elite German Troops such as Alpenjager and Panzergrenadiers.

Bergmann MP-32 SMG, also used by Holland, Austria-Hungary, Poland, Baltic Duchy, and the Ukraine.

Erma MP-34, also used by Persia, Bulgaria, Turkey, Austria-Hungary, White Ruthenia, Poland, China, and Spain.

Erma MP-37, originally intended for use by tank crews and paratroopers.

MG-34 (because I think Germany will still get these regardless), also used by Austria-Hungary, Norway, the Ukraine, Poland, Baltic Duchy, Bulgaria, Turkey, and captured weapons by the Russians, British, and French.

MG-29 (OTL MG 13), limited use with the German Army during the GW2, also used by many other nations such as China, Baltic Duchy, Portugal, Uruguay, and Peru.

Luger P08, Standard German Service pistol from 1908, also used by many other nations.

Walther P38
 
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French Military weapons (GW1 and GW2)


MAS 37 (Developed to replace the aging Ruby sidearm)

Ruby 1904 Pistol

Mle 1892 Revolver (Used as a service pistol during the Great War, but limited use in the Second War, mainly with the Police, Security Forces, Navy, and Actionist Paramilitary)

Lebel Mle 1886 M93 Bolt Action (Main French service rifle during the Great War, as with the Mle 1892 Revolver, saw limited use in the 2nd Great War, mostly by Rear Area troops, Actionist Paramiliary troops, and with Colonial Troops.

Berthier Rifle series (Mle 1892 and 1916 Carbines, Mle 1907/15 and 1907/16 Rifles), (Originally a support rifle, during the Great War, it was pressed into service as an Infantry Rifle, also used alongside the MAS 36 in the 2nd Great War)

MAS 36 (Primary Service rifle during the Second Great War)

MAS 42 (Limited service during the Second Great War)

Meunier Mle. 1916 (Limited Use during the Great War, used by the French Navy and Actionist Paramilitary Units during the 2nd Great War)

MAS 38

MAH-43 (A simple to manufacture SMG introduced into French Army service in April of 1943.

Hotchkiss Model 1914 (Standard Heavy Machine Gun for France during both the 1st and 2nd Great Wars)

MAC-1936 (Standard French Light Machine Gun during the Second Great War)

Hotchkiss Mle. 1917 (Developed in 1922, exported to many nations such as Persia, Greece, Spain, Brazil, Mexico, and even to the Confederacy (4,500 purchased for the CSN in 1931), during the Second Great War, used mainly by Colonial Troops, Actionist Paramilitary Units, Security Units, and as a Training MG)

Hotchkiss Mle 1909 (First French LMG, used by France during the Great War, but was used by Secondary and Colonial Units during the 2nd War, also used by the armies of Turkey, Siam, the Confederacy (also licensed made as the Griswold M1914), Britain, Quebecois (using ex-Canadian Army guns), and China.

Chauchat Mle 1915 (Saw extensive use by France during the First Great War, but mostly out of service by the 2nd Great War. Regarded as History's Worst Machine-Gun)

St. Etienne Mle 1907 (Used in the early days of the 1st Great War, eventually phased out by the Hotchkiss 1914 from French Service by 1934)
 
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Now for some Ottoman Small Arms


Mauser Model 1938 Long Rifle

and Carbine

The various modernized models such as the 1903/38 (pictured here), 1893/34, 1890/29, and even German 1898 rifles and carbines would be modernized.

Additionally, Turkey would import foreign built rifles such as the M. 1922, Gewehr-98k, and Karabiner-98k rifles.


MP-28, a German designed SMG adopted by the Turkish Army in 1931. The weapon and it's predecessor the MP-18 would be employed by the armies of Poland, Ukraine, Baltic Duchy, Bulgaria, Persia, China, Brazil, Venezuela, Peru, Sweden, Norway, Holland, Paraguay, and Costa Rica, in German service, it was limited to police and naval service.

The Ottoman Empire would also for it's submachine-guns the MP-34, MP-37, and KP/31.

For the Machine-Guns and LMGs, Turkey would use the MG. 1926 and MG-34 along side with the MG-08 and these guns

M-1932 LMG, a locally made derivative of the Browning BAR rifle in 7.92x57mm

Colt MG14, the export version of the Browning M1912 Heavy Machine Gun.

Now for something totally different.


The Solothurn S18-100 Heavy Barrel Busting Rifle, a Swiss designed and manufactured gun using the 20mm ammunition and the best rifle the Barrel Busting category of rifles. Used in numbers by Germany, Austria-Hungary, Turkey, Poland, Bulgaria, the Ukraine, Finland, Holland, Italy, Persia, and even small numbers being sold to both the USA and the CSA for evaluation and field testing.
 
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Now for something Different


Various Paint Schemes of the Focke Wulf 190 Fighter.

1. Fw-190 A-1 of Jagdgeschwader 11 "Von Richthofen" based in Berlin, circa October of 1940. Jg 11 was to be first squadron to field this new fighter.

2. Fw-190 A-3 belonging to the 2nd Bohemian Fighter Squadron of the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force based at Żółkiewka, Poland, circa August of 1941. This particular aircraft was the personal mount of fighter ace Josef František, the 5th highest scoring ace of the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force during the 2nd Great War.

3. Fw-190 A-4 "Green 7" from Jg 20 based somewhere in East Prussia, circa November of 1941.

4. Fw-190 A-6 belonging to the 10th Pursuit Squadron of the Polish Air Force based near Warsaw, circa June of 1942. During the GW2, the Polish Air Force would operate 674 Fw-190s and 221 Avia B. 75 fighters and would continue to do so until 1954 when they were retired.

5. Fw-190 A-6/R-11 Nighter Fighter belonging to the NachtJagdgeschwader 31 based at Stuttgart, circa Autumn of 1942, note that there are 4 bulls eyes indicating that four British bombers were shot down by the pilot.

6. Fw-190 A-7 of Jg 27 from Marburg Airfield, circa March of 1943. Note that this aircraft has rockets mounted underneath it's wings for attacking enemy barrels.

7. Avia B. 75 (a licensed copy) of the 6th Hungarian Attack Squadron in the Ukraine, circa Summer of 1943. In July of 1942, the Avia Company was given the technical documents and machinery to manufacture the Focke Wulf fighter and during the war would manufacture about 9,000 fighters.

8. Fw-190 A-8 of Jg 55 "Perkūnas" Squadron based near Koknese Courland, circa December of 1943. The Perkūnas Squadron was a German fighter unit who was made mostly of ethnic Latvians, note the Swastika on the tail (a symbol of the Baltic God of Thunder) was the emblem of this squadron. Following war's end, the squadron and their aircraft would be transferred to the Baltic Air Corps, in which these 190s would serve that nation until 1956 when they were retired.

9. Fw-190 A-8/R-8 from the Turkish 22nd Fighter Squadron based in Armenia, circa January of 1944. During the war, the Ottoman Empire was receive 900 Fw-190s, 722 Avia B. 75, and even producing 360 aircraft under license. The Ottoman Empire would operate this type until 1958 when they were withdrawn from service due to their age.

10. Fw-190 F-8 of SturmJagdgeschwader 52 based in Northern Belgium, circa April of 1944.

11. Fw-190 D-9 from Jg 40 in Western Russia, June of 1944.

12. Ta-152 A-0 pre-production airframe near Magdeburg, circa Spring of 1944. The Ta-152 project was launched after German Intelligence learning about the British developing the high altitude Avro Lincoln bomber in the July of 1943 in order to counter the new potential threat. Kurt Tank and his team would modify the Fw-190 to fly at higher altitudes by giving it the new Junkers Jumo 213E engine and to modify the wings, tail, and fuselage of the aircraft. In February of 1944, the British would terminate the Lincoln project, which would lead to the Ta-152 project going to the back burner and eventually would itself be terminated in June of 1944 after the cessation of hostilities. Only Six prototypes and 22 pre-production aircraft would be produced. This particular airplane shown here is now preserved at the
Deutsche Luftfahrt-Sammlung Museum in Berlin.

(Edit: Brief History, in the late 1930s, the Reichs Air Ministry would order a new fighter that was to serve in an offensive capability and the ultimate design chosen came from Focke Wulf. The Focke Wulf fighter during the GW2 would prove to one of the most versatile aircraft in the Central Power's inventory serving in many roles including being a fighter, fighter-bomber, night fighter, ground-attack, and even a recon aircraft. Aside from the Imperial German Air Force, it would also serve in the air forces of Austria-Hungary, the Baltic Duchy, Poland, Ottoman Empire, White Ruthenia, Bulgaria, Finland, Norway, Holland, Italy, Sweden, Denmark, Ireland, China, Romania, the Ukraine, Persia, and even the Russians pressed some captured airframes into service as well as two airframes being sold to the Union for evaluation. The aircraft would serve on for a few years after the GW2 in those air forces, and the last airframe would be retired in 1968 from the Bulgarian Air Force. In all, the Germans would built 38,844 airframes from 1940 to 1947 with an additional 9,000 built under license by Avia from 1942 to 1945 and 360 by the Turkish Izmanu Company, making it one of the most numerous fighters of the Central Powers during the war. The fighter would be well liked by the Central Powers pilots who flew them and feared by the Radius Alliance pilots who fought them, so much so, the British would call the aircraft the "Butcher Bird." Most aviation and military historians would consider this type to be the Best German fighter of the conflict, and some even argued it to the best of the piston engine fighter of the war.
 
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Now for some Austro-Hungarian Aircraft of the GW2.

Curtiss-Lohner Modell 75.png

A Curtiss-Lohner Modell 75 of the 4th Croatian Pursuit Squadron, originally based at Rijeka, but was transferred to Galicia after the outbreak of war in June of 1941. Depicted here is an aircraft that was the personal mount of Franjo Dzal, who was the first Croatian Fighter Ace of the war, credited with shooting down 13 Russian aircraft being himself being shot down and killed on September 11th, 1941 over Galicia. The Curtiss-Lohner Modell 75 was a licensed copy of the American Curtiss Model 75 fighter that was produced by Lohner-Werke in Vienna. The Aircraft was armed with six 7.92mm Schwarzlose M. 1934 aircraft machine-guns. By the outbreak of war, only 108 aircraft were in the inventory of the Austro-Hungarians, equipping three squadrons (two in the Balkans and one based in Austria) and were all rushed to the Galicia to bolster the Austro-Hungarian units in the region. During the war, a further 63 aircraft would be produced and the type would be withdrawn from service in 1943 due to more advanced aircraft entering service (such as the Lohner LW. 175, which was essentially an upgraded M. 75.)

Lohner Werke LW. 70.png

One of 52 Lohner Werke LW. 70F-1 light bombers of the Finnish Air Force in Karelia, circa March of 1944. In 1937, the Austro-Hungarian Air Ministry would place and order for a new monoplane light bomber, which companies like Letov, Ikarus, Lohner, and Avia would develop prototypes and the winner of this contract would fall to Lohner-Werke with it's LW. 70. The LW. 70 was a fast and handy twin engine light bomber that had the capability to carry 2,000 lbs or 907 kg of ordnance and also had 4 Schwarzlose machine-guns in the wings and two in a dorsal turret. The type would enter service with the Austro-Hungarian K.u.K. Army Air Force in 1940, and examples would also be exported to the (36) Netherlands, (4) Switzerland, (104) Ottoman Empire, (20) Poland, (64) the Ukraine, (40) Sweden, and (52) Finland. During the Second Great War, the type would be used as light bomber, reconnaissance, army cooperation, training, and target tug and was replaced from frontline duties in the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force in April of 1943 by the German built Junkers Ju-88 bomber.

avia-b135.png

An Avia B. 135 C-2 Fighter belonging to the 5th Austrian Fighter Squadron based in Lemberg in May of 1942. The B. 135 fighter was essentially a redesigned B. 35 that was of all metal construction and featured a retractable landing gear. The type would enter service in late 1939 at first not with the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force, but with the Bulgarian Air Force with 50 machines. The Austro-Hungarians would however have their first 75 machines delivered in the Spring of 1940 which was followed by an order for 120 more of the type. Other pre-war users of the B. 135 would be the air forces of the Ukraine, Poland, Greece, Ottoman Empire, White Ruthenia, and Norway, in addition, Persia and Finland would both order aircraft from Avia, but their orders would be taken by the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force upon the outbreak of war. Shortly after the start of the war, the B. 135 would be upgraded with a more powerful engine and two MK. 1941 cannons (a licensed copy of the MG 151/20) were added to the airplane to increase it's performance. During the war, 2,877 aircraft would be produced by Avia with production ending in the Summer of 1943 in favor of the Avia B. 199 (a licensed copy of the Fokker D. 109 fighter). Interestingly, the competitor to the Avia B. 199 was the B. 135 F-0 Model, which had a new Junkers Jumo engine and had two MG. 1942 13mm machine-guns and five MK. 1941 cannons.

b35.gif

One of 40 Avia B. 35 fighters that was sold to the Ukraine in October of 1939, depicted here is one that was stationed in Kiev in June of 1940. In the mid 1930s, the Austro-Hungarian Air Ministry would make a request for a new fighter that was to be a monoplane, and so Avia would begin work on the B. 35 project, which would first prototype would be first flown in May of 1938 and shortly thereafter would enter service with the Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force. The type would also be exported to the Poland (25 machines), Bulgaria (40 machines), the Ukraine (40 machines), and White Ruthenia (15 machines). By June of 1941, the Austro-Hungarians would have 216 of these aircraft in their inventory when war broke out, making it their most numerous fighter at the time. When faced by the contemporary Russian I-16 and Yak-1 fighters, it was outclassed in every category from top speed to armament (the B. 35 was armed with only two 7.92mm Schwarzlose Machine-Guns.) By the Spring of 1942, surviving aircraft were withdrawn from frontline service and were used in secondary roles such as glider and target tugs, which they served in that capacity until 1946 when they were finally retired.

Avia B. 534.png

An Avia B. 534 from the 2nd Slovak Pursuit Squadron, stationed near Pressburg, circa November of 1938. First developed in the early 1930s, the Avia B. 534 fighter was a capable bi-plane fighter and was advanced for it's time for the fact that it had an enclosed canopy. The Austro-Hungarian Army Air Force would operate a total of 310 of this aircraft from 1935 to late 1941, other operators would include Poland, Bulgaria, the Ukraine, Persia, White Ruthenia, China, and even the Imperial German Luftwaffe would operate 45 aircraft for it'd Mittelafrika provinces. During the early stages of the GW2, the this aircraft would make up 34% of the Austro-Hungary's fighter strength, thus they had to contend with more advanced Russian fighters. Fortunately, the fighter was withdrawn by the end of 1941 for good, instead being used in secondary roles such as fighter-trainers, glider and target tugs, which they would fill those capacities until 1944 when they were retired after 9 years of service.
 
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Some more Aircraft of the Luftwaffe

Fokker D. 109.png

In December of 1939, the Fokker Company would begin development of a new fighter for both the German Kaiserliche Luftwaffe and the Dutch Army Air Corps with Willy Messerschmitt as the chief designer of the project. The first prototype, the D. 109 V-1 would be completed in March of 1941 and would be first flown on June 6th, 1941 at the Schipol Aerodrome in Amsterdam. During the British Invasion of the country in June of 1941, the prototype along with it's design team and technical information were evacuated to Germany where development continued. The Aircraft would eventually enter service with the Luftwaffe in November of 1942 and see it's first combat action on the Western Front against the RAF over the Rhine. During the course of the war. 14,532 D. 109s would be constructed and would serve with the air forces of Poland, Switzerland, the Ukraine, the Dutch Army Air Corps in exile, Bulgaria, Finland, and would also enter service various other air forces after the war such as with the Baltic Duchy, Norway, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, White Ruthenia, China, and Brazil. Depicted here is a D. 109 C-14 that was the personal mount of German ace Gunther Rall on the Eastern Front in Spring of 1944, which this very airframe is now preserved at the Prussian War Museum in Konigsberg.
Avia B. 199.png

In July of 1943, the Fokker company would provide technical data to the Bohemia based Avia Company for licensed production, in which from August of 1943 to September of 1944, would manufacture 5,465 of the Avia B. 199 fighter. This type would go on to serve with the Air Forces of Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Ottoman Empire, and Romania. Here is an aircraft from the 4th Czech Fighter Squadron based in Crimea, circa October of 1943.

Now here are some Ju-22 fighters made by @cortz#9 in my liveries
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A Ju-22 D-4 from Jg 18 on the Eastern Front, circa September of 1941. Note the faint German Flag on the tail, after August 28th, 1941, all aircraft had their National Colors painted over.
Ju-22_1.png

A Ju-22 D-3 from Jg 24 based near Dusseldorf, circa June of 1941, and this aircraft was the personal mount of the ace Werner Molders, who was shot down by a French D. 520 fighter over the Rhine in December of 1941.
Ju-22_2.png

A Ju-22 E-3 from Jg-25 stationed at Templehof Airfield in Berlin, circa November of 1942.

Ju-88 A14.png

The Junkers Ju-88 "Schnellbomber" first flew in December of 1936, the intention for the aircraft was that it was to be too fast for fighters of the time to intercept. The plane would eventually enter service with the Luftwaffe in 1939 due to technical problems with the new airplane, but by 1941, we all sorted out. During the GW2, the plane would prove to be a very versatile aircraft, filling the roles of bomber, dive bomber, torpedo bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, and also serving a night fighter and heavy fighter. During the war, the type would serve with the Polish, Austro-Hungarian, Bulgarian, Ottoman, Danish, Finnish, and Ukrainian Air Forces alongside with the Luftwaffe along with the Dutch Army Air Corps in Exile with a total of 15,148 aircraft being produced by Junkers, Fokker, and under license by Lohner-Werke in Austria. Depicted here is a Ju-88 A-14 from Kampfgeschwader 22 that served on the Western Front from it's base near Wurzburg, circa September of 1943.
 
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Some more Aircraft of the Luftwaffe

View attachment 512850
In December of 1939, the Fokker Company would begin development of a new fighter for both the German Kaiserliche Luftwaffe and the Dutch Army Air Corps with Willy Messerschmitt as the chief designer of the project. The first prototype, the D. 109 V-1 would be completed in March of 1941 and would be first flown on June 6th, 1941 at the Schipol Aerodrome in Amsterdam. During the British Invasion of the country in June of 1941, the prototype along with it's design team and technical information were evacuated to Germany where development continued. The Aircraft would eventually enter service with the Luftwaffe in November of 1942 and see it's first combat action on the Western Front against the RAF over the Rhine. During the course of the war. 14,532 D. 109s would be constructed and would serve with the air forces of Poland, Switzerland, the Ukraine, the Dutch Army Air Corps in exile, Bulgaria, Finland, and would also enter service various other air forces after the war such as with the Baltic Duchy, Norway, Denmark, Ireland, Italy, China, and Brazil. Depicted here is a D. 109 C-14 that was the personal mount of German ace Gunther Rall on the Eastern Front in Spring of 1944, which this very airframe is now preserved at the Prussian War Museum in Konigsberg.
View attachment 512849
In July of 1943, the Fokker company would provide technical data to the Bohemia based Avia Company for licensed production, in which from August of 1943 to September of 1944, would manufacture 5,465 of the Avia B. 199 fighter. This type would go on to serve with the Air Forces of Austria-Hungary, Bulgaria, Italy, and Romania. Here is an aircraft from the 4th Czech Fighter Squadron based in Crimea, circa October of 1943.

Now here are some Ju-22 fighters made by @cortz#9 in my liveries
View attachment 512851
A Ju-22 D-4 from Jg 18 on the Eastern Front, circa September of 1941. Note the faint German Flag on the tail, after August 28th, 1941, all aircraft had their National Colors painted over.
View attachment 512852
A Ju-22 D-3 from Jg 24 based near Dusseldorf, circa June of 1941, and this aircraft was the personal mount of the ace Werner Molders, who was shot down by a French D. 520 fighter over the Rhine in December of 1941.
View attachment 512853
A Ju-22 E-3 from Jg-25 stationed at Templehof Airfield in Berlin, circa November of 1942.

View attachment 512854
The Junkers Ju-88 "Schnellbomber" first flew in December of 1936, the intention for the aircraft was that it was to be too fast for fighters of the time to intercept. The plane would eventually enter service with the Luftwaffe in 1939 due to technical problems with the new airplane, but by 1941, we all sorted out. During the GW2, the plane would prove to be a very versatile aircraft, filling the roles of bomber, dive bomber, torpedo bomber, reconnaissance aircraft, and also serving a night fighter and heavy fighter. During the war, the type would serve with the Polish, Austro-Hungarian, Bulgarian, Ottoman, Danish, Finnish, and Ukrainian Air Forces alongside with the Luftwaffe along with the Dutch Army Air Corps in Exile with a total of 15,148 aircraft being produced by Junkers, Fokker, and under license by Lohner-Werke in Austria. Depicted here is a Ju-88 A-14 from Kampfgeschwader 22 that served on the Western Front from it's base near Wurzburg, circa September of 1943.
Very cool. :cool:
I particularly like the mount of Mölders, sorry to hear he was shot down.
 
Now for a couple of Russian Warplanes

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A Yakovlev Yak-9 from the 2nd Fighter Squadron, Karelian Front, circa November of 1943.
Lavochkin_La-5FN.png

A Lavochkin La-5FN from the 22nd Fighter Squadron, Ukrainian Front, circa March of 1944.
 
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