TL-191 Uniform, weapons and equipment of the Secondary Combatants.

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by pattontank12, Jan 22, 2019.

  1. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    1918 Quebecois Army officer test firing the Huot Automatic Rifle. Developed by legendary Quebecois weapons engineer Joseph Huot for the Canadian Army during the First Great the HAR was intended as a force multiplier for Canadian troops, facing off against the numerically superior Union Army. Using a conversion of the Ross Rifle that had been recently taken out of service before the First Great War for conversion into a light machine gun, since there was an at the time a sizable surplus of the weapon.

    It was quickly rushed into service during the final days of the War, proving popular amongst Canadian troops and a nightmare for their Union foes, though not enough to prevent the inevitable. Post war the Rifle was adopted as the standard issue Light Machine Gun of the Quebecois military, where it would once again see service during the Second Great War.
     
  2. Undeadmuffin Muffin want to liiiive !

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    Would Quebec be able to produce something like the Mosquito be for bombing, transport and/or supply ?

    I imagined that in the middle of the Canadian rebellion, with their units scattered and/or cut from supply, the Quebec army might try to devlop a cheap and fast transport plane to supply and support its occupation troops.
     
  3. Undeadmuffin Muffin want to liiiive !

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    Harfang QC-2

    QcPlane.png

    The old Canada Car and Foundry of Montreal was bought by the Quebec state after the independance and was tasked to create a long-range plane for transport and exploitation of the northern region of the Republic, still not linked by road. Unable to make a viable project, unable to hit the target demanded, the company finnaly approached the US air company Douglas.

    Douglas had made a prototype for a bi-motor, the DC-1, but had been forced to abandon it after Boeing launched the Boeing 250, superior in every point to the DC-1 prototype, making instead the very successful DL-2 Vega. Quebecair (the new name of the Canada Car and Foundry) bought the prototype and worked from it. Despite the plan of motorization with the new Lockheed R-1400, the war and recquisition of Lockheed factory for war production forced an emergency plan. They bought liscence right for an older engine, the Cyclone Gr-F01 and made a lighter version with modern materials.

    The culmination was the Harfang QC-2 (the QC-1 was the prototype with R-1400 engine). It came just in time for the Canadian revolt and the supply problems that the Quebec troops faced. Newly built ''Harfang'' were ''loaned'' to the occupation forces in Canada but piloted by Quebecois pilots. Made in wood, with light engines and often modified with skies, the cheap plane had a great range of 1700 km (1058 miles)

    Unsung for years since it didn't carried any weapons nor made any bombing mission, the wounded soldiers and those left stranded without supply were glad each time they heared the caracteristic humming of its engine and greatly welcomed the sight of the Harfang.
     
    Last edited: Jun 10, 2019
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