The Twin Vipers: A TL of the Berlin-Moscow Axis

Very interesting and perhaps my use of the word "slower" was incorrect, what I really meant is that the focus of tank development might take a different (alternate) direction ITTL than our own but things would straighten out a little later due to the changing picture of warfare in the post-WWII era.
I'm really curious to see what happened to Germany in the post war years and a German influenced Russia would be very interesting as well, the image of soldiers in WWII era German combat uniforms with post WWII Soviet weapons is an interesting one.
I would say both armies look mostly distinctive still. Just maybe some Ushankas in Wehrmacht use, a soviet MG42 clone is probably their leading light machine gun, probably camo smocks in red army and NKVD use that are influenced by Wehrmacht/SS designs. The Soviet helmets will probably follow the direction to the SSh36, as in continuing influence from the German stahlhelm, since nazis rampaging through all of their west not happening would prevent such a design from becoming taboo.
I mean Finnish, Chinese retained their traditions yet took a lot of German influence. Yet do to the massive industrial might and long established military tradition of Russia, shit like Ushankas, PPsh 41s will end up in the Wehrmacht stocks. After all, the Germans in this timeline where shown to have used soviet multiple rocket launchers against allied armies if I recall correctly.
Actually a good analogue for Soviet forces in this timeline, they will probably look somewhat like the Bulgarian army. Why? Bulgarian army was heavily influenced by Tsarist Russian doctrine (as was the soviet union.) Their uniforms even took many Tsarist elements. Yet they used a lot of German gear or German influenced gear in the war.
Classic post war soviet weapons are likely going to be butterflied, and that probably includes household ones such as the AK47. Soviet German co operation changed a lot, the Soviet Union likely jointly produced STG 44 with Germany, and due to that there won't be a major reason to design the AK47 post war when the STG 44 can fill Democratic Russia's needs. (within due time, it will be replaced of course, but not by a Kalishnikov, probably by something else entirely.
 
This isn't mine and was someone else post on Kalterkreig, but given the same winds blowing, the KMT infantry still will have this vibe
qteuk71jczn31.png

American M1 Helmet and Thompson gun, likely the gear used around the late 40s, yet I can see them soon enough switch to buying equipment from Democratic Russia (because America basically snubbed them for Japan, granted, they have a reason, given they entered the war late, yet chain will try and show its anger), so a Russian version of a STG44 and MG42 will probably end up in their arsenals. Probably some Italian French weapons will later show up. I don't know, soon enough, American weapons will probably disappear as they will want to give America the middle finger for pretty much being their nail in the coffin for Manchuria.
On that last point, yes Japan took Manchuria but I am saying that America recognizing that sent such land in stone, so it largely killed Chinese chances of retaking.
I think this is a good KMT uniform, I think ultimately Japan, Britain, China, Russia will all ditch their old traditional uniforms for modern battle dress (similar to OG 107)
The Soviet Union sort of led outdated uniforms to get another 40 years, but without them, I think all powers will use a sort of field dress similar to the one in the picture, and the helmets will all look something like the M1, M51, and Turtle.
 
Another question, what prompted the allies to declare war upon the USSR after her invasion of Eastern Poland?

It seems invading Poland went the same way and I wondered what went differently to make them declare war unlike OTL
The fact that the Sovs were also going to war with Japan. Basically a feeling that ‘if we let them at it they’ll have Eastern Poland and half of Asia - stop them now while we still can!’
 
@BiteNibbleChomp
What tank will Japan use late war and post war? I am talking heavy tanks. Do they get a version of the M29, or design something completely original?
In terms of their infantry being initially caught off guard, later war and post war, is their (infantry) troops modernized? As in equipment, uniforms, etc in general. (Japanese weapons were prone to jaming and the type 90 combat helmet was outdated) I figured increased co operation with Americans would speed the solving of those issues faster. Like perhaps adopting something developed from the M1 helmet and perhaps more modern combat fatigue (like similar to m1941 or later OG 107)
 
@BiteNibbleChomp
What tank will Japan use late war and post war? I am talking heavy tanks. Do they get a version of the M29, or design something completely original?
In terms of their infantry being initially caught off guard, later war and post war, is their (infantry) troops modernized? As in equipment, uniforms, etc in general. (Japanese weapons were prone to jaming and the type 90 combat helmet was outdated) I figured increased co operation with Americans would speed the solving of those issues faster. Like perhaps adopting something developed from the M1 helmet and perhaps more modern combat fatigue (like similar to m1941 or later OG 107)
Tanks wise the Japanese eventually use the Type 1 Chi-He and Type 3 Chi-Nu. There's no need to bring in monsters like the MacArthur because the Soviets are only sending their weaker units east (so T-34/76s at best in Siberia), while the tough stuff is kept to fight in Europe.
Infantry tactics did improve over the course of the war - several British officers spent years in Japan teaching tactics and also helping straighten out the IJA's numerous problems with discipline and other things. British style helmets also saw some adoption by the IJA from about the middle of the war. Small arms and the like also follow more of a British than an American direction - the old Anglo-Japanese alliance returned to their collective memory, Britain joined the war much earlier than the USA and having Australia and New Zealand nearby with some spare (old) equipment also helps. Then when the Americans come in their stuff sort of got lumped in too (it is cheap and there are a lot of US guns available).
By about 1943 the whole situation had become a bit chaotic, with some units using old Japanese arms, some British and some US, but modernised training did make a considerable difference. Organising arms production into a more standardised format would not really be done until post-war.

- BNC
 
Tanks wise the Japanese eventually use the Type 1 Chi-He and Type 3 Chi-Nu. There's no need to bring in monsters like the MacArthur because the Soviets are only sending their weaker units east (so T-34/76s at best in Siberia), while the tough stuff is kept to fight in Europe.
Infantry tactics did improve over the course of the war - several British officers spent years in Japan teaching tactics and also helping straighten out the IJA's numerous problems with discipline and other things. British style helmets also saw some adoption by the IJA from about the middle of the war. Small arms and the like also follow more of a British than an American direction - the old Anglo-Japanese alliance returned to their collective memory, Britain joined the war much earlier than the USA and having Australia and New Zealand nearby with some spare (old) equipment also helps. Then when the Americans come in their stuff sort of got lumped in too (it is cheap and there are a lot of US guns available).
By about 1943 the whole situation had become a bit chaotic, with some units using old Japanese arms, some British and some US, but modernised training did make a considerable difference. Organising arms production into a more standardised format would not really be done until post-war.

- BNC
Hmm. So post war due to anglo influence Japan may adopt the Turtle helmet as its Main helmet to replace both type 92 helmet and the brodie. Britain already started using the turtle late war.
Will post war more modern battle dress be adopted for the Japanese, akin to this below or the M1942/OG 107?

british mkIII.jpg

In terms of post war technology, do the Japanese upgrade their tanks? Based on what you said, during the war the Soviet's didn't send their monsters, but eventually China will develop them, perhaps Democratic Russia elects a slightly irrendist party, won't post war Japan develop heavy tanks to counter enemies? I assume they don't want a repeat of Manchuria and North Korea falling like that. Perhaps something developed from the Tortoise? Or maybe as it is post war, the Centurion? (basing this off you saying tank development has british influence in Japan)
 
Going back to Norway does King Haakon abdicate the throne when the Norwegian government surrenders? He threatened to do so OTL.
 
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Hmm. So post war due to anglo influence Japan may adopt the Turtle helmet as its Main helmet to replace both type 92 helmet and the brodie. Britain already started using the turtle late war.
Will post war more modern battle dress be adopted for the Japanese
Yep.

In terms of post war technology, do the Japanese upgrade their tanks? Based on what you said, during the war the Soviet's didn't send their monsters, but eventually China will develop them, perhaps Democratic Russia elects a slightly irrendist party, won't post war Japan develop heavy tanks to counter enemies? I assume they don't want a repeat of Manchuria and North Korea falling like that. Perhaps something developed from the Tortoise? Or maybe as it is post war, the Centurion? (basing this off you saying tank development has british influence in Japan)
By 1945 the Japanese have started a heavy tank program, which would go into production by 1947 so they have something to fight any Chinese imported heavies. It would look more like an up-armoured version of the OTL Type 4 Chi-To than any British design in particular, but still has some inspiration from the Tortoise.

Going back to Norway does King Haakon abdicate the throne when the Norwegian government surrenders? He threatened to do so OTL.
Exile in Britain, same as OTL (with a bit more denouncing of communism while he's there).

- BNC
 
Exile in Britain, same as OTL (with a bit more denouncing of communism while he's there).

- BNC
If I may clarify did Nygaardsvold leave Norway with the King as OTL? So it all went basically OTL with the government leaving Norway with him?

Does he return as King?
 
What became of Beria? Given the fact he was a calculating opportunist, did he negotiate with the allies shortly surrender like Himmler?

Naturally, likely such a attempt works fail, was he tried, and what was the sentence handed?
 
What became of Beria? Given the fact he was a calculating opportunist, did he negotiate with the allies shortly surrender like Himmler?

Naturally, likely such a attempt works fail, was he tried, and what was the sentence handed?
It wouldn't surprise me: he went out like a bitch, begging for mercy.

Granted, anybody who was about to be shot would do that. But it shows just how pathetic he was, that he would beg for mercy after causing numerous deaths.
 
What became of Beria? Given the fact he was a calculating opportunist, did he negotiate with the allies shortly surrender like Himmler?

Naturally, likely such a attempt works fail, was he tried, and what was the sentence handed?
It wouldn't surprise me: he went out like a bitch, begging for mercy.

Granted, anybody who was about to be shot would do that. But it shows just how pathetic he was, that he would beg for mercy after causing numerous deaths.
Actually he was killed during the coup that took Stalin out of power before the surrender. Any attempts by his corpse to negotiate with the Allies were most unsuccessful.

- BNC
 
Beria is then probably going to have a Himmler like status of being the "big bad." (Beria was a monster, but ironically in terms of politics, more moderate than Khruschev in many ways)
Yezhov didn't lead NKVD during the war, so his crimes will be more forgotten over time to be honest.
I do think Spielberg type films about NKVD attrocities will be made in this universe, and perhaps a film akin to downfall showing Stalin's last days before the coup and the plotting and scheming of the plotters as well as the counter plotters (Beria)
Seems due to Germany being far more incompetent their attrocities, while noted, will get the lower light given far less nations are affected, and the Soviet Union will be the "big bad." (its worth noting its implied the soviets continued the holocaust towards jewish people or at least didn't end it once Germany collapsed in the section describing communist grafiti.)
Will de communication occur? @BiteNibbleChomp
 
Beria is then probably going to have a Himmler like status of being the "big bad." (Beria was a monster, but ironically in terms of politics, more moderate than Khruschev in many ways)
Yezhov didn't lead NKVD during the war, so his crimes will be more forgotten over time to be honest.
I do think Spielberg type films about NKVD attrocities will be made in this universe, and perhaps a film akin to downfall showing Stalin's last days before the coup and the plotting and scheming of the plotters as well as the counter plotters (Beria)
Seems due to Germany being far more incompetent their attrocities, while noted, will get the lower light given far less nations are affected, and the Soviet Union will be the "big bad." (its worth noting its implied the soviets continued the holocaust towards jewish people or at least didn't end it once Germany collapsed in the section describing communist grafiti.)
Will de communication occur? @BiteNibbleChomp
Beria wasn't more moderate. His whole MO was "what will give me the most power and popularity."

Whether it was persecuting Caucasians, begging for mercy, or locking up scientists in sharashkas, everything he did was for the purpose of feeding his gluttonous desires.
 
Beria wasn't more moderate. His whole MO was "what will give me the most power and popularity."

Whether it was persecuting Caucasians, begging for mercy, or locking up scientists in sharashkas, everything he did was for the purpose of feeding his gluttonous desires.
My point isn't he was a saint - my point is he didn't give a shit about communist ideology, just what you listed yourself. He was pragmatic enough to adopt positions that were liberal - when it gave him more, you know, "conquests."
Naturally my point is that it is likely Beria will be potrayed as a nut job TTL due to NKVD and his crimes, even though he was just a selfish opportunist.
 
My point isn't he was a saint - my point is he didn't give a shit about communist ideology, just what you listed yourself. He was pragmatic enough to adopt positions that were liberal - when it gave him more, you know, "conquests."
Naturally my point is that it is likely Beria will be potrayed as a nut job TTL due to NKVD and his crimes, even though he was just a selfish opportunist.
Here is the way I see it:

Himmler commited worse crimes.

But Beria was a worse person.

And both of them were complete and total pussies. Beria, as you know, whimpered like a dog when he found himself in the same position as his victims. Himmler had the nerve to lie about what happened in the death camps, in a desperate attempt to save his own skin.
 
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