The Twin Vipers: A TL of the Berlin-Moscow Axis

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Seeing as the Soviet Union would like adopt a MG42 variant (it was so effective the successor MG3 is used until today!) I think the Soviet Version would look like this ^
Above is a Yugoslav M53, their own version, and the modifications done to the Soviet Version will likely be similar to that of the Yugoslav version given similar schools of thoughts in terms of armament.
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The STG 44 will likely also be produced in the Soviet Union as well, given in this timeline Hitler is willing to give away rocketry tech and jet engines, he will certainly give light arm designs away. It OTL arrived to late to really have any notable effect on the war, but this war continues longer (not notably longer but long enough for much more of these weapons to be mass produced in Soviet factories) and Soviet mass production will greatly increase its use.
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Edit: adding @cortz#9 photo, as it is simply too great to leave out. Will be interesting to see how this tank will evolve further in Democratic Russia or perhaps influence that of its opponents further. Tanks will be bigger than OTL for sure!
Also this photo of the T6 bear, or Panzer VI, credit to @Ramontxo for photo (smaller) and credit to @BiteNibbleChomp for figuring out the fusion of the Tiger and KV1 with a terrifying 122 or 128 gun, as well as the American counterpart developed, M29, also above. Shows how usage of these heavy tanks on great scale, and terrifying soviet ability to mass produce equipment at extremely rapid pace, will change tank warfare forever, even into the post war, as many cold war tanks were influenced by prominent WWII designs. Tanks might even be MORE heavy post war, however that will change a bit in the modern age, but yet will still have a notable imprint in terms of legacy and frontline tanks.
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Then the Mig/Horten 262 seeing ACTUAL mass use and not being a nazi fantasy Wunderwaffe, is going to change factors a bit post war. The shooting star seeing earlier use will probably prompt an even EARLIER global push toward the jet engine, with Japan, Italy, and even China soon trying to cash in on the Jet Engine revolution. War in many ways forces not exactly the speed of technology (at least not as much as popular opinion says) but rather determines its evolution and direction in may ways.
Edit: Typo
 
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Man though, the T6 Bear is terrifying given it is going to be mass produced in an excessive manner by the soviets, especially in the late war phase, and initially before the m29 is introduced, the allies lack a real counter. Armies are pretty cool in this timeline in terms of technology and weapons.
 
On the topic of Manchuria and Korea

I've already said that both stay a part of Japan into the modern day and regional identities are maintained (and in the case of Manchuria), reinforced. But seeing as I haven't given the 'word of God' about insurgencies or anything of that like, I might as well do so now.
The time for answering these questions isn't in the 2000s (when Japan may very well be in a bit of a decline phase), but in the 1950s, when they are the ascendant power in the region. In 1949 the Chinese declared a third war against Japan in the hopes of reclaiming Manchuria (which at this point was still an 'independent' state, with the public allowed to vote on low-level district representatives although not yet the overall government). Japan comes to Manchukuo's defence and pushes the Chinese back, before developing a nuke in 1951 and threatening to bomb Nanking with it unless they agree to an immediate white peace, which they do (all per the final threadmark of the TL). Then sometime within the following decade, Manchukuo votes to be annexed by Japan once Puyi dies.
During this time, insurgencies in Korea and Manchuria are very much a possibility - if China and Japan are already in open war then there isn't really any reprisals possible beyond what is already ongoing. Japanese mistreatment of Koreans, particularly before 1940, is still fresh in a lot of peoples' minds, so uprisings would have some measure of popular support, and the IJA is already distracted fighting the Chinese army, so there's a much greater opportunity for disruption.
However Japan then wins the war, and any remaining rebel groups are going to be crushed by an angry IJA. Ordinary Koreans would come out of this alright (a big focus of the IJA after 1943 was disciplining rogue officers, and by 1951 I think it is fair to assume that problem has been adequately solved) - the Japanese government is trying to integrate them after all, but the majority of nationalist groups would have been disbanded and their leaders killed, which would weaken the movement for a good few years at least.

Contrast this with the 2000s. By this point, Manchurians and Koreans have been doing reasonably well for themselves under Japanese rule, and virtually everyone living there has never known any different (older Manchurians will remember Manchukuo, but that was still pretty much 'Japan' in a different coat of paint). They have the vote, and while Japanese have a plurality of the votes they do not have an absolute majority, so proposals that don't treat non-Japanese fairly aren't going to get passed. (The real 'victims' here are true minorities such as Pacific islanders, who don't fit neatly into the "three peoples" narrative that Japan likes to push).
The only power that really has anything to gain from a breakup of Greater Japan is the ROC, so it is pretty obvious that Japan's attention is going to be on them. The two are very much rivals and the land border they share is armed. The IJN is the second strongest navy in the world (after the USN) and controls the seas along China's coast (Vietnam, one of Japan's closest allies, hosts a Japanese naval base). Getting guns or money across that border is going to be difficult. Possible in the case of Manchuria (one can go through Russia), but extremely unlikely in the case of Korea, at least to any meaningful degree.
Because of Japanese efforts to support a "three equal peoples" narrative, Manchurians and Koreans can get most of what they want through the ballot box. The only issue that would not be ever passable would be outright independence (Japanese oppose it because maintaining the existing borders is seen as very important, Manchurians or Koreans would oppose the independence of the other because it hands control of the government entirely to the Japanese, who outnumber each group individually). So if they're going to rise up in insurgency-level numbers it would be if they want independence.
If Manchuria was to gain independence after an uprising, the remainder of Japan isn't going to be too happy with them about it. The sort of defence against China that occurred in 1949 won't be extended to a new Manchurian state which would be seen as traitors to Japan. The ROC would definitely invade as soon as they were ready - they were just as fanatical about "one China" as the modern PRC is, and while their army is about on par with the combined forces of Greater Japan, it is much larger than that of Manchuria alone. So Manchuria would very quickly be annexed by Nanking, whose first priority will be destroying this new Manchurian culture and making everyone Han - a fate most Manchurians would be quite fearful of. They also go from having 30% control of government to perhaps 5 or 10% with a much more united opposition. 30% can't be easily ignored, 5% certainly can. There's nothing really to be gained by rebellion.
If Korea was to rebel instead, they probably don't have to fear the Chinese as much (no land border, and not seen as "Chinese" by those in Nanking). However, a Korea that has made an enemy of Japan is also going to be in a lot of trouble - they're surrounded on all sides but one by Japan, and that last side is the East China Sea, which the IJN dominates. If Japan doesn't outright re-invade Korea (depending on the government in charge at the time, it very well might), they could easily cripple the state's economy with an embargo. Korea has also gone from the third most important player in a very strong state to the sole player in a relatively weak state, which is hardly an improvement.
People only tend to rebel when times are bad, and Manchurians and Koreans think that times under Japanese rule are reasonably good.

Then the Mig/Horten 229 seeing ACTUAL mass use and not being a nazi fantasy Wunderwaffe, is going to change factors a bit post war.
The Ho 229 'Flying Wing' isn't used ITTL. MiG uses a copy of the Me 262, and then a slightly smaller analogue of the MiG-15.
I never really said much about small arms but definitely agree that something like the MG42 would find its way into Soviet (and then Russian) arsenals.

- BNC
 
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Also this photo of the T6 bear, or Panzer VI, credit to @Ramontxo for photo (smaller) and credit to @BiteNibbleChomp for figuring out the fusion of the Tiger and KV1 with a terrifying 122 or 128 gun, as well as the American counterpart developed, M29, also above. Shows how usage of these heavy tanks on great scale, and terrifying soviet ability to mass produce equipment at extremely rapid pace, will change tank warfare forever, even into the post war, as many cold war tanks were influenced by prominent WWII designs. Tanks might even be MORE heavy post war, however that will change a bit in the modern age, but yet will still have a notable imprint in terms of legacy and frontline tanks.
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I liked my take on the Pz.VI better. :cool:
 
You phrased my issue with the revolt better and more respectfully than I did. Thanks.
Also, just a typo on the Jet Fighter (hence I posted the correct jet though.) I do though also believe Nazi Germany and Soviet union will jointly produce something like the STG 44 late war, and it will see a lot of use 45-46 in the Soviet Union.
 
I am glad this timeline has a sane, plausible ending. A lot of timelines in this site either have an extremely utopian ending (you cannot exactly call this "utopian" with the powers like Italy and Japan) and also not extreme grim dark traps a lot of timelines fall into (sometimes there is a reason, sometimes it just seems in many ways an intentional crapsack). This kind of gives a "just right" feeling and it is an easily imaginable world to live in. I think it has a bright ending yet not utopian, and certainly global problems but not apocalyptic or dystopia in my view.
 
I am glad this timeline has a sane, plausible ending. A lot of timelines in this site either have an extremely utopian ending (you cannot exactly call this "utopian" with the powers like Italy and Japan) and also not extreme grim dark traps a lot of timelines fall into (sometimes there is a reason, sometimes it just seems in many ways an intentional crapsack). This kind of gives a "just right" feeling and it is an easily imaginable world to live in. I think it has a bright ending yet not utopian, and certainly global problems but not apocalyptic or dystopia in my view.
I'd agree. It's got its own problems and not a utopia, but it's also not gone dystopian, and there's some stuff that's better. Less danger of nuclear war, the absence of the USSR means that it's hard to hold up progressive legislation or change by screaming 'COMMUNISM!' because...well, as an example, it's hard to accuse Civil Rights leaders of being Moscow's stooges because, well, no Moscow. Also, HUAC and the Blacklist likely don't happen, along with possibly no Lavender Scare either...an absence of which can only be good for America.
 
Post war, I think democratic Russia can make major money through sales of Soviet Surpluss arms. China, in the 1949 war, despite anger with the Soviets, given their problems with the Americans, may buy Soviet eqiupemnt from Democratic Russia. Russia has no real reason anymore to have a massive military, so T34s can end up in other nations arsenals, as well as the really cool shit like the T6 for high prices though.
I think given the allies lack of ability to really do versailles style arms limitations anymore (but they have a nuclear deterrent instead so who needs that) democratic Russia will retain some degree of Soviet arms industry however less so for equipping its own military (of course, still that, but more importantly,) sales abroad.
In terms of the domestic Russian army in the post war era, I can see it dropping a lot of Soviet associated symbolism. Red flags will soon probably be replaced with Imperial era and white army banners. No more red stars. Also, since the army will naturally shrink to a small size (in terms of its population) as russia has other priorities, I think it will focus more on quality. The world war II era tanks will probably further get upgraded and retrofitted, while new design will probably come out, but due to the focus on quality and less on mass production, and also due to the co operation with Nazi Germany in armament causing a lot of butteries, will look less like Soviet armor of OTL. Co operation with former allied nations will probably have them have complex operating systems in the age of more electronics more akin to a western tank like Abrams, Challenger, Le Clerc, or Leopard, in contrast to the clear simplicity of say, a T72.
In terms of the individual soldier I think red army tunics will get dropped, both because they are sort of outdated, and also to show a new ideological tilt from its past, into something more similar to the BD 107. White army symbols will continue their use in the form of army patches on to these modern uniforms.
And yes, I do think the soviet weaponry will remain though, eventually being replaced by newer Russian designs. The Soviet version of the MG42 might remain in use to modern day in some form, as after all, the Bundeswehr uses a modern MG42 (MG3) and likely for some decades the STG44 (probably patented by the Soviets shown by Hitler, if he can show Jet secrets, he can show assault rifles) will remain in use, perhaps funny enough butterflying the AK47, and completely changing Russian rifle history in the process!
 
Just discovered this TL the other day and just now finished it. Loved it btw. I'm curious about a few things film related ITTL if you don't mind giving an opinion.

First off Akira Kurosawa, with Japan faring much better ITTL his career is drastically changed. With Japan allied to the Western powers he would be able to use his Western film influences far sooner than OTL. Another interesting change comes from the lack of an American occupation postwar. As many of his films set in contemporary settings dealt with the occupation in some way. But probably the most important change is that the nuclear bombs were never dropped ITTL. Which heavily effected Kurosawa through out his life and career.

The second filmmaker is the much too underrated Samuel Fuller. Fuller served with the 1st Infantry Division in WWII IOTL from Africa through Europe and eventually liberated a German concentration camp. These experiences were encapsulated in his most famous film The Big Red One. My conclusion is that he probably followed a very similar path ITTL. And I am curious what battles the 1st Infantry Division took part ITTL.

Again I very much enjoyed reading this wonderful TL of yours. And I will be looking forward to reading your other works soon.
 
Post war, I think democratic Russia can make major money through sales of Soviet Surpluss arms. China, in the 1949 war, despite anger with the Soviets, given their problems with the Americans, may buy Soviet eqiupemnt from Democratic Russia.
Can definitely see that happening. A T-34 is still a great improvement over the M2s and BT-5s that made up most of the Chinese arsenal before that, and considering the other option is a Sherman (rated as junk by virtually everyone in a world where Wolves and other heavies are commonplace) then it is a sensible choice. Considering how many spares the Russians have, they'd probably get them quite cheap too.

Just discovered this TL the other day and just now finished it. Loved it btw.
Always good to have new readers :)

First off Akira Kurosawa, with Japan faring much better ITTL his career is drastically changed. With Japan allied to the Western powers he would be able to use his Western film influences far sooner than OTL. Another interesting change comes from the lack of an American occupation postwar. As many of his films set in contemporary settings dealt with the occupation in some way. But probably the most important change is that the nuclear bombs were never dropped ITTL. Which heavily effected Kurosawa through out his life and career.
I've never heard of him before, so I won't chart out a life for a character I know nothing about. However, Japan (or at least Manchukuo) did get occupied first by the Soviets and then in 1949-50 by the Chinese, so if he decides to make films about war there's ample opportunity to do so.

The second filmmaker is the much too underrated Samuel Fuller. Fuller served with the 1st Infantry Division in WWII IOTL from Africa through Europe and eventually liberated a German concentration camp. These experiences were encapsulated in his most famous film The Big Red One. My conclusion is that he probably followed a very similar path ITTL. And I am curious what battles the 1st Infantry Division took part ITTL.
1st Division (or any other division for that matter) never had its route to Moscow mapped out - if it makes a better story then let's just say "all the big ones". Surrounding the Germans in 1943, the Rhineland '44, Berlin '44 and Moscow '46. Because riding with Patton is always going to make a good film :)
Again, this isn't really a topic I know that much about, so go with whatever you think is cool.

- BNC
 
What became of Bulganin after he surrendered the USSR?
He retired into obscurity, mostly living off the money made from publishing his memoirs (he was close enough to Stalin's regime to have some interesting stories to tell about it, yet far enough removed from power that he wasn't seen as a threat by the new government). He never really renounced communism, but at the same time accepted that it wasn't coming back after Stalin's downfall. The 1950 communist coup's leaders believed that Bulganin was a traitor and did not seek for him to join them, nor did he seek them out.

- BNC
 
The development of the imperial army with American aid, is going to be interesting. The fact they fought a major war together will help relations. And you might argue that didn't work with the Soviets, but Japan isn't the massive ideological threat the soviets were. Also while the Soviet movement moved further into Stalinist totalitarianism and even didn't improve significantly during the Khruschev era, Japan has a civilian government. I think just strategically thinking, America will be more concerned about a revanchist China and try and calm the situation.
I do like how @BiteNibbleChomp described how they co operated during the war. I wonder if M29 will be in use by the Empire - If not during the war, I could se a Japanese patented version post war as it will want to catch up in the field of Armor, and I think ultimately it will evolve into a unique Japanese design as upgrades occur.
Given how Russia isn't really demilitarized post war, it is likely they will still produce the T6 tank actually, maintaining a small force, yet I think the greater purpose will be its export. Japan will likely adopt a heavy tank like the M29 or even - seeing the direction the wind is blowing in tank warfare, design its own heavy tank. Thus I think the less experienced Chinese military industry may purchase designs and reverse engineer the Bear for KMT use.
Tanks are getting really big, first the Wolf/Bear, then the M29, then the Tortoise. I see it as only a matter of time where the other nations, whether Japan, China, Italy, or even France soon enough will seek to catch up
The Bear for some time will remain the pinnacle of Democratic Russia's armor, but when it gets replaced, the direction of Tank warfare will change. I just can't see T55s coming out of Democratic Russia or a focus on insane mass production. I think more refined and intricate designs, more akin to western ones will come, both due to a lack of need of mass mobilization, probably more willingness of technical experts to assist a democratic nation, and also the switch to focus on quality for export. At the very least, Russian tanks will have better internal systems. Yet I also think they will look more like Abrams, Leopards, Le Clercs or Challengers since the butterflies of Soviet Nazi co operation led to an increased focus on size. Without a insane cold war, yet many regional rivalries, there isn't exactly a need to pop out tens of thousands of tanks.
 
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Seeing as the Soviet Union would like adopt a MG42 variant (it was so effective the successor MG3 is used until today!) I think the Soviet Version would look like this ^
Above is a Yugoslav M53, their own version, and the modifications done to the Soviet Version will likely be similar to that of the Yugoslav version given similar schools of thoughts in terms of armament.
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The STG 44 will likely also be produced in the Soviet Union as well, given in this timeline Hitler is willing to give away rocketry tech and jet engines, he will certainly give light arm designs away. It OTL arrived to late to really have any notable effect on the war, but this war continues longer (not notably longer but long enough for much more of these weapons to be mass produced in Soviet factories) and Soviet mass production will greatly increase its use.
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Edit: adding @cortz#9 photo, as it is simply too great to leave out. Will be interesting to see how this tank will evolve further in Democratic Russia or perhaps influence that of its opponents further. Tanks will be bigger than OTL for sure!
Also this photo of the T6 bear, or Panzer VI, credit to @Ramontxo for photo (smaller) and credit to @BiteNibbleChomp for figuring out the fusion of the Tiger and KV1 with a terrifying 122 or 128 gun, as well as the American counterpart developed, M29, also above. Shows how usage of these heavy tanks on great scale, and terrifying soviet ability to mass produce equipment at extremely rapid pace, will change tank warfare forever, even into the post war, as many cold war tanks were influenced by prominent WWII designs. Tanks might even be MORE heavy post war, however that will change a bit in the modern age, but yet will still have a notable imprint in terms of legacy and frontline tanks.
View attachment 515190View attachment 515191

Then the Mig/Horten 262 seeing ACTUAL mass use and not being a nazi fantasy Wunderwaffe, is going to change factors a bit post war. The shooting star seeing earlier use will probably prompt an even EARLIER global push toward the jet engine, with Japan, Italy, and even China soon trying to cash in on the Jet Engine revolution. War in many ways forces not exactly the speed of technology (at least not as much as popular opinion says) but rather determines its evolution and direction in may ways.
Edit: Typo
Just noticed you added my pic of the Pz.VI, much appreciated. :)

As to the PZ.VI's influence on post war development, I would think heavy tanks would more prominent in the major armies of the world until they start fighting wars in jungles and other places where lighter tanks would be more useful and medium tanks would then become the norm and lastly the main battle tank would reign dominant.
So tank development could be slower ITTL.
 
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Just finished reading this timeline, and it was a brilliant read.

What are living standards in China like for Chinese and minorities? Better than OTL?
 
Just finished reading this timeline, and it was a brilliant read.
Glad you enjoyed it :)

What are living standards in China like for Chinese and minorities? Better than OTL?
Economic development in China is about 5-10 years ahead of OTL, with the improvements in living standards that follow. Minorities still have a very rough go of it - the KMT is above all nationalist - but there's no gulags or Orwellian-style mass surveillance programs.

- BNC
 
Just noticed you added my pic of the Pz.VI, much appreciated. :)

As to the PZ.VI's influence on post war development, I would think heavy tanks would more prominent in the major armies of the world until they start fighting wars in jungles and other places where lighter tanks would be more useful and medium tanks would then become the norm and lastly the main battle tank would reign dominant.
So tank development could be slower ITTL.
It’s interesting as without a insane ideological Cold War occurring in this timeline (though many regional rivalries) irregular and guerilla warfare will probably be less common. I think conventional warfare will be more frequent due to the fact as I said, regional national rivalries. Russia, Poland, Ukraine hating each other, China and Japan, probably Italy disliking France and also probably Russia if it remains tied to Ukraine.

I think you have a good idea but I wouldn’t exactly say tank development “slows down” I just think maybe tanks evolve differently for another strategic reality.

I do wonder if japan will take an M29 or create a completely indigenous heavy tank. Either way, the M29 or whatever indigenous tank will obviously be manufactured in Japan, therefore, it would effectively be their tank.

I think Italy will take P.VI/Bear tanks that are captured, they won’t reverse engineer but try and study certain elements for a Italian heavy tank. Italy has a pretty prosperous armor industry at this time so no need to reverse engineer.

I think while the P.VI/bear has no production future in Germany, no one can really stop democratic Russia to be honest from producing this tank and perhaps modernizing it with time. After all, it only makes sense to make a lot of money by exporting it to nations like China and india, or the middle east, where demand will be strong.

I do find it interesting that Russian armies will carry a lot of German influenced weapons and use a lot of German influence in their army, even post war. I expect the Russian version of the MG42 and Stg44 to ironically butterfly away the PKM as well as the classic kalishnikov, and the T6 Bear to probably butterfly away the T55 (democratic Russia probably won’t focus on mass production, it simply doesn’t need a massive military, its existence is probably scary enough to Poland and Ukraine in all honesty.)

With Nazi and Soviet armies influencing each other a lot, I wonder what will occur I terms of uniforms in all honesty. I could see Soviet helmets looking still more like the stahlhelm (see SSh-36) for reference, probably an increased use of camo in the Soviets. Meanwhile for arctic wafare I could see Germans using ushanka hats.

Interestingly as the German government and whatever remains of its armed forces go into exile to make their last stand with Stalin, they may end up simply for ease of supply reasons looking identical to soviet troops minus insignia in late war. Granted by then the German exile gov under Stalin will merely be his proxy in all honesty. Then again, as I coveted, Soviet troops will probably take a lot of German elements, notably in helmets and camo smocks.

Now I am not saying soviet troops would lose their Russian heritage. I am pointing to the fact that almost armies that co opted with Nazi Germany took certain elements from them, such as KMT, Finland, and Spain. Due to a outright alliance though, it just makes a lot of sense for a lot of joint influence between Germany and USSR.
 
It’s interesting as without a insane ideological Cold War occurring in this timeline (though many regional rivalries) irregular and guerilla warfare will probably be less common. I think conventional warfare will be more frequent due to the fact as I said, regional national rivalries. Russia, Poland, Ukraine hating each other, China and Japan, probably Italy disliking France and also probably Russia if it remains tied to Ukraine.

I think you have a good idea but I wouldn’t exactly say tank development “slows down” I just think maybe tanks evolve differently for another strategic reality.

I do wonder if japan will take an M29 or create a completely indigenous heavy tank. Either way, the M29 or whatever indigenous tank will obviously be manufactured in Japan, therefore, it would effectively be their tank.

I think Italy will take P.VI/Bear tanks that are captured, they won’t reverse engineer but try and study certain elements for a Italian heavy tank. Italy has a pretty prosperous armor industry at this time so no need to reverse engineer.

I think while the P.VI/bear has no production future in Germany, no one can really stop democratic Russia to be honest from producing this tank and perhaps modernizing it with time. After all, it only makes sense to make a lot of money by exporting it to nations like China and india, or the middle east, where demand will be strong.

I do find it interesting that Russian armies will carry a lot of German influenced weapons and use a lot of German influence in their army, even post war. I expect the Russian version of the MG42 and Stg44 to ironically butterfly away the PKM as well as the classic kalishnikov, and the T6 Bear to probably butterfly away the T55 (democratic Russia probably won’t focus on mass production, it simply doesn’t need a massive military, its existence is probably scary enough to Poland and Ukraine in all honesty.)

With Nazi and Soviet armies influencing each other a lot, I wonder what will occur I terms of uniforms in all honesty. I could see Soviet helmets looking still more like the stahlhelm (see SSh-36) for reference, probably an increased use of camo in the Soviets. Meanwhile for arctic wafare I could see Germans using ushanka hats.

Interestingly as the German government and whatever remains of its armed forces go into exile to make their last stand with Stalin, they may end up simply for ease of supply reasons looking identical to soviet troops minus insignia in late war. Granted by then the German exile gov under Stalin will merely be his proxy in all honesty. Then again, as I coveted, Soviet troops will probably take a lot of German elements, notably in helmets and camo smocks.

Now I am not saying soviet troops would lose their Russian heritage. I am pointing to the fact that almost armies that co opted with Nazi Germany took certain elements from them, such as KMT, Finland, and Spain. Due to a outright alliance though, it just makes a lot of sense for a lot of joint influence between Germany and USSR.
Very interesting and perhaps my use of the word "slower" was incorrect, what I really meant is that the focus of tank development might take a different (alternate) direction ITTL than our own but things would straighten out a little later due to the changing picture of warfare in the post-WWII era.
I'm really curious to see what happened to Germany in the post war years and a German influenced Russia would be very interesting as well, the image of soldiers in WWII era German combat uniforms with post WWII Soviet weapons is an interesting one.
 
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