The German Century

Since the colonies had no industry worth the name - no colony of any nation had at this time - they're going to be hard pressed to produce much of anything. External suppliers are not likely to line up and make offers, too busy with things closer to home.
Algeria was a different sort of colony in the fact that it had a sizable settler population rather than just being under European administration. Similar to South Africa I suppose. That makes it easier for the Fourth Republic, but I never said it would be easy. My guess is that they elect some sort of fascist type government quite early
 
The Third (soon 4th) Republic-in-exile. While small and defenseless, they're protected by the British fleet.
Well given that Britain has suffered a Weimar Germany-esque situation in so far as communist revolts and the secession of Ireland and Egypt are concerned it won't last long and the French government-in-exile in Africa will have to build up it's military to defend it from any Communist French invasion.
 
RETCON!
I've decided to alter the story in 'The Dark Knights'. There's no civil war and the monarchy stays in power. Mussolini still attains power as OTL, this time with a defeat on everyone's mind instead of 'mutilated victory'.
 
The Age of Rage: India

The Age of Rage: India

During the Great War, India supplied men and resources to the war effort. Millions of Indian soldiers had fought in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East with the whole Raj sending supplies of food, money, and ammunition. Despite this, there were Indian nationalists determined to end British rule in India. Throughout the war, there were several plots to start an uprising supported by the Central Powers. None of them came to fruition however, as the British authorities quickly acted on these threats and arrested the ringleaders.

With the war over, the Indian nationalists felt the empire was finally weakened. Activists in Bengal and Punjab went to work, sparking revolutionary activity to the point where the regional administrations were nearly paralyzed. This became significant to the point where the British government refused to pass the Government of India bill in late 1919. To the British administrators, this was a foolish mistake that would soon prove them right.

A Place of No Return
On April 13, 1919, the subcontinent’s destiny would change forever. In Amritsar, a traditional festival was going on where people gathered in the Jallianwala Bagh square to celebrate. Among the crowd were simple men, women, and children going about their day. During the festivities, a few nationalists were making speeches on soapboxes. In the previous months, an order had been issued banning large meetings in the open.

When General Reginald Dyer heard of this, he immediately sprang into action. He went to the location with a force of Gurkha and Sikh troops along with an armored car (though he couldn’t get the car through the narrow entrance). Once the troops had lined up, he ordered them to aim their rifles on the crowd. When a younger officer asked if they should give a short warning, Dyer simply replied “They had their warning, no meetings.”.

Shortly after that, the General ordered the men to open fire. For ten bloody minutes, the troops fired on the thickest part of the crowd. When the shooting was directed at the center, people ran to the sides. When they ran to the sides, the firing was then directed to the sides. Many people threw themselves to the ground, but it was futile as the firing was then directed to the ground. The firing continued until their ammunition was nearly exhausted. When the dust cleared, 379 people lay dead on the field.


A painting of the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre

When news of the massacre spread, many moderate Indians abandoned any loyalty they had to the Raj and became members of the independence movement. Even many Brits were horrified at the massacre except those who saw Dyer as a hero for restoring law and order in Punjab.

To prove his point further, Dyer decided to teach the Indians a harsh lesson. On a street where an Englishwoman had recently been attacked, the general ordered those wishing to cross that particular street must crawl on their belly. Anyone who defied this order was tied to a pole and whipped.


An Indian crawling in the lane in front of British soldiers, 1919

Enough is Enough
Over the next few years, anger by Sikhs, Hindus, and Muslims reach a boiling point. The violence continued with troops opening fire on the protestors. In Dhaka, 1922, a mutiny breaks out among the troops after refusing to fire on civilians, engulfing the whole of Bengal. The same thing happens in Punjab province where rebellious soldiers raided the armory and handed out guns to those who volunteered. Across northern India, British troops are attacked and European civilians murdered as the authorities lose control over whole areas.

During this chaos, 2 leaders rose to lead the struggle. Jawaharlal Nehru and Subhas Chandra Bose. Together, they joined forces and captured more areas from the British until the whole of northern India was theirs. Both men were members of the Indian National Congress, the main political party in India.

Fearing a collapse of their jewel in the crown, the British request their Dominions to send troops to India. They all answered the call as the Dominions send men and equipment to India. The Empire was determined to maintain control over India while the rebels were equally determined to free the sub-continent. In 1924, the continent’s fate would be decided in a small valley somewhere in the Central Provinces.


The Indian Revolution, 1924
 
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Curse the devil Dyer !

With popular anger at the British at an all time high and with them being broke for all intents and purposes, even the most Anglophilic of the Princes are going to have difficulties siding with the British, thus avoiding a repeat of 1857.
 
Curse the devil Dyer !

With popular anger at the British at an all time high and with them being broke for all intents and purposes, even the most Anglophilic of the Princes are going to have difficulties siding with the British, thus avoiding a repeat of 1857.
If local princes try side with Brits they are going face anger of their subjects. They are now on really difficult situation.

Best what Brits can do now are direct negotiations with India and perhaps give dominion status for North. And better now learn that massacring of peaceful demonstrators is not best possible solution.
 
Curse the devil Dyer !

With popular anger at the British at an all time high and with them being broke for all intents and purposes, even the most Anglophilic of the Princes are going to have difficulties siding with the British, thus avoiding a repeat of 1857.
No, what you have to understand is that quite a bit of those local princes were sheer opportunists, who would have jumped ship if not for certain cases. Mostly, their heirs were to be educated in England as a reward, which was a polite way of saying they were glorified hostages, and their heirs stuck in England were specimens for the British aristocrats to show off as if they were some of sort of prize collections. This was around the time of the East India Company till the Early years of British Raj (1830 - 1870). Later on, things became more civil, but the damage was done. These next generation rulers were rather mildly brainwashed from their education in England, which made them loyal to the British govt. Another form of control they used during the EIC was to play off each of these kingdoms against one other. Offer to protect Prince A from Prince B and Prince B from Prince A, at the same time. Then, sell them weapons and ask for taxes in return for protection. This was the earliest form of legalized protection rackets and debt-trapping, but nobody was smart enough to realize, and those who realized were too weak to do a damn thing.

But the true damage for their colony in India, in my opinion, was by the education system the British set up for their colonial subjects. When the Indian citizens became more educated, they realized what a bad hand they were being dealt, and that is what motivated them to start their movement for independence.

Well, I went off on a bit of a rant off-track, but for this story, it seems that the nationalists are winning support instead of the congress who were hardcore pacifists at the time, due to Gandhi's gargantuan influence. I Wonder how he will react to this turn of events?
 
Given how divergant Nehru and Boise ended up, I wonder how long it takes before they turn on each other - not to mention the hindu/muslim conflict bound to prop up.
If the British wanted to be ruthless, they'd stir them up and mop up the rest: like give muslim protectorates/dominions in Pakistan and the east as well as Sikh or Jain autonomous zones, then offer one faction self rule if they subordinate to the Colonial government
 
Given how divergant Nehru and Boise ended up, I wonder how long it takes before they turn on each other - not to mention the hindu/muslim conflict bound to prop up.
If the British wanted to be ruthless, they'd stir them up and mop up the rest: like give muslim protectorates/dominions in Pakistan and the east as well as Sikh or Jain autonomous zones, then offer one faction self rule if they subordinate to the Colonial government
They will get ruthless in this endeavor. At this point, they have nothing to lose. If they lose India, they lose their status as a superpower. They will go scorched earth if necessary to retain control. Churchill is going to be out for blood. Not that it was hard for him in the first place. The man had a hate boner bigger than the Eiffel tower when it came to Gandhi and the Indian Independence movement in general IOTL.
 

Age of Rage: India

During the Great War, India supplied men and resources to the war effort. Millions of Indian soldiers had fought in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East with the whole Raj sending supplies of food, money, and ammunition. Despite this, there were Indian nationalists determined to end British rule in India. Throughout the war, there were several plots to start an uprising supported by the Central Powers. None of them came to fruition however, as the British authorities quickly acted on these threats and arrested the ringleaders.

With the war over, the Indian nationalists felt the empire was finally weakened. Activists in Bengal and Punjab went to work, sparking revolutionary activity to the point where the regional administrations were nearly paralyzed. This became significant to the point where the British government refused to pass the Government of India bill in late 1919. To the British administrators, this was a foolish mistake that would soon prove them right.

A Place of No Return
On April 13, 1919, the subcontinent’s destiny would change forever. In Amritsar, a traditional festival was going on where people gathered in the Jallianwala Bagh square to celebrate. Among the crowd were simple men, women, and children going about their day. During the festivities, a few nationalists were making speeches on soapboxes. In the previous months, an order had been issued banning large meetings in the open.

When General Reginald Dyer heard of this, he immediately sprang into action. He went to the location with a force of Gurkha and Sikh troops along with an armored car (though he couldn’t get the car through the narrow entrance). Once the troops had lined up, he ordered them to aim their rifles on the crowd. When a younger officer asked if they should give a short warning, Dyer simply replied “They had their warning, no meetings.”.

Shortly after that, the General ordered the men to open fire. For ten bloody minutes, the troops fired on the thickest part of the crowd. When the shooting was directed at the center, people ran to the sides. When they ran to the sides, the firing was then directed to the sides. Many people threw themselves to the ground, but it was futile as the firing was then directed to the ground. The firing continued until their ammunition was nearly exhausted. When the dust cleared, 379 people lay dead on the field.


A painting of the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre

When news of the massacre spread, many moderate Indians abandoned any loyalty they had to the Raj and became members of the independence movement. Even many Brits were horrified at the massacre except those who saw Dyer as a hero for restoring law and order in Punjab.

To prove his point further, Dyer decided to teach the Indians a harsh lesson. On a street where an Englishwoman had recently been attacked, the general ordered those wishing to cross that particular street must crawl on their belly. Anyone who defied this order was tied to a pole and whipped.


An Indian crawling in the lane in front of British soldiers, 1919

Enough is Enough
Over the next few years, anger by Sikhs, Hindus, and Muslims reach a boiling point. The violence continued with troops opening fire on the protestors. In Dhaka, 1922, a mutiny breaks out among the troops after refusing to fire on civilians, engulfing the whole of Bengal. The same thing happens in Punjab province where rebellious soldiers raided the armory and handed out guns to those who volunteered. Across northern India, British troops are attacked and European civilians murdered as the authorities lose control over whole areas.

During this chaos, 2 leaders rose to lead the struggle. Jawaharlal Nehru and Subhas Chandra Bose. Together, they joined forces and captured more areas from the British until the whole of northern India was theirs. Both men were members of the Indian National Congress, the main political party in India.

Fearing a collapse of their jewel in the crown, the British request their Dominions to send troops to India. They all answered the call as the Dominions send men and equipment to India. The Empire was determined to maintain control over India while the rebels were equally determined to free the sub-continent. In 1924, the continent’s fate would be decided in a small valley somewhere in the Central Provinces.


The Indian Revolution, 1924
Britain has lost Ireland and Egypt in revolutions as well as fighting communists in Scotland. Soon India will be next assuming the rebels are successful. Britain is probably going to go down the path of dictatorship (fascist or communist under Oswald Mosley since he did transition between ideologies).
 

Pangur

Donor

The Age of Rage: India

During the Great War, India supplied men and resources to the war effort. Millions of Indian soldiers had fought in Europe, Africa, and the Middle East with the whole Raj sending supplies of food, money, and ammunition. Despite this, there were Indian nationalists determined to end British rule in India. Throughout the war, there were several plots to start an uprising supported by the Central Powers. None of them came to fruition however, as the British authorities quickly acted on these threats and arrested the ringleaders.

With the war over, the Indian nationalists felt the empire was finally weakened. Activists in Bengal and Punjab went to work, sparking revolutionary activity to the point where the regional administrations were nearly paralyzed. This became significant to the point where the British government refused to pass the Government of India bill in late 1919. To the British administrators, this was a foolish mistake that would soon prove them right.

A Place of No Return
On April 13, 1919, the subcontinent’s destiny would change forever. In Amritsar, a traditional festival was going on where people gathered in the Jallianwala Bagh square to celebrate. Among the crowd were simple men, women, and children going about their day. During the festivities, a few nationalists were making speeches on soapboxes. In the previous months, an order had been issued banning large meetings in the open.

When General Reginald Dyer heard of this, he immediately sprang into action. He went to the location with a force of Gurkha and Sikh troops along with an armored car (though he couldn’t get the car through the narrow entrance). Once the troops had lined up, he ordered them to aim their rifles on the crowd. When a younger officer asked if they should give a short warning, Dyer simply replied “They had their warning, no meetings.”.

Shortly after that, the General ordered the men to open fire. For ten bloody minutes, the troops fired on the thickest part of the crowd. When the shooting was directed at the center, people ran to the sides. When they ran to the sides, the firing was then directed to the sides. Many people threw themselves to the ground, but it was futile as the firing was then directed to the ground. The firing continued until their ammunition was nearly exhausted. When the dust cleared, 379 people lay dead on the field.


A painting of the Jallianwala Bagh Massacre

When news of the massacre spread, many moderate Indians abandoned any loyalty they had to the Raj and became members of the independence movement. Even many Brits were horrified at the massacre except those who saw Dyer as a hero for restoring law and order in Punjab.

To prove his point further, Dyer decided to teach the Indians a harsh lesson. On a street where an Englishwoman had recently been attacked, the general ordered those wishing to cross that particular street must crawl on their belly. Anyone who defied this order was tied to a pole and whipped.


An Indian crawling in the lane in front of British soldiers, 1919

Enough is Enough
Over the next few years, anger by Sikhs, Hindus, and Muslims reach a boiling point. The violence continued with troops opening fire on the protestors. In Dhaka, 1922, a mutiny breaks out among the troops after refusing to fire on civilians, engulfing the whole of Bengal. The same thing happens in Punjab province where rebellious soldiers raided the armory and handed out guns to those who volunteered. Across northern India, British troops are attacked and European civilians murdered as the authorities lose control over whole areas.

During this chaos, 2 leaders rose to lead the struggle. Jawaharlal Nehru and Subhas Chandra Bose. Together, they joined forces and captured more areas from the British until the whole of northern India was theirs. Both men were members of the Indian National Congress, the main political party in India.

Fearing a collapse of their jewel in the crown, the British request their Dominions to send troops to India. They all answered the call as the Dominions send men and equipment to India. The Empire was determined to maintain control over India while the rebels were equally determined to free the sub-continent. In 1924, the continent’s fate would be decided in a small valley somewhere in the Central Provinces.


The Indian Revolution, 1924
I am curious about the troops from the Dominions as in numbers & equipment. Australia could potentially have an issue with doing that because of the number of Irish folk (and the defendants there off ) OTL it was a factor when it came to the conscription vote
 
I am curious about the troops from the Dominions as in numbers & equipment. Australia could potentially have an issue with doing that because of the number of Irish folk (and the defendants there off ) OTL it was a factor when it came to the conscription vote
And Australia lost already much men on Great War. And now it is losing more for glory of the Empire and probably Britain is going lost this war too. I could see republicanism rising in prominence in Australia.
 
Given how divergant Nehru and Boise ended up, I wonder how long it takes before they turn on each other - not to mention the hindu/muslim conflict bound to prop up.
If the British wanted to be ruthless, they'd stir them up and mop up the rest: like give muslim protectorates/dominions in Pakistan and the east as well as Sikh or Jain autonomous zones, then offer one faction self rule if they subordinate to the Colonial government
For the Jains, might be a bit iffy; for the Sikhs, there's always Khalistan. As for the Muslims, you have mentioned it all already. But I still don't think, all this would do much damage to the nationalist cause, as the demands for a separate Muslim state weren't cohesive and noticeable enough at this point in time also, the Brits have managed to collectively piss off every single one of these religious denominations by subjecting them to the same humiliations and atrocities, all the while taking all, what is theirs, from them. So yeah, these autonomy distribution tactics are going to have much difficulty in working out, this time around.
 
No, what you have to understand is that quite a bit of those local princes were sheer opportunists, who would have jumped ship if not for certain cases. Mostly, their heirs were to be educated in England as a reward, which was a polite way of saying they were glorified hostages, and their heirs stuck in England were specimens for the British aristocrats to show off as if they were some of sort of prize collections. This was around the time of the East India Company till the Early years of British Raj (1830 - 1870). Later on, things became more civil, but the damage was done. These next generation rulers were rather mildly brainwashed from their education in England, which made them loyal to the British govt. Another form of control they used during the EIC was to play off each of these kingdoms against one other. Offer to protect Prince A from Prince B and Prince B from Prince A, at the same time. Then, sell them weapons and ask for taxes in return for protection. This was the earliest form of legalized protection rackets and debt-trapping, but nobody was smart enough to realize, and those who realized were too weak to do a damn thing.

But the true damage for their colony in India, in my opinion, was by the education system the British set up for their colonial subjects. When the Indian citizens became more educated, they realized what a bad hand they were being dealt, and that is what motivated them to start their movement for independence.

Well, I went off on a bit of a rant off-track, but for this story, it seems that the nationalists are winning support instead of the congress who were hardcore pacifists at the time, due to Gandhi's gargantuan influence. I Wonder how he will react to this turn of events?
I have no qualms in agreeing with you, because in effect I said the same, and you just expanded upon it by mentioning the mild brainwashing the heirs of the Princes in the 1870s have undergone in the course of their education in Britain; as these would be the people that would be the ruling Princes at this time, the same whom I am referring to.

About the education system, quite true; it has proven quite the curse to us in a way and a blessing in a few. I say this, because I am currently still within it.
 
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