Re-Shuffling the Stars: Super Mario Shuffle-Stars REDUX

Super Princess Toadstool (1992)
Super Princess Toadstool (1992)
Many Nintendo fans found it odd that out of the vast library of Nintendo handhelds, it was the Game Boy which neve recevied a proper mainline Mario title. Rather, the Game Boy hosted tons of games which became the kickstarter to spin-off series. One of these games was "Super Princess Toadstool", which unlike "Luigi's Mansion", was actually well received upon release despite many claiming "Luigi's Mansion" to be the stronger game as time passed. According to an interview with director Hiroji Kiyotake within the game's strategy guide, the development team wanted the game not to feel "bound by the conventions of the previous games", they wanted a game that felt unique and new. After Luigi, the next prominent Mario character outside of Mario himself was Princess Toadstool. Despite being the main damsel in distress, producer Gunpei Yokoi noticed the increasing popularity surrounding the character. It was soon decided that the next Game Boy title would star Princess Toadstool, a risky move considering "Luigi's Mansion" was a flop.

Production officially began in November 1991. Unlike Mario's games, the developers wanted a proper story, or at least one that resembled a storyline. Taking inspiration from Disney's "Beauty and the Beast" and "The Little Mermaid", the main storyline revolved around Toadstool taking out King Koopa herself when the Mushroom Kingdom is in trouble. Unlike Mario who goes on adventures to help others, Toadstool would regain something of her own. The areas Toadstool would traverse were all unique and distinctive, for one "Pachinko Zone" (1) was designed to resemble a robotic world. For the game's music, Kazumi Totaka took up the job to compose the score. "Totaka's Song", an easter egg song Totaka likes to hide in his games, played on the Game Over screen if the player waited long enough.

The Mario Bros are away on vacation back at Brooklyn. King Koopa catches wind of this and takes advantage by invading the Mushroom Kingdom, ultimately trying to kidnap Princess Toadstool without Mario's presence. With the help of a loyal Toad, Toadstool manages to escape through a cannon, landing in the faraway Vibe Island (2). Toadstool befriends the talking parasol Perry, Perry agrees to help Toadstool reclaim her homeland and travel through the various zones in Vibe Island before sailing back to the Mushroom Kingdom. Peach and Perry arrive at the Mushroom Kingdom and sneak into the castle, they then defeat King Koopa just in time for the Mario Bros to return and deal the finishing blow. The game's ending shows Peach, Perry and the Mario Bros enjoying tea together while King Koopa gets blasted away through the cannon.

"Super Princess Peach" released in Japan on October 21st 1992, November 2nd in the US, and November 28th everywhere else. The game was a hit upon release and many compared the game to "Luigi's Mansion", the similar gameplay to Mario's platformers was praised especially compared to the vastly different "Luigi's Mansion". Today, players and fans generally view "Luigi's Mansion" as the more innovative game, but "Super Princess Peach" is still viewed as a classic in its own right.

(1) An analogue to SML2's Mario Zone
(2) Designed like Mario Land from SML2
 
Super Princess Toadstool (1992)
Many Nintendo fans found it odd that out of the vast library of Nintendo handhelds, it was the Game Boy which neve recevied a proper mainline Mario title. Rather, the Game Boy hosted tons of games which became the kickstarter to spin-off series. One of these games was "Super Princess Toadstool", which unlike "Luigi's Mansion", was actually well received upon release despite many claiming "Luigi's Mansion" to be the stronger game as time passed. According to an interview with director Hiroji Kiyotake within the game's strategy guide, the development team wanted the game not to feel "bound by the conventions of the previous games", they wanted a game that felt unique and new. After Luigi, the next prominent Mario character outside of Mario himself was Princess Toadstool. Despite being the main damsel in distress, producer Gunpei Yokoi noticed the increasing popularity surrounding the character. It was soon decided that the next Game Boy title would star Princess Toadstool, a risky move considering "Luigi's Mansion" was a flop.

Production officially began in November 1991. Unlike Mario's games, the developers wanted a proper story, or at least one that resembled a storyline. Taking inspiration from Disney's "Beauty and the Beast" and "The Little Mermaid", the main storyline revolved around Toadstool taking out King Koopa herself when the Mushroom Kingdom is in trouble. Unlike Mario who goes on adventures to help others, Toadstool would regain something of her own. The areas Toadstool would traverse were all unique and distinctive, for one "Pachinko Zone" (1) was designed to resemble a robotic world. For the game's music, Kazumi Totaka took up the job to compose the score. "Totaka's Song", an easter egg song Totaka likes to hide in his games, played on the Game Over screen if the player waited long enough.

The Mario Bros are away on vacation back at Brooklyn. King Koopa catches wind of this and takes advantage by invading the Mushroom Kingdom, ultimately trying to kidnap Princess Toadstool without Mario's presence. With the help of a loyal Toad, Toadstool manages to escape through a cannon, landing in the faraway Vibe Island (2). Toadstool befriends the talking parasol Perry, Perry agrees to help Toadstool reclaim her homeland and travel through the various zones in Vibe Island before sailing back to the Mushroom Kingdom. Peach and Perry arrive at the Mushroom Kingdom and sneak into the castle, they then defeat King Koopa just in time for the Mario Bros to return and deal the finishing blow. The game's ending shows Peach, Perry and the Mario Bros enjoying tea together while King Koopa gets blasted away through the cannon.

"Super Princess Peach" released in Japan on October 21st 1992, November 2nd in the US, and November 28th everywhere else. The game was a hit upon release and many compared the game to "Luigi's Mansion", the similar gameplay to Mario's platformers was praised especially compared to the vastly different "Luigi's Mansion". Today, players and fans generally view "Luigi's Mansion" as the more innovative game, but "Super Princess Peach" is still viewed as a classic in its own right.

(1) An analogue to SML2's Mario Zone
(2) Designed like Mario Land from SML2
Impressive! So it’s like SML2, but with Peach as the main star.
 
I should return to TTL soon, the reason I haven't done so yet is because I've been shifting my focus lately to my other TLs, I might consider relugating this TL to a side project.
 
Super Mario Maker 2 (1992)
Super Mario Maker 2 (1992)
Not only was it pretty rare for a sequel to be the most well-remembered and beloved in a series, but it was unfathomable for a sequel to outlvie the original and become a huge success. Such was the case of "Super Mario Maker 2", the sequel which expanded upon the original Mario Maker in every way, in fact the original complaints of Mario Maker was what inspired the creation of a sequel in the first case. Now with proper hardware, save systems and level testing can be included as well as different modes and game themes. The fears that a standalone course creator would not be successful had largely been dropped, there was way more confidence that this new sequel could be as successful as the first game.

At its core, the game was just "Super Mario Maker for the SNES". It was all the extra modes and easter eggs that made the game stand out from its predecessor. Kazumi Totaka returned to compose the score, so it was only natural for "Totaka's Song" to be making an appearance, this time on the title screen. Speaking of the title screen, all the letters of the title are interactive, special effects (such as Mario shrinking when M is pressed) will be displayed. A stage creator was expectedly there, this time players could swap between a SMB, SMB2, SMB3 and SMO theme. The biggest highlights was ironically not the stage creator but rather the music and art creators, the art creator spawned the SNES Mouse accessory, allowing players to either color pre-made drawings or draw whatever they liked.

"Super Mario Maker 2" released on November 21st 1992 in Japan under the title "Mario Maker", the game was then released on April 3rd 1993 in the US and April 28th 1993 in Europe. The game was an overnight success, improving upon the original Mario Maker in every aspect. The SNES Mouse was so successful that it ended up supported in many other games, mostly third party. A remaster of both Mario Makers titled "The Mario Maker Collection" was released on the Nintendo Switch in 2019 (1), today "Super Mario Maker 2" is seen as one of Mario's greatest games outside of the mainline titles.

(1) Analogous to how SMM2 was released for the Switch in 2019 IOTL
 
Super Mario Maker 2 (1992)
Not only was it pretty rare for a sequel to be the most well-remembered and beloved in a series, but it was unfathomable for a sequel to outlvie the original and become a huge success. Such was the case of "Super Mario Maker 2", the sequel which expanded upon the original Mario Maker in every way, in fact the original complaints of Mario Maker was what inspired the creation of a sequel in the first case. Now with proper hardware, save systems and level testing can be included as well as different modes and game themes. The fears that a standalone course creator would not be successful had largely been dropped, there was way more confidence that this new sequel could be as successful as the first game.

At its core, the game was just "Super Mario Maker for the SNES". It was all the extra modes and easter eggs that made the game stand out from its predecessor. Kazumi Totaka returned to compose the score, so it was only natural for "Totaka's Song" to be making an appearance, this time on the title screen. Speaking of the title screen, all the letters of the title are interactive, special effects (such as Mario shrinking when M is pressed) will be displayed. A stage creator was expectedly there, this time players could swap between a SMB, SMB2, SMB3 and SMO theme. The biggest highlights was ironically not the stage creator but rather the music and art creators, the art creator spawned the SNES Mouse accessory, allowing players to either color pre-made drawings or draw whatever they liked.

"Super Mario Maker 2" released on November 21st 1992 in Japan under the title "Mario Maker", the game was then released on April 3rd 1993 in the US and April 28th 1993 in Europe. The game was an overnight success, improving upon the original Mario Maker in every aspect. The SNES Mouse was so successful that it ended up supported in many other games, mostly third party. A remaster of both Mario Makers titled "The Mario Maker Collection" was released on the Nintendo Switch in 2019 (1), today "Super Mario Maker 2" is seen as one of Mario's greatest games outside of the mainline titles.

(1) Analogous to how SMM2 was released for the Switch in 2019 IOTL
Wow! Excellent work!
 
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