Map Thread XXI

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A re-projection of Jean Lattre's 1762 world map.

Technical notes: Unlike previous reprojections of Renaissance/Early Modern maps, I used georeferencing rather than my previous "patchwork quilt" approach. This is a LOT faster and less laborious. However, a) I suspect the lines of latitude may need an extra step of adjustment; there is a noticeable seam where the latitude lines don't match up; I had to georeference the source image in two halves, as the system does not understand interrupted maps. b) There is a flaw in the final image just to the NE of Australia, so I may need to split the eastern hemisphere into two separate files for georeferencing. c) This map is just begging to have a bizarro Antarctica from another early modern map pasted in to the south.

View attachment 726047

View attachment 726048
There is a museum in Amsterdam called the Scheepvaartmuseum (roughly translated as the Maritime Museum, I think?) that had an exhibit back in 2012 that had a larger number of interactive historical globes like this that could be rotated and have any half of the globe projected onto a wall.

The exhibit may still be there; I don't remember if it was a temporary or permanent exhibit. But either way the Scheepvaartmuseum is worth checking out. They have some amazing interactives of both the Port of Amsterdam and a lot of things involving shipping containers.
 
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[50+ Likes] The Russo-Ukrainian conflict in context, by NeonHydroxide
hn5xaOg.jpg


Less than 80 years ago, Russia was considered the world's second greatest power and on track to become a Eurasian hegemon. It survived two brutal wars which stripped it of its most valuable and populous territory, three revolutions and two civil wars which devestated its remaining industrial heartland, and a smattering of coups and counter-coups which denied it the political stability it needed to recover.

Yet, by the early 1980s, there was still hope for Russia's future as a great power. The years of instability following the collapse of the Soviet Union gave way to a steady and somewhat liberal (if still overwhelmingly corrupt) government in Perm. New trade relations with China and the Central Asian states gave its economy a much-needed boost. Years of American support had rebuilt its army into an outwardly potent force. Most critically, the collapse of the German hegemony in eastern Europe paved the way to reunification with Moscow in 1981, giving the state new territories much richer and more developed than its Ural heartlands. Russia's leaders, symbolically re-situated in the former border city of Nizhny Novgorod, looked forwards to a new era where they could regain geopolitical influence by acting as a balancer between East and West.

But the government had made a critical mistake in assuming the ambivalent but open attitude in Berlin extended to its former puppet states in Eastern Europe. Especially in Kharkiv, East Europe's leaders saw the rapid collapse of the Muscovite state as a warning of the further expansion of Russian democratic influence into their own shaky regimes - and resolved to reverse it. In 1984, the Ukrainian army invaded Russia's Volga provinces under the thin cover of a Tatar insurgent army. In the months that followed, the Russian army performed shockingly poorly, taking large casualties and losing huge stocks of equipment in the face of the better-funded and more professional Ukrainian army. Eventually, under joint German and American pressure, the conflict was frozen through a peace agreement which left much of the southern Volga in Ukrainian hands.

Now, the largest Ukrainian mobilization in history has led Nizhny Novgorod and Washington to believe Kharkiv is on the brink of launching a full invasion to push Russia back behind the Volga for good. Despite eight years of investment and support from the West, the Russian army's problems with underfunding, corruption, and technological weakness are still rampant. The conflict, if it does come, will decide for good the fate of Russia's continued status as a great power.

A note: I made this for Reddit about a month ago, before the start of the war.
 
Rose, Tulips, and Liberty, by Unkown00
Rose Tulips and Freedom WorldA Map..png


A cover of WannabeeCartographie alternate history project, Roses, Tulips, & Liberty (link to the subreddit), set in an alternate timeline where the during the Second Anglo-Dutch War, the colony of New Netherlands would hold out against the English and successfully repels them, thus allowing the Dutch to continue their colonization of the Americas. Go check out the timeline, it's very good. Also, I apologize if some of the borders don't seem right.
 
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4mVaiN1.png

Nemesis: Map of the inhabited solar system. Around 299 ANC (After Nemesis Calendar)
Dark Blue: Empire of Galileo - Galileo is the biggest player in the system. Ruled by the emperors of house Zendell, Galileo is a sort of autocracy, but not much tyrannical.
Their fleets are found in every corner of the system, often in patrol missions against pirates of the belt.


Lunar League: The Lunar League is the other big guy. Luna is a democracy, although a flawed one. In fact Luna is pretty much controlled by the great zaibatsus, however the society is not militarized and opinions are not persecuted(well, mostly)

Vesta: Vesta was forced to choose a side during the Belt War. Its prince decided for Galileo, but people revolted, deposed the prince and proclaimed the republic that sided with Luna.


Pallas: The Principality of Pallas is a neutral state in a difficult position. Pirates are often a real danger for Pallas military, and help from one of the great power is costly in terms of political freedom and prestige.

Mercury: The first planet has a bunch of stations in its shadow cone. Those stations were built by religious organizations and financial institutes.
By the first days of the After Nemesis Calendar, Mercury stations(called collectively Hermes Concordat) are become a forum to settle international disputes and a place where to put safe money, the famous Solar Forum. The Red Sun, Red Crescent, Red Cross and other beneficent organizations are settled here.

Ceres: Ceres principality sided with Galileo when the belt war exploded nearly a century ago. Between the three states of the belt is the most populous, but it is reliant in every aspect from the Empire.


-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
I put on the map only colors and text.
The work belongs to the guy on reddit.
 
View attachment 726412

A cover of WannabeeCartographie alternate history project, Roses, Tulips, & Liberty (link to the subreddit), set in an alternate timeline where the during the Second Anglo-Dutch War, the colony of New Netherlands would hold out against the English and successfully repels them, thus allowing the Dutch to continue their colonization of the Americas. Go check out the timeline, its very good. Also, I apologize if some of the borders don't right.
This is great, thanks for posting it! I have a very incomplete version I was working on, but the borders on yours are much more presentable.
 
Go check out the timeline, it's very good.
I will!
It survived two brutal wars which stripped it of its most valuable and populous territory, three revolutions and two civil wars which devestated its remaining industrial heartland, and a smattering of coups and counter-coups which denied it the political stability it needed to recover.
A very well made map. Three Revolutions is rather a lot isn't it?
Map of the inhabited solar system
We haven't had a solar system map in quite some time. Good to see another one.


I once tried (long ago) to map Britain's fears about Imperial, non-current, Russia on mapchart and then edit some arrows and labels in. Obviously the labels about France and especially Egypt do not represent my views; this map is not a comment on current events. It has enough inaccuracies that it belongs on this website anyway, (Suez Canal wasn't built in the early 1800s when this map is set; Russian influence pervaded Northern China, etc.) but I figured I'd post it and hopefully someone can get an idea for potential conflict points between Britain and Russia in the 1800s.
1647407702137.png
 
Go check out the timeline, it's very good.

Another amen here. One of the best graphical timelines I've ever seen.

I once tried (long ago) to map Britain's fears about Imperial, non-current, Russia on mapchart and then edit some arrows and labels in.

You know, outside Japan and the middle east, this is pretty close to the sphere of a somewhat more successful (Finland goes down, red Greece) early cold war Soviet Union: in an atomic-weapons-delayed timeline, south Korea and northern Japan could be on the menu, and an at least left-wing and Soviet-aligned Iran isn't implausible.
 
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Caliphate of Albion 1450, by Sārthākā
THE CENSUS OF 1450
VaDompk.png

A Followup of this map.

The English Crusades of 1301 - 1337 saw the loss of English territories in France, but the failure of the mainland Crusaders to properly invade England proper. Furthermore, the intended and stated goal of saving Ireland, Wales and Scotland from Islamic England failed horribly, as by the end of the Crusade, the remnant states in Wales had been completely annexed, and the Scottish Lowlands had been fully annexed. By 1347, the Scottish Incorporation saw the rump Scottish state ruled by pro-English statesmen ask for annexation to support the economy of the region. By 1400, England had fully annexed Ireland as well, and the next year, Sultan William III of England declared the Sultanate of England, Kingdom of Scotland, Emirate of Wales, and Amirate of Ireland were no longer in existence, as he declared the formation of the Caliphate of Albion - a Shia Islamic Caliphate. A second motion to crusade Albion was opened in Europe in 1404, but by this point, France no longer had the appetite to attempt a large scale naval invasion of England, especially considering the massive English naval buildup during the reign of Sultan Henry V, William III's father.

Societally, the English Crusades had an adverse effect on Christendom, as it pushed many Englishmen to embracing Ismaili Islam fully during the Crusade Era, and the refugees from mainland Europe only cemented islam on the continent even further. Islamization was followed through in Scotland and Ireland as well after their conquests, but was met with mixed results (though Scotland proved much harder than Ireland). One of the main reasons why Ireland was much more successful in islamization was because the English Conquest had led to severe amount of deaths in the Christian clergy, leading to a scarcity in christian structure in the post-conquest Ireland, allowing for the common people of Ireland to be more receptive of the English branch of Ismaili Islam, unlike the Scots who were more resistant to Islamization.

In 1448, Caliph John III ordered a complete honest religious census to take place on the isles, with the intention of gauging how 200 years of islam had gone on the isles. After two years of compilation and information gathering, the Census of 1450 was published, and is today considered to be one of - if not the - most accurate census's published in the late medieval/early modern period. With a population of around ~6.1 Million, the Albionese government found out that just above half of the population of the isles practised the English branch of Ismaili Shiite Islam.

Thoughts and Comments?
 
Even though the Italian Republic is home to a population of 15 million, making it the 2nd largest of Europe, it still has large pockets of abandoned or scarcely populated land, this due to geographical difficulties, fear of radiation, natural events such as earthquakes and others as well.

The coastal areas have seen an increase in population over the years, with an almost constant growth for many of the cities located in the Adriatic Sea, while on the Tyrrhenian Sea and in particular alongisde the coastline region of Lazio and Campania many cities were abandoned due to the fact of them being too close to radioactive places or being feared by outsiders as dangerous, only a few towns like Gaeta, Civitavecchia, Salerno and Latina saw a moderate increase over the years, due to their still large intact ports. Other inner regions like the Basilicata region saw an increase in population, mainly displaced people from Campania and Apulia, this increased the population of this region to what it was in the 1960s, this phenomenon happen for Calabria as well, who saw an increase in population, making it one of the largest regions in mainland Italy, together with Apulia, who saw too an increase in population in coastal areas.

Meanwhile, Sicily, the largest island by population is home to 4 and a half million inhabitants, the capital of the Italian Republic; Palermo it's located in Sicily and is one of the largest cities of Europe by population, being surpassed only by Belgrade, Stockholm, Berlin, Dublin, Zagreb and others as well.

The populaton of the 10th main cities of Italy are below:
Palermo - 827,301

Bari - 467,125

Catania - 450,210

Messina - 296,152

Reggio - 241,935

Salerno - 235,126

Perugia - 180,121

Ancona - 166,943

Pescara - 152,780

Lecce - 102,146View attachment 724790
What happened to the rest of Italy ?
 
hn5xaOg.jpg


Less than 80 years ago, Russia was considered the world's second greatest power and on track to become a Eurasian hegemon. It survived two brutal wars which stripped it of its most valuable and populous territory, three revolutions and two civil wars which devestated its remaining industrial heartland, and a smattering of coups and counter-coups which denied it the political stability it needed to recover.

Yet, by the early 1980s, there was still hope for Russia's future as a great power. The years of instability following the collapse of the Soviet Union gave way to a steady and somewhat liberal (if still overwhelmingly corrupt) government in Perm. New trade relations with China and the Central Asian states gave its economy a much-needed boost. Years of American support had rebuilt its army into an outwardly potent force. Most critically, the collapse of the German hegemony in eastern Europe paved the way to reunification with Moscow in 1981, giving the state new territories much richer and more developed than its Ural heartlands. Russia's leaders, symbolically re-situated in the former border city of Nizhny Novgorod, looked forwards to a new era where they could regain geopolitical influence by acting as a balancer between East and West.

But the government had made a critical mistake in assuming the ambivalent but open attitude in Berlin extended to its former puppet states in Eastern Europe. Especially in Kharkiv, East Europe's leaders saw the rapid collapse of the Muscovite state as a warning of the further expansion of Russian democratic influence into their own shaky regimes - and resolved to reverse it. In 1984, the Ukrainian army invaded Russia's Volga provinces under the thin cover of a Tatar insurgent army. In the months that followed, the Russian army performed shockingly poorly, taking large casualties and losing huge stocks of equipment in the face of the better-funded and more professional Ukrainian army. Eventually, under joint German and American pressure, the conflict was frozen through a peace agreement which left much of the southern Volga in Ukrainian hands.

Now, the largest Ukrainian mobilization in history has led Nizhny Novgorod and Washington to believe Kharkiv is on the brink of launching a full invasion to push Russia back behind the Volga for good. Despite eight years of investment and support from the West, the Russian army's problems with underfunding, corruption, and technological weakness are still rampant. The conflict, if it does come, will decide for good the fate of Russia's continued status as a great power.

A note: I made this for Reddit about a month ago, before the start of the war.
I would to commission you some stuff if I will have the money in the future!
 
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THE CENSUS OF 1450
VaDompk.png

A Followup of this map.

The English Crusades of 1301 - 1337 saw the loss of English territories in France, but the failure of the mainland Crusaders to properly invade England proper. Furthermore, the intended and stated goal of saving Ireland, Wales and Scotland from Islamic England failed horribly, as by the end of the Crusade, the remnant states in Wales had been completely annexed, and the Scottish Lowlands had been fully annexed. By 1347, the Scottish Incorporation saw the rump Scottish state ruled by pro-English statesmen ask for annexation to support the economy of the region. By 1400, England had fully annexed Ireland as well, and the next year, Sultan William III of England declared the Sultanate of England, Kingdom of Scotland, Emirate of Wales, and Amirate of Ireland were no longer in existence, as he declared the formation of the Caliphate of Albion - a Shia Islamic Caliphate. A second motion to crusade Albion was opened in Europe in 1404, but by this point, France no longer had the appetite to attempt a large scale naval invasion of England, especially considering the massive English naval buildup during the reign of Sultan Henry V, William III's father.

Societally, the English Crusades had an adverse effect on Christendom, as it pushed many Englishmen to embracing Ismaili Islam fully during the Crusade Era, and the refugees from mainland Europe only cemented islam on the continent even further. Islamization was followed through in Scotland and Ireland as well after their conquests, but was met with mixed results (though Scotland proved much harder than Ireland). One of the main reasons why Ireland was much more successful in islamization was because the English Conquest had led to severe amount of deaths in the Christian clergy, leading to a scarcity in christian structure in the post-conquest Ireland, allowing for the common people of Ireland to be more receptive of the English branch of Ismaili Islam, unlike the Scots who were more resistant to Islamization.

In 1448, Caliph John III ordered a complete honest religious census to take place on the isles, with the intention of gauging how 200 years of islam had gone on the isles. After two years of compilation and information gathering, the Census of 1450 was published, and is today considered to be one of - if not the - most accurate census's published in the late medieval/early modern period. With a population of around ~6.1 Million, the Albionese government found out that just above half of the population of the isles practised the English branch of Ismaili Shiite Islam.

Thoughts and Comments?
you went with Caliphate of Albion when al-Bion is rigt there
 
So, I decided to invert the colors of the hoi4 1936 map. (Had to post in 3 parts, otherwise size was too large.)
 

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