Eastern European flags using the same template, like Scandinavia:

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I loved it! Ideal to a surviving post-Soviet federated state.
 
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Flag of the United Republic of Ruthenia (Ukraine-Belarus). Adopted after Belarus and Ukraine unified in 2620s. Replaced by a Blue (for Russia), White (for Belarus) and Gold (for Ukraine) tricolour following unification with the Russian Republic in 2669. United Republic of Ruthenia later unified with the Zapadaslavian Federation in 2771, establishing the United Republic of North Slavia.
United Republic of North Slavia
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Which later united with the 2nd Yugoslav Federation in 2775 to form the United Republic of Panslavia. Panslavia would remain united and independent until annexation by the Venusian Empire following the 6th World War (2855-2857).
 
Morocco interests me immensely--from high, snow-capped Atlas mountains, to blue-painted villages, bustling markets and cities, vast deserts, and beautiful seaside views, the country is an interesting blend of Europe, Asia, and Africa, all in one. Indeed, Morocco's history since it's conquest by the Arabs has been intrinsically tied to these two separate continents. Although it is part of the "Arab World," Berbers, the indigenous people that have inhabited the area since Roman times, have, and continue to influence the country's course in history.

Europe, too, played a large role in Morocco's history--from the invasion of Al-Andalus in Spain, to the expelling of thousands of Spanish Moors into North Africa, to the subjugation of the Moroccan nation by the French and Spanish. Once, Morocco ruled a massive empire spanning from Gao in Mali to Zaragoza in Spain. It's territories became somewhat more limited thanks to the concentrated efforts of the Christian marches of Spain, and, later, the burgeoning Ottoman Empire.

During the most powerful periods of Morocco's history , it could stretch it's hand across the Maghreb and project it's power deep into West Africa, across the dunes of the Sahara. However, the last attempt at such an invasion was by Ahmad Al-Mansur of the Saadi Sultanate.

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The Saadi conquest of the Songhai Empire would look truly magnificent on modern maps: even Timbuktu was Moroccan for a brief span. The flag seen here is the original flag of the Saadi Sultanate.

The Saadis, though they claimed to be Arab, were actually Berbers. It's members claimed to be descendants of Muhammad, part of the wider Ahl al-Bayt. It rose to power during the mid-1500s, in a moment of pause for the Arab world--after centuries of advance into Spain, they had been fully defeated. Now, a powerful Islamic non-Arab nation, the Ottoman Empire, was making a rise in the Mashriq (eastern Islamic World). Yet the Saadis would never be conquered by that state. Instead, they would maintain their independence by way of a detente and even alliances with other European powers. Tensions with Spain, so common over the previous centuries, eased. The Ottoman Empire, who had conquered 70% of the Maghreb in one fell swoop, became a shared enemy. No longer could Morocco afford to be an adversary of Europe. Throughout the reign of the Saadis, they shared good relations with Spain. They also began to develop friendships with England and France. Portugal, with it's incessant invasion attempts along the Strait of Gibraltar, remained a fierce enemy.

The battle against the Ottomans was incredibly difficult. The Saadis lost much of their land in Algeria to them, and one of their Sultans was even assassinated on the orders of Suleiman the Magnificent. However, they maintained their independence thanks to their alliance-building with Europe. However, because of Spain's consistent import of gold from their colonies in the Americas, they began to worry about becoming monetarily irrelevant next to the giants of the Ottomans and Spanish. For this reason, Ahmad Al-Mansur tried to directly control the trans-Saharan gold trade-routes by invading the Songhai Empire of West Africa. This greatly enriched the empire with gold, but it turned out that such a wide area of desert was difficult to control, and Al-Mansur spent the rest of his days fighting successor states of the Songhai.

After Al-Mansur's death, the Saadi Sultanate collapsed into civil war. The decline of the Saadi state was not caused by incompetence on the part of the rulers. It was caused by this succession crisis, caused by infighting between Al-Mansur's sons and the Black Plague. Al-Mansur had a chosen successor, Muhammad Al-Mamun, but his sons disputed this after his death (which was also caused by the Black Plague).

However, in this alternate timeline, all of Al-Mamun's brothers die of the black plague, leaving a very sad but more successful Mamun. Without a major succession crisis and civil war, the Saadis continue their rule into modern times, in much the same process as the Alouites did (who have ruled Morocco after the collapse of Saadi power in 1666). However, the Saadis are more successful than the Alouites, managing to take advantage of the lapse in Ottoman power over the Maghreb by invading Algeria in the early 1800s. A more wealthy and successful Morocco is able to better fend off European attempts at influence during the Scramble, and although the Saadis become a nominal protectorate of France in 1912, they assert their independence during the 1st and 2nd World Wars, eventually gaining total independence in 1956. During WWII, they manage to completely fight off Fransisco Franco's invasion of Morrocco. A dispute between French-supported Mali and Morocco over the former conquests of Al-Mansur continues to this day, as well as heated territorial disputes between Algeria and Morocco.

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State Flag of the Saadi Sultanate of Morocco

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Civil Ensign of the Saadi Sultanate of Morocco

The Flag: The flag of Morocco, officially named the Saadi Sultanate of Morocco (and the only country to be named a Sultanate in the world), consists of the two dynastic colors of the Saadis--red and gold. Near the hoist lies a "pilllar" of three squares:

1. The first showing a scene of a seven-pointed stars over the Atlas Mountains of interior Morocco. The mountains represent the hardiness of the people and the beauty of Morocco, while seven-pointed star stands for the seven dynasties of Morocco: Abbasid, Idrisid, Almoravid, Almohad, Marinid, Wattasid, and Saadi.

2. The second shows the symbols contained within the royal banner of the Saadi Sultans, a large Rub el-Hizb (Islamic Star) from the original Saadi flag surrounded by four smaller Rub-el-Hizbs. Together, these symbols represent the five pillars of Islam.

3. The third square shows a golden crescent moon represents the Berbers of North Africa, and also Morocco's claim on Algeria's lands (the crescent is taken from the flag of Tlemcen, an early Algerian kingdom).

The main centerpiece of the flag is the giant Rub-el-Hizb, a new interpretation of the ancient Saadi dynastic symbol. It represents the modernization of Morocco and hope for the future. The four other Rub el-Hizbs mimic the royal standard of the Saadis, symbolizing the importance of the monarchy in the revival and resurrection of Morocco. The civil ensign simply takes the main portion of the flag and enlarges it.

Note: my brother was of great help when designing this flag, giving plentiful awesome advice on it's design.
 
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Something about the way the three banners are on the side of the flag reminds me of the infamous 2001-03 flag of Georgia (the US state). You did it more tastefully of course since the color scheme fits.
I guess I probably shouldn't have described them as "banners" in of in themselves--they are still part of the flag and not separated from it. In no way are any of these seperate flags on their own, as the royal standard of Morocco has a 1:2 and not a 1:1 proportion as shown on this flag. It's more like a collection of symbols. I was actually inspired by Kazakhstan's and Turkmenistan's flags. And obviously the first one isn't a banner, just a representation of the Atlas Mountains. That word was misleading, and I will change it. A better description would be "square."
 
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Inspired by GriffinFTW's Stolas Flag, I made a quick vexilloid of Hell.
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I chucked a few things together here and there. The apple (representing knowledge/original sin) is branded with the Sigil of Lucifer and is originally from the Krimulda Municipality coat of arms. The wreath is a heavily edited version of the Wikipedia representation of the 'Wreath of Service' from the Boy Scouts of America. The tassles are from the most popular reconstruction of the Derafsh Kaviani, also on Wikipedia. Overall, I went for both Roman and Persian influences.
 
For an Armageddon book series Falling Stars. About the slow fall of the United States and other nations around the world.

The Cover Art for Book One. Anti-immigrant fervor and prolonged wars in the Near East brings a new Independent President with only one course of action - bring the troops home to fight the "threat at home". A coordinated attack brings down the US Military across the world and allows immigrants to win their freedoms in the Southwest... or so they think.
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Additional Flags for promotion.
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Nevada should be here but there wasn't a Nevada in the online flag creator.
Falling Stars Book TWO -
With the fall of the United States, Israel becomes the target of a new Arab fervor as they try to eliminate it off the face of the Earth.
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Falling Stars Book FOUR
With the United States no longer the primary purchaser of Chinese goods, economic woes hit Zhongguo, but as the People's Party clamps down on the directed economy the Chinese people refuse to go backwards and revolt, bringing down the People's Republic and ushering in a new Era where China becomes the new Economic and Political Superpower
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Europe Falls as Individual Nations and becomes a European Socialist Republic.
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Falling Stars Book ONE Alternative
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Morocco interests me immensely--from high, snow-capped Atlas mountains, to blue-painted villages, bustling markets and cities, vast deserts, and beautiful seaside views, the country is an interesting blend of Europe, Asia, and Africa, all in one. Indeed, Morocco's history since it's conquest by the Arabs has been intrinsically tied to these two separate continents. Although it is part of the "Arab World," Berbers, the indigenous people that have inhabited the area since Roman times, have, and continue to influence the country's course in history.

Europe, too, played a large role in Morocco's history--from the invasion of Al-Andalus in Spain, to the expelling of thousands of Spanish Moors into North Africa, to the subjugation of the Moroccan nation by the French and Spanish. Once, Morocco ruled a massive empire spanning from Gao in Mali to Zaragoza in Spain. It's territories became somewhat more limited thanks to the concentrated efforts of the Christian marches of Spain, and, later, the burgeoning Ottoman Empire.


View attachment 752333
State Flag of the Saadi Sultanate of Morocco

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Civil Ensign of the Saadi Sultanate of Morocco

The Flag: The flag of Morocco, officially named the Saadi Sultanate of Morocco (and the only country to be named a Sultanate in the world), consists of the two dynastic colors of the Saadis--red and gold. Near the hoist lies a "pilllar" of three squares:

1. The first showing a scene of a seven-pointed stars over the Atlas Mountains of interior Morocco. The mountains represent the hardiness of the people and the beauty of Morocco, while seven-pointed star stands for the seven dynasties of Morocco: Abbasid, Idrisid, Almoravid, Almohad, Marinid, Wattasid, and Saadi.

2. The second shows the symbols contained within the royal banner of the Saadi Sultans, a large Rub el-Hizb (Islamic Star) from the original Saadi flag surrounded by four smaller Rub-el-Hizbs. Together, these symbols represent the five pillars of Islam.

3. The third square shows a golden crescent moon represents the Berbers of North Africa, and also Morocco's claim on Algeria's lands (the crescent is taken from the flag of Tlemcen, an early Algerian kingdom).

The main centerpiece of the flag is the giant Rub-el-Hizb, a new interpretation of the ancient Saadi dynastic symbol. It represents the modernization of Morocco and hope for the future. The four other Rub el-Hizbs mimic the royal standard of the Saadis, symbolizing the importance of the monarchy in the revival and resurrection of Morocco. The civil ensign simply takes the main portion of the flag and enlarges it.

Note: my brother was of great help when designing this flag, giving plentiful awesome advice on it's design.

I love Morocco myself. Heck, I find both Morocco and Portugal far more fascinating than Spain. Even when I knew nothing of the three, I just found Spain to be boring, and overrated, while Portugal and Morocco far cooler.

Morocco is in of itself an history book of the world, or at least of both Europe, and North Africa and is just so layer.

I really do love the flag and the flag of a successful and longer lasting Moroccan State/the revival and resurrection of Morocco. It so well-designed and so layer.

So hats off to you and your brother for the help he gave you.
 
During the 1960's-1980s most African nations became independent of their colonial masters. One of these nations, Upper Volta, was headed by Thomas Sankara, a Marxist soldier-turned-politician, who helped form the national identity of the country. He was an admirer of Castro, and as such ran his country like Castro did. His economic policies were questionable, and there were many abuses of human rights during his four-year tenure as President before his assassination.

On this subject, I made a flag for Burkina Faso ("Land of Incorruptible People"), if Thomas Sankara ruled longer. The Horse and spear is taken from Burkina Faso's coat of arms, while the red banner represents Marxism. The horse carrying the spear represents the will of the people to protect their country. The water the horse is standing in is the Volta River, the largest and most important river of Burkina Faso. The green represents the people and landscape of the country, which is predominantly tropical in nature.

The flag uses the three colors from the Pan-African Flag: Red, Green, and Black.

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In a world quite like our own, except Sardinia-Piedmont nabs Corsica after Napoleon collapses, the Italian side change in WWII goes much more smoothly, without a German occupation (mostly). Thus a still fairly fascist but sans-Mussolini Italy enters the Cold War. But this is still fascist Italy, and things go poorly. So poorly a Communist Revolution happens. The US wants to help, but with the rest of Europe still angry about the Axis, ultimately it proceeds. The Fascists flee to Corsica. The King fucks off to exile, but the die-hards declare an Italian State protected by American fleets. Brutal, repressive, prone to delusional statements about their power

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The People’s Republic of Italy quickly falls into Soviet Influence, and becomes a particularly nasty state. Secret police, repression. Famine. That sort of thing. Also gets a personality cult leader of some kind, which is always fun. That said, every dog has its day. Resistance grows bit by bit, and when the curtain crumbles mass protests happen. The government tried to stay on, but without Soviet support they lack the capacity to do so. A Romania style revolution hits, but in this case the leadership manage to flee to their one stronghold: Sardinia. The new Italian Federal Republic is declared, but are unable to project power that far. So the People’s Republic continues its brutal, if smaller, rule there.

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So now there are two exiled Italy’s, right across a narrow strait from each other. Constantly shooting at each other and chest thumping, partially in hopes of keeping their oppressed civilians in line. Meanwhile the Mainland government (who are either vile Communists or vile Fascists depending on who you ask) is just tired. So, so, tired.
 
But anyways, how do they all look? do any of them need some tweaking ?

All of them look solid design-wise. Some do look quite a lot like a few Latin American flags. One of them looks like Chile with different colors (freeflag288), and one of them looks a lot like Honduras (freeflag265). Was that intentional? One more thing: on Freeflag298, you may want to change the yellow to another color, as it does not contrast with the white very well.

However, always remember that as long as there is symbolism behind any of the colors they are totally good to keep. After all, flags aren't only about sheer recognizability and design--they are about the symbolism the creator puts behind them. Otherwise, I do really like the colors and I think that they would make great national flags, especially for a Latin American alternate history!
 
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