This is an overhaul of my previous alternate history scenario. I feel that alternate Napoleonic Victories suffer the same nostalgic unrealism that often plagues WW2 alternate histories. Much like Nazi Germany, France had no realistic chance of invading the British Isle, fully-subjugating Russia, or the like. This is my take on a realistic successful Napoleonic Scenario, with a simple Point of Divergence where-by the French Empire is able to survive Napoleon for at least a few decades (maybe more, I'm not fully done).

Europe: 1825
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Full Res Reddit Version:

https://www.reddit.com/r/imaginarymaps/comments/ouvjn4
Below is the heavily truncated summary of events to 1825. I welcome all variety of questions, advice, and feedback. While this is my pet project, it's an on-going one, I'm open to making changes if something is deemed to unrealistic (although I'll admit I made some choices just for fun). I will also be posting additional content for the next few weeks (more maps and lore).

(TLDR at bottom)

The point of divergence is that, in 1812, Napoleon decides to finish the Peninsular War in Iberia before invading Russia.

Russia, with no looming French Invasion, continues their war with the Ottomans. Russia secured the entire Danube Delta and Ottoman recognition of a tiny Serbian state. Ottoman decline accelerates from this prolonged war.

Napoleon still active, Britain refused to lift their embargo of American goods to continental Europe nor end impressment of American Citizens. The Burning of Washington, rather than encouraging a cessation of hostilities, was viewed by many Americans as an early 9/11. This, combined with General Jackson’s victory in the south, lead to a massive upsurge of moral and national hatred for the British, with British soldiers murdered in the streets by random Americans. The war dragged on until both exhausted sides agreed to status quo.

These years were no less strenuous for the French. What Napoleon expected would take one year took well over three. His military genius had little impact on Spanish guerrilla warfare. Napoleon trekked across Spain to reconquer territories that would slip back into enemy control sometime the day he left. Finally, however, Napoleon won, driving out the British and firmly stomping down on Spanish and Portuguese rebels.

Napoleon turned his sights to Russia in late 1816, but received an invitation from Greece. The Balkans, with wartime devastation, rising taxes, and successful breakaway of northern Serbia, faced mass agitation amongst Christians. Napoleon, intrigued with the possibility of seizing Ottoman Bosnia to form a friendly client state to apply pressure to Austria from the south, along with winning much needed clout among the philhellenic European aristocracy, agreed to aid the Greek Revolutionaries. After negotiations with the Ottomans failed, Napoleon declared war, diverting his army south.

Bosnians welcomed Napoleon’s arrival by ejecting ottoman garrisons and giving supplies. Terrified France would spark similar welcome everywhere on their march to Greece, the Ottomans felt forced to halt Napoleon's progress. The Ottomans met the French at Vares. Napoleon anticipated this desperate move and defeated them.

News of Vares spread, turning from a defeat to capture to annihilation, with French liberation of the entire Balkans imminent. Celebratory riots sprouted throughout the Balkans. The Ottomans, now with depleted garrisons, funds, and a demoralized army, were willing to part with Bosnia and Greece (IRL 1825 borders if the French withdrew.

In 1818 Napoleon once more turns his sights to Russia, and failed. Whether his declining health is due to the official diagnosis of stomach cancer, the culmination of stress and injuries he sustained in Spain, or if the British had succeeded in poisoning him, Napoleon would trust no one else to head the Russian Campaign, and he called it off. The last five years of his life in France were spent dictating his empire from a capital he left less and less often. The greatest general the world had ever known died in early 1823.

Napoleon dead, Prussia, Sweden, Austria, and Russia, with British backing, massed the 6th coalition to oust the Bonapartes from Europe once and for all. Their plan was a pincer movement. The Austrians would invade through Southern Germany while Prussia and Sweden would invade through northern Germany. Their hasty invasion proved miscalculated, however. Russia wasn’t given time to assemble their army. Napoleon was dead, but France still had its army, and its allies had no reason to rebel. The Austrians were halted outside Munich by Bavaria and the Prusso-Swede army was defeated at Frankfurt by the French.

The cracks in the French wall proved false, peace talks commenced. The result was the Peace of Paris. Napoleon’s son was technically Emperor, but he served the interests of the dominant cabal in French Politics, which sought to maintain a beneficial status quo, and discourage more coalitions. The key provisions thus were Switzerland was restored to pre-revolution borers and its neutrality respected. Stralsund was returned to Sweden. The continental system, a proven two-decade failure, was abolished. Austria, though it had broken three treaties with Napoleon, received part of its coastline back, in return for Slavonia. Finally, more radical elements of the Napoleonic Code were culled to dial down the “revolutionary” rhetoric used against France.

After finishing it’s international dealings, France looked inward. The abolition of the continental system made coast-occupation unnecessary. Napoleon’s brothers were restored to their kingdoms. France merged it’s Balkan holdings into an Illyrian Client state. Finally, Italy was reorganized into three easily manageable client kingdoms, with the Northern Kingdom of Italy in a direct personal Union with France.

Not everyone was happy, however. Britain refused any peace that didn’t return a balance of power to Europe (withdrawal from Spain, Germany, Italy, and the Low Countries) With no mainland allies, however, Britain could do nothing but continue an increasingly unpopular French blockade. Russia was unwilling to act alone, Sweden lacks the care, and Prussia and Austria are terrified of stated French repercussions should they break another peace treaty. Nor were the French People happy. The Bonapartes, looking more monarchical by the day, removed many rights in the Napoleonic Code in order to appease European Monarchies. In other words, France showed their neighbors they had no means of starting any more revolutions by killing their own. Regardless, by 1825 France remains King of the Continent.

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The question remains, however, without Napoleon, can they keep it?

TLDR:
Napoleon decides to finish up Peninsular War before Russian Invasion. Peninsular War, Russo-Turkish War, and War of 1812 all last much longer. Napoleon again delays to invade vulnerable Ottomans for land. Napoleon is struck down with stomach cancer and unable to invade Russia, dies in 1823. A hasty 6th coalition fails and relative status quo is kept.

Again, comments and feedback are welcome.
 
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Honestly haven't given it much thought. Until something better is suggested it's probably headed by one of Napoleon's generals.

Either way it's so distant from France and disconnected by sea (with British outposts right across the straight) that Greece, while giving some lip service to France, it's towes a neutral line.

It's a bit like the Switzerland of the Aegean. It's survival depends on not picking sides, but it's existence is mutually gurenteed by every single great power(hold the Ottomans, obviously), because of the nostalgia.
Is Greece a republic or a monarchy?
If a monarchy,under which dynasty?
 
This took WAY too long to make.

If you can, I highly recommend viewing the full resolution image here: https://www.reddit.com/r/imaginarymaps/comments/ozwajg

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Just the map:

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Here's the text in the boxes:


Lucien, The Armchair Revolutionary: The Jacobin black sheep of the dynasty, political differences, and pressure to divorce his wife drove Lucien to exile in Britain. He spent the 1810s criticizing his brother of betraying the revolution. Following Napoleon’s death, the Bonapartes thought this slander could damage their position in Europe. Portugal, lacking strategic value with its navy in exile, was the sacrificial lamb for Lucien to return to the mainland, and, more importantly, shut him up. A kingdom meant to appease Lucien and punish the Portuguese, “Lucian’s Playground”, is a hotbed for all manner of Lucien’s rapidly shifting ideological policies. Whether these caused the most recent economic contractions or if Portugal simply hasn’t fully recovered from the decade-long Peninsular War and loss of its colonies is unclear. Either way, the two certainly don’t go well together.

Joseph, King of (S)Pain. Joseph, or Jose I, is an exhausted man ruling an exhausted kingdom. Napoleon’s “gift” of Spain was a white elephant. The financial ruin from the decade-long Peninsular War compounded into bankruptcy following the loss of all Spain’s overseas colonies to independence revolts Joseph couldn't even address due to British Embargo. Joseph spends his days wracked with stress, his country barely afloat due to French garrisons and loans. While outright revolt had been sufficiently crushed, Spanish attitude towards their French king is hostile. Spain’s king is often found not in Madrid but in France-adjacent Barcelona, where he feels safer. Spain is a powder keg, with more powder added by the day. It is a matter of when, not if, the Spanish People will gain the will to fight again.

Jerome, The Dimeless Dual Monarch: Despite Jerome’s administrative and military talent, in part due to his excessive personal spending, and in part due to the ruinous continental system, his kingdom of Westphalia was bankrupted by 1812. Even with the abolition of the continental system, the damage done to Westphalia’s economy was not quick to reverse. To alleviate the country’s finances, formerly British Hanover was merged with Westphalia, granting it several wealthy cities and a solid tax-base. While technically only under a “personal union” with Westphalia under the assumption of returning the land to the British should they ever normalize relations, the two operate as one state. It is still to be seen whether Hannover will be the buoy Westphalia needs, or be dragged down with the sinking ship.

Luis Bonaparte, The Rabbit of Holland: Luis Bonaparte, Napoleon’s younger brother, was driven out of his kingdom in 1810 for disobeying his brother’s orders in favor of the interests of the Dutch. Following Napoleon’s death, the former King of Holland was restored to his kingdom. He has learned Dutch and has otherwise shown genuine care for the people he rules over. Largely spared the stresses experienced by his family, Luis enjoys popular support of his subjects. Although a bit eccentric, having changed his capital over two dozen times on a whim, and stubbornly independent, his family are content in knowing he is a staunch French ally. His family doesn’t care that he changed his first name to the Dutch equivalent, Lodewijk, so long as he keeps the last name “Bonaparte.”

Napoleon II, L’Aiglon: The year is 1827 and French control stretches from Lisbon to Lublin. Napoleon II, L'aiglon (The Eaglet), following the end of his regency on his 16th birthday was officially crowned Emperor of the French and King of Italy in 1827. The young family Patriarch has proven to be his father’s son, possessing a quick mind for war and diplomacy. The risk of a 7th coalition was allayed when L'aiglon reaffirmed his alliance with Prussia and France, through a very detailed explanation of what would be done should they break another treaty with France. Despite his successes, while the heirs of empire builders were often pressured to out-do their progenitors, Napoleon II is pressed to keep what he has gained. Unrest in the Rhineland is the least of his concerns. His uncle’s kingdoms range from useless to liability. France’s other allies and clients are loyal, but may not be enough. France is engaged in a cold war with Britain. Pressure from Russia, regarding the Duchy of Warsaw, a valuable French ally, may soon turn that war hot.
 
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I like it... in fact in some ways it's a bit close to something I'm considering in my long-threatened-but-nowhere-near-fleshed-out TL :) (don't worry, for mine western Europe will be more of a side dish than the main course, and Nap's not dead... just on a bit of an ummm... enforced vacation ;)
One (tiny little) thing I should point out though - there's a long-standing trope on here about Switzerland being somehow mystically inviolable :p - it's right up there with the eternal northern border of Kazakhstan :)
Prior to OTL CoV, Valais would've been a French department,
 
I like it... in fact in some ways it's a bit close to something I'm considering in my long-threatened-but-nowhere-near-fleshed-out TL :) (don't worry, for mine western Europe will be more of a side dish than the main course, and Nap's not dead... just on a bit of an ummm... enforced vacation ;)
One (tiny little) thing I should point out though - there's a long-standing trope on here about Switzerland being somehow mystically inviolable :p - it's right up there with the eternal northern border of Kazakhstan :)
Prior to OTL CoV, Valais would've been a French department,
Whoops posted that before I was finished :p the AH equivalent of butt-dialing :)
To continue... Geneva was French, Neuchatel was French (under Berthier), and the north of Berne (now Jura) was a bit different, mostly attached to Haut-Rhine ie southern Alsace...
Other than that, I love the work, and am looking forward to seeing where it goes!
 
One (tiny little) thing I should point out though - there's a long-standing trope on here about Switzerland being somehow mystically inviolable :p - it's right up there with the eternal northern border of Kazakhstan :)
Prior to OTL CoV, Valais would've been a French department,
That's a great point to bring up. I spent over an hour trying to figure out what to do with Switzerland. While a balkanized Switzerland among France, the Confederation of the Rhine, and Italy, I felt I wasn't justified in doing so. To my knowledge, no part of Switzerland liked being a part of France, and one of the main grievances of Great Britain against France was it's disrespecting of Swiss Neutrality (a staple of Europe for 200 years). Given Switzerland loses it's strategic use if one controls the entire alps around it, and that its people, unlike the Italians and Germans under direct French control, never truly accepted French Rule, I thought it might make sense that, following Napoleon's death, his son and other cooler heads release Switzerland both to free up garrison troops for more strategic locations and to try and calm European tension a bit.

I do imagine there being a secret treaty between Napoleonic Europe and Neutral Switzerland where-by the Swiss must shelter and hide any Bonaparte who is ousted from their kingdom. Thus making the "neutral" territory one where Bonaparte's can flee to without fear of extradition to a hostile power.

Does this seem reasonable? If not, I'm open to persuasion on the contrary.
 
That's a great point to bring up. I spent over an hour trying to figure out what to do with Switzerland. While a balkanized Switzerland among France, the Confederation of the Rhine, and Italy, I felt I wasn't justified in doing so. To my knowledge, no part of Switzerland liked being a part of France, and one of the main grievances of Great Britain against France was it's disrespecting of Swiss Neutrality (a staple of Europe for 200 years). Given Switzerland loses it's strategic use if one controls the entire alps around it, and that its people, unlike the Italians and Germans under direct French control, never truly accepted French Rule, I thought it might make sense that, following Napoleon's death, his son and other cooler heads release Switzerland both to free up garrison troops for more strategic locations and to try and calm European tension a bit.

I do imagine there being a secret treaty between Napoleonic Europe and Neutral Switzerland where-by the Swiss must shelter and hide any Bonaparte who is ousted from their kingdom. Thus making the "neutral" territory one where Bonaparte's can flee to without fear of extradition to a hostile power.

Does this seem reasonable? If not, I'm open to persuasion on the contrary.
Seems reasonable that Switzerland would revert to a neutral status... it's the borders, particularly in the west, that I think would be unlikely to exactly parallel the OTL borders. Prior to 1815, the borders of the Swiss cantons (both internal and external) were constantly in flux... also, there were certain strategic consideration for certain areas - Geneva (communications and transportation between "Old France" and the French Piedmont)... Valais (control of the Simplon Pass)... northern Berne/today's Jura (defense of the "Belfort Gap")...
 
Seems reasonable that Switzerland would revert to a neutral status... it's the borders, particularly in the west, that I think would be unlikely to exactly parallel the OTL borders. Prior to 1815, the borders of the Swiss cantons (both internal and external) were constantly in flux... also, there were certain strategic consideration for certain areas - Geneva (communications and transportation between "Old France" and the French Piedmont)... Valais (control of the Simplon Pass)... northern Berne/today's Jura (defense of the "Belfort Gap")...
All good points. But would securing those borders be necessary if France owned all the lands around it? Genuinely asking.

Also, would other nations recognize Swiss neutrality if significant pieces of it were missing?
 
All good points. But would securing those borders be necessary if France owned all the lands around it? Genuinely asking.

Also, would other nations recognize Swiss neutrality if significant pieces of it were missing?
Necessary? No, probably not :) Desirable? Probably, if you have one eye on the future and the possible conflicts thereof...

As to the second? Sure... the Old Swiss Confederation didn't include, or only loosely included, quite a few peripheral areas that are within the borders of Switzerland today... (map of situation in 1789)
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Necessary? No, probably not :) Desirable? Probably, if you have one eye on the future and the possible conflicts thereof...

As to the second? Sure... the Old Swiss Confederation didn't include, or only loosely included, quite a few peripheral areas that are within the borders of Switzerland today... (map of situation in 1789)
That is a really good point. Sure. I can give France those areas.

Though that said, since you know a bit more about this than I do, would you justify partitioning Switzerland between France and her allies? Like if France took the Western Half right down the middle to have a more defendable border? Or would that be unrealistic?
 
That is a really good point. Sure. I can give France those areas.

Though that said, since you know a bit more about this than I do, would you justify partitioning Switzerland between France and her allies? Like if France took the Western Half right down the middle to have a more defendable border? Or would that be unrealistic?
Ha! I am by no means an expert in Swiss history :p all I know about it, is that it was a confusing (and violent!) place before 1815... no wonder there were so many Swiss mercenaries running around, they got plenty of experience, especially during and after the Reformation...
Only reason I'm chiming in is that I've been trying to figure out what to do with the Helvetic Republic/Confederation (and the Rheinbund, and Italy...) myself, and also thought if I didn't point out the "Eternal Switzerland" thing, someone else would :)
A full partition though, I don't think would be well-received by the Coalition powers, or by the populace... as much as the Swiss fought against each other, they could put their differences aside when it came to domination by foreign powers - whether those powers were their "co-linguists" or not wouldn't matter...
 
Ha! I am by no means an expert in Swiss history :p all I know about it, is that it was a confusing (and violent!) place before 1815... no wonder there were so many Swiss mercenaries running around, they got plenty of experience, especially during and after the Reformation...
Only reason I'm chiming in is that I've been trying to figure out what to do with the Helvetic Republic/Confederation (and the Rheinbund, and Italy...) myself, and also thought if I didn't point out the "Eternal Switzerland" thing, someone else would :)
A full partition though, I don't think would be well-received by the Coalition powers, or by the populace... as much as the Swiss fought against each other, they could put their differences aside when it came to domination by foreign powers - whether those powers were their "co-linguists" or not wouldn't matter...
All good points. Ok.

Also, this is a general post, expect one new map + lore weekly. Usually on the weekends. Some retcons I'm making to the series so far based on commentary from this thread and my reddit posts.

1. Bits of Western Switzerland are annexed to France.
2. The Kingdom of Italy is not under a personal union but a client under Eugene, Napoleon's beloved adopted son.
3. Holland gains a little bit of northern Germany (seen in the Bonaparte map but not the main map) because I goofed.

If there's anything else people believe should be changed, feel free to mention it. I'm very open to suggestions. And thanks to everyone for commenting so far. I make these maps and lore because I love engaging with people about things I'm passionate about. The more comments I get, odds are the higher quality and quantity content I'll put out.
 
So I don't want people to think I carelessly skipped the date I promised for new maps. I am in the process of moving and am strapped for time and energy.

I will get at least 1 map and associated lore up by the end of the week, maybe 2.

Here's the plan for the next few maps and associated lore. If you have questions or comments or suggestions feel free to ask. This covers the next month.

- Threatened annexation of lands from Austria and Prussia should they betray France again.

-The Oriental Crisis (France forces Europe to accept Muhammad Ali's Egyptian Independence, guaranteeing future ottoman collapse)

- The Balkan Cake: a map showing planned spheres of influence in Balkans as decided in an 1880 Africa Partition form.

- How the Balkans actually turned out following French fuckery against Russia.
 
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I must say that don´t like Illyria. I think that there were reason I. provinces OTL looked like they did and not this way.
There may be conflict involving Terst and Istrian Italians, with portion of Adriatic coast Austria may (one day possibly) threaten French hegemony over Adriatic (and from Istria possibly Italy?) not to mention connection between them and British fleet... Croatia and Bosnia seems also hardly defendable for France.
For me more sense made take Austrians Istria, maybe Dalmatia or even OTL Illyrian provinces but leave them with inland Croatia and try to pull "Bismarck" - when they are engaged in SE Europe, they have less time for Germany and Italy and any alliance with Russia will be quite difficult (with Bosnia and Croatia in french hand this is less likely)
Or dismantle Austria completely and get rid of them
Looking forward to maps you mentioned
Edit: who rules in Illyria?
 
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I must say that don´t like Illyria. I think that there were reason I. provinces OTL looked like they did and not this way.
There may be conflict involving Terst and Istrian Italians, with portion of Adriatic coast Austria may (one day possibly) threaten French hegemony over Adriatic (and from Istria possibly Italy?) not to mention connection between them and British fleet... Croatia and Bosnia seems also hardly defendable for France.
For me more sense made take Austrians Istria, maybe Dalmatia or even OTL Illyrian provinces but leave them with inland Croatia and try to pull "Bismarck" - when they are engaged in SE Europe, they have less time for Germany and Italy and any alliance with Russia will be quite difficult (with Bosnia and Croatia in french hand this is less likely)
Or dismantle Austria completely and get rid of them
Looking forward to maps you mentioned
Edit: who rules in Illyria?
You bring up a lot of good points. Here's my thought process for how it currently is, to clear things up. If you still disagree I'm welcome to change some things around with more convincing.

When France beats back both armies in the 7th coalition they don't want the war to keep going. While Napoleon's allies have proven loyal for now, whether they will stay through more trying times like a prolonged war is not a risk the Empire wants to take so soon after Napoleon's death. Returning to Austria access to the sea was to ensure Austria agree to a peace deal to give all sides much needed time to re-organize after Napoleon's death.

In terms of security and connectivity of Illyria to the French Sphere, Austria is still *technically* allied to France. Military access is a guarantee. I guess I'm just under the impression that if Austria refuses to grant an army travelling from Italy to Illyria access, the French have a casus beli to divert the army north and take Vienna for breaking their alliance.

Illyria was formed as a buffer state against the Austrians. Any hostilities with France would mean Austria would be forced to divert a portion of their army to the south to fight and occupy a French ally, giving France time to organize and fend against a smaller Austrian force.

Again, I'm open to hear from you (and others) on this logic.
 
In hindsight I regret making this. It's frivilous and is a "what if" scenario in a "what if" scenario. I should have spent my time on the Oriental Crisis, something that is actually going to happen in this timeline. Alas, I'm a sucker for "what if" borders, even if I can't justify actually happening within my world and chews up far more hours than it should.

Full resolution image (I.E easier to read and easier on the eyes) here:

https://www.reddit.com/r/imaginarymaps/comments/p6imq1
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The blank map: (I always find the unnamed ones pleasing to look at in their own way).
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The text:

Prussia and Austria provided a much needed foothold deep within France’s sphere of influence during the Napoleonic Wars. Despite numerous broken treaties, Napoleon kept their punishments minimal. Napoleon II, witnessing both allies, including his grandfather blatantly join the 7th coalition before his father’s body was cold, has implied considerably less restraint.
Napoleon II, shocking his grandfather and Frederick William III, outlined punishment should Austria and Prussia again break their alliance.
The Confederation of the Rhine seizes Prussian territory for defensible river border along the Oder River. Austria’s Romanian majority territory would become a French client state, and their remaining coastline partitioned between Italy and Illyria. Austria and Prussia’s remaining Polish Majority land is merged with the Duchy of Warsaw to revive the Kingdom of Poland. Austria, having lost fully half its land in two decades, would be reduced to a second rate power near completely be surrounded by French client states. Prussia would be even worse off, the loss of its capital and largest city, would reduce them to a mere satellite of either the French or Russian Spheres.
Though the plan lacks practicality, with “Liberation” of Berlin reminds many French of the vicious Peninsular War, and Austria’s dismantling and official revival of Poland would antagonize Russia and Britain beyond ever accepting peace, “The Eaglet’s Carnage” has terrified both Frederick William III and Francis II into ejecting British diplomats and re-affirming their allegiance. With the threat of coalitions ended for now, Napoleon II turned his sights on a weakening Ottoman Empire...
 
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Ok, again me :D
I really don´t like OTL border between Hungary and Romania, I think that with pre-1914/18 PoD are highly unlikely (something akin infamous Kazakh borders)
What about Bukovina going to Dacia (it was originally Moldavian territory I think?), as well as Transylvania, while Crisana, Maramures and Banat (other regions lost by Hungary to Romania) staying in Austria? Or you can of course play with it a bit and split these territories acording non-otl borders or something...
On the other hand, your main focus is on something else
 
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