Another America: A Map and Graphic Setting

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Keperry, Apr 27, 2018.

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  1. Threadmarks: The German Confederation

    Keperry Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    [​IMG]

    Through two centuries of revolutions, wars both external and internal, and other upheavals that caused its membership to fluctuate severely through the years, the German Confederation has survived into the modern day evolving from its origins as a semi-feudal successor to the Holy Roman Empire into a modern political and economic union of German-speaking states headquartered in Frankfurt. Its seven full members share a number of political and cultural institutions and are joined together in a currency and customs union, while its five associate members (Bohemia, Carniola, and Banat with large German minorities, the former Prussian colony of Southwest Africa, distant but with a German majority, and reluctant-to-join Switzerland) are members of the Zollverein customs union without sharing the Bundsthaler currency. Some Confederal institutions also apply in the associate regions of Posen, formerly part of Prussia and now part of Poland, and Schleswig, part of Denmark, both of which have significant German populations. The Confederation also serves as an advisory power in the International Cities of Danzig (together with Prussia individually and Poland), Pressburg (together with Bohemia and Austria individually and Hungary), Trieste and Fiume (together with Carniola and Austria individually, Venice, Italy, and Croatia), and the International Zone of Amikejo (together with Rhineland individually, the Netherlands, Wallonia, and the Universal Esperanto Association). Despite occasional disagreements between its members, and accusations that it is just a mechanism for Prussia to dominate the rest, the German Confederation is largely considered a success and has inspired attempts to emulate it in other regions of Europe.

    (This does change the official borders of the world map, which will be changed to match... eventually)
     
  2. Threadmarks: Map of Southern Africa

    Keperry Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
    [​IMG]

    Here's a map of the alternately colonized southern half of Africa - greater/surviving-er empires for the Dutch, Portuguese, Germans and Spanish, less British colonization, no Belgium, and greater use of native protectorates all around - including maps of languages showing both the Bantu languages, by group where applicable, and European languages (the background color is the most-spoken official/national language and the squares indicate additional official/national languages) giving a picture of which European powers colonized what, and by ethnicity, showing which states have significant African majorities under African governments, both traditional monarchies that survived the colonial era as protectorates or were revived after it and republics newly formed after independence, the multiracial states of Angola and Kenya (the latter of which has a large Indian population in addition to the African natives and European settlers), the apartheid states of Transvaal and Mocambique, the surviving Portuguese colony in Cabinda, the Sultanate of Zanzibar dominated by its Arab and Indian minorities, and the settler states of Capeland and Southwest Africa, with European majorities and African and mixed-race minorities, and Griqualand, with a mixed-race majority.

    Fun(?) fact: in this timeline, talking about the "occupation of Gaza" refers to Mocambique. While recognized by the international community at large, Mocambique is not recognized by most African countries, who consider it to be illegally occupying the Republic of Gaza, homeland of the Tsonga people. (In contrast, due to the Unilateral Declaration of Independence by its white minority to avert a transition to minority rule, Transvaal is unrecognized and considered an illegal regime by almost the entire international community, including all of its neighbors except Mocambique.)
     
    Last edited: Feb 9, 2019
  3. TheKutKu Well-Known Member

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    Jan 3, 2016

    This is wonderful, so I guess here the european colonisation was less about annexing large part of land but more about influencing and allying local kingdoms in the hinterland, keeping their kingdoms and social organisation , although the former still happened on the coast, that always struck me as a more cost efficient way to colonize Africa. White minority rule stage today is scary, was Natal even colonize by the brits in the first place? Were they pushed out by zulus? Did any of the interior kingdom manage to pull itself out of poverty and reach some prosperity? Maybe Botswana? Is Katanga a puppet state of another country, or company, because of its natural ressources? How large exactly are the european (and Asian) minoriies in Angola, Kenya, mocambique and Transvaal, Closer to Rhodesia (<5% historically) or closer to South Africa (15-20% historically, 8% now)
     
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  4. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    In this timeline Natal the British never reached that far south and Natal was colonized by the Dutch, or more specifically the southern half was colonized by the Dutch and became part of the settler colony of Southeast Africa (though still with an overwhelming Zulu majority) while the northern half remained as the Zulu Kingdom under a Dutch protectorate; the southern half was ceded back to the Zulus during decolonization (the same also happened with the Xhosa and Sotho).

    Yeah I think foreign mining conglomerates would be very influential there, maybe Prussian due to its proximity to those former colonies since I doubt Portugal would still be able to exert much influence there, or hell maybe still Portuguese... maybe Canadian? There are other countries that would also be very rich in natural resources here of course, and as in OTL that would more often than not probably work out poorly for them - Lunda for example would be one of the world's largest producers of diamonds, and also rife for conflict between the Lunda and Chokwe ethnicities. I'm sure there are also countries that would manage to do well for themselves though I couldn't tell you which, Botswana seems like a good candidate for that thiugh.

    Based on absolutely nothing I'm gonna say Kenya is ~5% white and ~10% Indian, Angola is 5-10% white, Mocambique and Transvaal are 15-20% white.
     
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  5. Threadmarks: The Empire of Louisiana

    Keperry Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Mar 10, 2013
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    Louisiana was first settled as a French colony in 1699, with the capital of Nouvelle Orleans being founded in 1718. Lower Louisiana developed a plantation economy, importing large numbers of African slaves, while the economy of more sparsely settled Upper Louisiana revolved around the fur trade with indigenous peoples. Throughout the century France managed to hold on to Louisiana through a number colonial wars - one effect of these wars was the migration to Louisiana of a large number of Acadian settlers expelled by the British, who would become known as Cajuns and have a major influence on Louisiana’s culture.

    Louisiana first declared independence as a republic in the 1790s alongside the French Revolution, but after a few years and an unsuccessful attempt to unite its fellow revolutionary republic in Canada, Louisiana was occupied and the First Republic was overturned by French royalists (many of them part of an influx of planters and their slaves fleeing the Haitian Revolution) and placed under primarily Spanish occupation for the next two decades, leaving notable Caribbean and Spanish imprints on Louisianan culture. The royalist forces also attempted unsuccessfully to invade Canada in a series of clashes that defined the current border at the Mississippi River.

    Following the defeat of Napoleon and Bourbon restoration in 1815, the rival Orleanist claimant Louis-Philippe was exiled to Louisiana, where local elites, chafing under the occupation and inspired by the wave of revolutions and wars of independence sweeping across the Americas, invited him to take the Louisianan throne and declared independence as the Empire of Louisiana, which with Mexican and Canadian support won a brief war of independence against a Franco-Spanish coalition.

    The First Empire was dominated by the Creole planter elites (much to the chagrin of the Cajun yeomanry, not to mention their slaves) and particularly preoccupied with the issues of northward and westward expansion (successfully conquering Techas, by then mostly populated by Cajun settlers, from Mexico in the 1830s) and of slavery, which was the bedrock of the Louisianan economy but grew increasingly untenable as time went on and was gradually and fitfully abolished by the 1870s, with the liberally-inclined monarchy being one of the main drivers of abolitionism.

    In the 1880s Louisiana joined Canada and the United Provinces in fighting the British Empire. Louisiana fought primarily on the Great Plains and was victorious in fending off the British on that front (in recognition of which its Indian allies such as the Sioux were granted lasting autonomy) although it failed to press its claims extending to the Pacific coast. The war was highly expensive and something a fiasco, revealing the underequipped and unprepared state of the military, with a sense that the monarchy was reluctant to support the military, frustrating many officers. Soon after the war, these military officers joined with the planter elites still dissatisfied over the abolition of slavery in a military coup, forcing the Emperor to abdicate and establishing the Second Republic.

    The Second Republic was oligarchic in nature, dominated by planting and ranching (cattle drives having become prominent) interests and the military, and highly politically and economically unstable, especially in the 1920s as a result of the revolution in neighboring Florida. In 1928 the charismatic populist Hubert Long was elected president and quickly set about establishing a dictatorial regime with the support of the military. Long was skilled at appealing to and playing off all sides of the political spectrum and remains a controversial figure in Louisiana today, with his successes at economic development and establishing a welfare state weighed against his sometimes brutal suppression of dissent and democracy.

    Long was assassinated in 1961, ushering in the era of the Third Republic, defined by a power vacuum and resumed political and economic chaos as different factions fought over what the new Louisiana should look like - whether it should be a liberal republic, socialist republic, monarchy, or military regime, the role of the Church, the status of black and indigenous people, economic redistribution, foreign relations, and a myriad of other conflicts exacerbated significantly by the civil war in neighboring Virginia, the effects of which brought Louisiana to the brink of civil war in the May 1968 crisis as well as to the brink of war with Florida.

    During this time Henri d’Orleans, pretender to the imperial throne, emerged as a moderate unifying figure with appeal across the political figure. He is widely seen as pioneering the Grand Compromise of 1975: Henri would resume the throne as emperor in a democratic constitutional monarchy defined by federalism, racial equality, neoliberal economics, protection but not hegemony for the Catholic Church, and participation in North American integration. Thusly the Third Republic became the Second Empire. (Another effect of the new constitution was the quilt of autonomous native territories becoming united and formally organized as the Nations Indiennes.)

    Since the restoration of the monarchy Louisiana has enjoyed an economic boom fuelled largely by oil, bringing it to parity with the other nations of North America, although inequality remains a major issue with much of the new wealth concentrated in a few hands (corruption scandals are frequent). It is still more religiously pious than the rest of North America, with a large Catholic majority, although secularism is increasing and this tension has become a major social issue. Louisiana is also regarded as having a particularly rich and vibrant culture, based on a French, African, and indigenous base with influence from successive waves of Haitian, Spanish, German, Irish, Scandinavian, Italian, Mexican, Floridian, and Vietnamese immigrants, with its cuisine, music, festivals, and more being influential across the Americas and the world. Much of this energy has come from cultural revival movements among minorities - for the Creole language and Vodun religion among Afro-Louisianans, especially in the black-majority province of Yazous, and for native languages, religions, and customs among indigenous peoples, many of whom have been empowered by recent oil discoveries in their lands. Louisiana is a full member of the North American Community and widely considered to be a rising power within that bloc.

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    The imperial arms of Louisiana feature a pelican in her piety symbolizing Louisiana itself, three fleurs-de-lis under a white label representing the House of Orleans, a deer and bear as supporters to symbolize the vast and untamed wilderness of North America, a compartment of cotton representing the plantation economy, flags of Louisiana, a modified version of the Crown of Orleans, and the Order of the Holy Spirit.
     
  6. mikroraptor Well-Known Member

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    Oct 30, 2018
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    Eboracum Novum Province
    Why is Newfoundland Independent? Is it Acadian? Or maybe Irish (Based off the color on the maps)?
     
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  7. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Newfoundland is Irish, it was a British colony but with a predominantly Irish population that broke away as a bilingual English and Gaelic speaking republic.
     
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  8. Gabingston Well-Known Member

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    May 18, 2018
    Location:
    Minnesota
     
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  9. Cantra Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 24, 2018
    Location:
    An alternate Earth
    I wonder how these variations would have affected the world wars, and the general technology of the world.
     
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