Another America: A Map and Graphic Setting

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Keperry, Apr 27, 2018.

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  1. Threadmarks: The Confederation of Virginia

    Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    And here's a map of modern-day Virginia!

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    Virginia was founded as an English colony in the 17th century, and fought for and won its independence as the Commonwealth of Virginia towards the end of the 18th century. While nominally a democratic republic, the Commonwealth remained dominated by the white English planter elite at the expense of the poorer white majority (especially the Scotch-Irish descended settlers of the Appalachian backcountry) and the large minority of African-descended slaves even after the extension of universal manhood suffrage to whites and abolition of slavery in the mid-19th century. These divisions were inflamed by the 1921 Populist Revolution in Florida which provoked a backlash in Virginia as the elite sought to hold on to power while disenfranchised populations, particularly Afro-Virginians and Appalachians, agitated for a more egalitarian society.

    These divisions culminated in the bloody Virginian Civil War of 1964-1972, which eventually saw the communist rebellion of the Worker's Army in Appalachia and the right-wing Provisional Government established by military coup to confront it defeated by an alliance of the neoliberal Coalition to Restore Democracy and separatist Gullah Liberation Army with international assistance. The postwar Constitution of 1976 ended the Commonwealth of Virginia and in its place established the new Confederation of Virginia, characterized by increased federalism, egalitarianism, and civilian control of the military, autonomy for the Gullah Free State, and participation in the North American integration process culminating in Virginia's accession to the North American Community in 1994.

    In the aftermath of the civil war, Virginia's current stability and democracy are applauded as a success story, although deep fractures along racial, regional, and class lines remain and it continues to lag behind the rest of North America in many social and economic indicators. Despite its relative lack of economic clout, its culture (based on the blending of Anglo-Celtic and West African influences) has become quite influential across the rest of the continent in areas such as music, literature, and cuisine, to a significant degree because of the large Virginian diaspora (which saw its largest growth due to the war although many emigrated both before and after for economic and political reasons).
     
  2. Gian Wizard of Watkins Mill

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    Feb 17, 2012
    Location:
    'Murica (do you have to ask?)
    I would love to see New England (and the fate of the Acadians)
     
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  3. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    New England is one of the areas mostly similar to OTL in cartographic terms at least but I might get around to it!

    The Acadian Expulsion occurred as in OTL so there are Cajuns in Louisiana where they make up a major part of the culture, especially in Nouvelle-Acadie (OTL Louisiana) which is named after them and Techas. There's also a remaining population of Acadians in New England; the Acadian Movement of the 60s-90s (an offshoot of the broader Catholic Civil Rights Movement of the 50s-60s, and in conjunction of the Gaelic Movement in Nova Scotia which saw Scottish Gaelic elevated to an official language there) called for language and regional rights in its more moderate form and for secession from New England and union with Canada in its more extreme form, sometimes escalated to violence, and resulted in the creation of an autonomous region of Acadia out of Francophone majority parts of New Brunswick and Maine.
     
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  4. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 6, 2014
    I live in the city of Adelaide in South Australia, so which country controls that region?
     
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  5. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Adelaide is Baudinville, capital of Napolia.
     
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  6. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 6, 2014
    Can you please do a write up about Australia?
     
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  7. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    I’m actually working on a map of Australia, will include a writeup with it!
     
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  8. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    Oct 6, 2014
    What's happen to Hawaii?
     
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  9. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Hawaii was never fully colonized or annexed, though it was a British protectorate for a while; today it’s an independent constitutional monarchy with an indigenous majority and substantial European and Asian minorities and with Hawaiian and English as official languages. It’s mostly considered part of Oceania (where it’s a regional leader, as one of the larger countries) rather than part of North America, although it does have strong ties with Columbia and California.
     
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  10. Threadmarks: Map of Australia

    Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    And here's Australia!

    [​IMG]

    The continent of Australia has been inhabited for tens of thousands of years but began to take its current shape in the 17th century when New Holland was discovered and named by Dutch navigators. Coastal outposts were established to protect the sea route to the Dutch East Indies while active settlement and colonization efforts on the west coast began in the late 18th century along with and in response to the British who established the penal colony of New Wales on the east coast and the French who colonized Terre Napoleon and Ile Dufresne (previously named Diemensland by the Dutch). The settler population of all three colonies grew steadily through the 19th century, aided by several gold rushes (while the indigenous population steadily declined).

    Terre Napoleon was the first to become independent, breaking free from France during one of the latter’s many changes of government during the late 19th century and rechristening itself as the Republic of Napolia. Around the turn of the 20th century, the several British colonies united into the rather presumptuously named (much to the rest of the continent’s annoyance even to this day) federation of Australia as a British dominion while New Holland became a full constituent country of the crown of the Netherlands. Several decades later New Holland voted to become an independent republic, while Australia remains a Commonwealth realm sharing the British monarchy to this day.

    New Holland and Napolia have similar population sizes while Australia has over twice that. All three countries have European majorities and smaller Aboriginal minorities; New Holland also has a substantial Indonesian population (forming pluralities in some of the northern provinces where Javanese is a co-official language) while Australia has East Asian and Pacific Islander immigrant minorities. The whole continent’s economy is substantially based on mining and agriculture (sheep in Australia, cattle in New Holland, wine in Napolia, wheat everywhere) as well as manufacturing. The main financial and cultural centers are Port Jackson, Batmania, Zwanenstad, Baudinville, and Peyroux.
     
  11. TheKutKu Well-Known Member

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    Jan 3, 2016

    Awesome! Great map as always!

    Just a question, you said that New Holland and Napolia have more or less the same population while Australia has more than twice each's. IRL the territories of Napolia and New Holland have more or less the same population - between 2-3 millions, but IRL the territories of Australia (ittl) have nearly 4 times the population of both. So, is australia less populated than its territories IRL? What's a rough estimate of the population of the continent? I guess that Napolia and New Holland are more populated than their IRL counterparts.
     
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  12. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Yeah now that you mention it those numbers should probably be tweaked so that TTL Australia has like three or four times the population of Napolia or New Holland, the latter two areas are supposed to be more populous than OTL but I guess there's only so much bigger they can get while still being reasonable...

    Ley's say around 5-6 million each for New Holland and Napolia and 18-20 million for Australia.
     
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  13. Arcvalons The internationale unites the world in song.

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    Location:
    Sozialistische Weltrepublik
    What base maps do you use?
     
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  14. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    I tend to just use whatever I can scrounge up with a Google search, I don't have any one source of maps in particular.
     
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  15. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Updated the world map with Napolia and also split up New Zealand, the North Island is still Aotearoa (Maori) while the South Island is now New Munster (British).
     
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  16. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    [​IMG]

    Changes in Southeast Asia: added Kawthoolei, Champa, and Tailand (Sip Song Chau Tai), merged Chin and Mizoram into Zogam, split Mindanao between the Philippines and Sulu, merged Guangxi back into China.
     
  17. Threadmarks: Map of the United Kingdom

    Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    [​IMG]

    Here's a map of the United Kingdom, which in this timeline is a federation of its four OTL countries plus Cornwall, the Isle of Man, and the Channel Islands (the latter two of which are now fully integrated parts of the UK rather than Crown Dependencies). While sharing a common monarchy and parliament at Westminster, each of its constituent states has its own parliament and ceremonial monarchy (eg, in Cornwall the monarch is simultaneously Duke/Duchess of Cornwall and King/Queen of the United Kingdom, and so on for the other states; however in Ulster the monarch is considered to be King of Ireland rather than Earl and in the Channel Islands the monarch is considered to be Duke of Normandy rather than Bailiff since those states are considered to be part of the Kingdom of Ireland and Duchy of Normandy respectively even though they're the only parts of those realms still in the UK). English is still the majority spoken language in every constituent country but their local native languages are a good deal more widely spoken than in OTL, with Gaelic and Welsh in particular benefiting from sharing a language with countries in the Americas.
     
  18. Threadmarks: The Middle East

    Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    And while I'm posting things, I've retroactively decided that the map I made of the Middle East is part of this timeline too (which doesn't *really* make sense with any POD long before WW1 but I'm already standing atop a mountain of dead butterflies so whatever), so here it is!

    [​IMG]

    The Ottoman Empire fell to nationalist revolutions by the Armenians, Kurds, Greeks, and Arabs; in the latter case Britain and France agreed to recognize the new monarchy of Hashemite Arabia, located in land they had been intending to colonize, in exchange for its ceding the territories along its Mediterranean coast as zones of influence and homelands for religious minorities - including one for the Jews, thus allowing Jewish migration and statehood to occur relatively peacefully. With no real Arab-Israeli conflict, less of a feeling of betrayal or anger at the West, and a strong Arab nation-state existing in the form of Hashemite Arabia, Nasser-style left-wing Arab nationalism never really took off, resulting in less internal political conflict in Arab countries and more Arab monarchies remaining in place.

    A notable exception is Iraq, originally carved out by the British as a protectorate and granted to the Sunni al-Sabah dynasty of Kuwait who ruled over the Shia majority. Sectarian dissatisfaction resulted in a revolution overthrowing the monarchy and replacing it with a theocratic Islamic Republic supervised by Shia clerics, which fought a series of wars with Iran, Nejd, and the Trucial States in which each side tried and failed to claim the other's territory (Shia-majority Bahrain and Arab-majority Khuzestan for Iraq, access to the gulf coast for Nejd) and to change the other's government (Iran to restore the Iraqi monarchy, Iraq to replace Iran's increasingly secular monarchy - and while this was unsuccessful the pressure of the war did result in the Shah accepting democratizing reforms and Iran becoming a properly constitutional monarchy). Iraq remained a pariah state for several decades although in recent years relations have mostly normalized and Iraq has been allowed to rejoin the Middle Eastern community.

    With the Saudis limited to Nejd, Wahhabism never became nearly as influential and religious extremism is much less widespread. On the other Ibadism has become more influential with the Imams of Oman retaining their independence from the Sultans of Muscat - and therefore retaining control over their oilfields. The Saudis' leading position on the Arabian peninsula has been taken by the Trucial States of Arabia, a fabulously wealthy league of oil-producing emirates such as Abu Dhabi and Qatar on the Gulf Coast, which exerts influence over the much poorer monarchies to its south and east. The Federation of South Arabia - essentially Aden and its hinterland - maintains strong ties with Britain.

    Israel and Lebanon have likewise maintained strong ties to their former protectors in both Europe and Hashemite Arabia and are known for being diverse and prosperous democracies rather than being defined by conflict (Alawia has tended to lag slightly behind economically and has spent much of its time under strongman rule). Israel, despite tensions with the Arab minority, enjoys good relations with its neighbors (many of whom still have native Mizrahi Jewish populations). Due to the lack of a Palestinian refugee influx, Lebanon, while often chaotic, stayed just stable enough to avoid civil war and remain the "Paris of the Middle East". Hashemite Arabia has modernized and democratized in fits and starts and despite social, economic, and regional tensions through its history remains a center of the Arab and Islamic worlds, as the protector of the holy cities and self-proclaimed nation-state of the Arab people.

    The patchwork of nation-states to the north of the Arab lands spent much of the middle of the twentieth century fighting ethnic-inspired border wars against each other as well as civil wars against various insurgencies but have stabilized since then. Turkey is still the largest and strongest of them, but still quite a bit weaker than in OTL, and with the Kemalists having lost the War of Independence, Turkey has no particular history of Western-facing secular nationalism or European aspirations.

    Several areas are under international control, such as the International Straits Zone including Istanbul/Constantinople (smaller but more religiously and ethnically diverse than OTL) left over from the Ottoman collapse, the "corpus separatum" of the International City of Jerusalem (including Bethlehem) governed jointly by representatives of each of its three religions under international supervision, and the International Suez Canal Zone created as a result of the Sinai War between Egypt and Hashemite Arabia.
     
  19. TheKutKu Well-Known Member

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    Jan 3, 2016
    Very nice! Don’t worry, retconning older maps happens to everyone.
    Nice to see a stable Lebanon and that Wahhabism is limited. Assyria seems in a precarious situation geopolitically, did they have western help? Would also explain their relatively high development.

    Does turkey still claim all these remaining small states and the international zones? Did an extremist party took power as a result of the humiliation?

    Also why did you put “Baillage des îles d’la manche?” It should be “de la” manche, although it’s kinda hilarious this way.
     
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  20. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Yeah Assyria benefited from Western powers' favor due to a pro-Christian bias, also from its position as a buffer state between Kurdistan and Hashemite Arabia on land they would both want - neither of them could make a move on Assyria without starting a war with the other.

    Turkey has mostly given up on the idea of reclaiming any of the sovereign states on its borders, but does still claim the International Straits Zone due to its still having a slight-majority Turkish population (along with a substantial Greek population, so Greece also claims it, which is why it's stuck in limbo). Various hardline nationalist parties did come to power at various points but all of them failed to reclaim their lost territories too so they all faded away and things have mostly settled down by now, apart from continued nostalgic grumbling and the aforementioned competing claims on the Straits.

    It's meant to be Norman rather than standard French and according to Wikipedia that's what it is in Norman.
     
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