Another America: A Map and Graphic Setting

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by Keperry, Apr 27, 2018.

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  1. Threadmarks: Map of Southeast Asia

    Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    [​IMG]

    Mainland Southeast Asia, writeup TBD.
     
  2. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    What's China like?
     
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  3. CountofDooku Emperor of Amra

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    Empire of Amra
    Big Laos o_O ^^
     
  4. Cantra Well-Known Member

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    An alternate Earth
    Oh wow, that is quite nice.

    What is Australia like?
     
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  5. Keperry Well-Known Member

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  6. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    East Asia is my least developed area so far so this should be taken with many grains of salt, but the core of China proper is the Republic of China under (or formerly under?) a nationalistic and socialist-leaning but not fully communist Kuomintang regime in Nanjing. How developed and democratic is it today? Undecided! Manchuria is under the Qings, in the current version of things they're based in Beijing and still officially claim to be the legitimate government of all of China although I'm considering changing that and just having them be the Empire of Manchuria while giving Beijing to the ROC (maybe Manchuria is an ally of a still-imperial Japan? And maybe the rivalry between imperial Japan and republican China dominates Asian politics? Where does that leave Korea??? Stay tuned!). There are several cities on the coast outside of Chinese rule - Hong Kong under the British, Macau under the Portuguese, Guangzhouwan under the French, and Tsingtau under the Germans, while Shanghai, Tianjin, and Dalian form the Chinese International Settlements under international administration; the ROC claims all of them and they are a frequent diplomatic flashpoint. Mongolia (including Inner Mongolia), Uyghurstan, Tibet, and Yunnan are independent (in the current version there's also the independent state of Huijiang in Ningxia, Gansu, and Qinghai but I'm feeling inclined to fold it back into the ROC).
     
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  7. Cantra Well-Known Member

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    What do you use to make these maps? They are quite splendid.
     
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  8. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Inkscape, and thanks!
     
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  9. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Alright, here it is: Inkscape North America!

    [​IMG]

    (Take the GDP figures with a huge grain of salt each, and also the population figures really; ethnicity figures purposefully don't add up to 100% and "Mixed" includes Metis and Mestizo groups. Larger cities indicate a population of about a million or more; there's no minimum population for the smaller cities.)
     
    Last edited: Jun 12, 2019
  10. Gabingston Well-Known Member

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    You mistyped 2.9 Trillion for 2.9 Billion on Louisiana's GDP.
     
  11. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Fixed
     
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  12. terranova210486 Well-Known Member

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    What's California like?
     
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  13. Gabingston Well-Known Member

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    Thanks.
     
  14. Cantra Well-Known Member

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    What is the United Provinces like?
     
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  15. Threadmarks: Political Parties: The Northeast

    Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Many countries in North America follow an essentially three-party system (right/center/left, conservative/liberal/socialist, blue/yellow/red), with additional smaller parties catering to specific interests.

    New England
    Conservative Party: One of the two traditional parties of the Anglo-Protestant “Yankee” ascendancy, It supports stronger ties and identification with the Commonwealth and is skeptical of North American integration, though a split is emerging as some factions of the party have become more open to it. Fiscally conservative and aligned with big business interests by nature, though they seem to have accepted many of New England’s welfare programs as a fait accompli, and mostly liberal on a number of social issues such as gay rights and abortion, though taking a much harder line on issues resolving around preserving New England’s British-aligned and monarchic national identity.

    Liberal Party: The other party of the Yankee ascendancy, though tending to take a softer line on it than the Tories, and defined by social and economic liberalism. Strongly in favor of North American integration and also in favor of Commonwealth ties; bridging this divide has been tricky. Throughout much of the mid-20th century it seemed to be in terminal decline caught between the Tories and Labor, but its fortunes shifted with an influx of socially liberal and otherwise moderate Labor voters following the discord on the left in the 1980s, and it now contains both Yankees and Catholics.

    Labor Party: The left-wing party traditionally campaigning for socioeconomic equality for the working class and sociopolitical equality for Catholics, and traditionally supported by those two largely overlapping constituencies. After the Catholic Civil Rights Movement that had been uniting it largely succeeded in the ‘60s and ‘70s it faced tumultuous internal debates over social issues and North American integration through the turn of the millennium, causing it to lose many voters and almost splinter before it stabilized as socially liberal, open to bilingualism, pro-North American, and Commonwealth-skeptical but mostly disavowing explicit republicanism, allowing it to gain back ground both with its traditional Catholic base and with Yankees too far left for the Liberals but not far left enough for the Greens.
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    Unionist Party: A hard-right party associated with opposition to the Catholic movement, especially in the northern provinces. Its name refers to its support for stronger unions between New England’s provinces and opposition to separatism (particularly Acadian) and bilingualism, as well as its support for a stronger union with Britain and the Commonwealth; it is hostile to North American integration. It has religiously conservative Protestant elements (absorbing those dissatisfied with the Tories’ social liberalization) although they have diminished in recent years.

    Christian Democratic Party: The most Catholic party of the Catholic movement, formed as an offshoot of Labor by those unwilling to move left of the Church’s positions on gay rights, abortion, and the like. Socially conservative, economically leftist, anti-Commonwealth, and ambivalent on North America.

    Republican-Greens: A collection of far-left elements including the economically and socially leftmost faction of the Catholic movement, overlapping with the French and Gaelic language rights movements of the north, as well as Yankee leftist factions such as environmentalists and socialists. As the name suggests it favors New England cutting ties with the Commonwealth and becoming a republic, though it’s tended to be skeptical of North American integration as well.


    United Provinces
    National Party: The right-wing party with its base among mostly rural Dutch-speaking white Protestants, favoring social and fiscal conservatism, ethno-linguistic nationalism including supremacy of the Dutch language and Protestant Christianity, and centralism over federalism. Was dominant during the 1970s but fell from grace due to its unpopular aggressive foreign policy, especially its support of the apartheid government in Transvaal and disastrous military intervention in Evenaar and Palmares, ushering in Social Democratic rule and the current era of multiculturalism. The received wisdom is that it was bound to fade away after this but it has instead enjoyed a revival in recent years based on populist opposition to immigration and North American integration while downplaying its previous religious streak.

    Liberal-Conservative Party: Traditionally associated with the urban bourgeois and supporting social and economic liberalism. A strong supporter of North American integration and the neoliberal consensus associated with it, while still holding out hope for a continued role for the United Provinces at the helm of the Dutch-speaking world, particularly through involvement in South America (as opposed to the NP which once held this position but has become more isolationist). Occupying a middle ground in the multiculturalism debate, favoring an inclusive civic nationalism over either Dutch ethno-nationalism or an outright multi-national model, tied in with federalist support for more powers for the provinces.

    Social Democratic Party: The left-wing party based in the urban working class, some educated elites, and ethnic and religious minorities and traditionally supporting social liberalism, the labor movement, and the welfare state. In recent decades it has become the standard-bearer for multiculturalism, envisioning the United Provinces as a country of many peoples, languages, and religions rather than a homogeneous nation-state and supporting policies like multilingualism and openness to immigration as a result, while somewhat paradoxically shying away from supporting provincial federalism or more outright autonomy for the provinces. One recent schism in the party has been between environmentalists and labor factions defending the coal industry.
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    Christian Democratic Party: An offshoot of the National Party that rebelled against the larger party’s downplaying of religion, farther to the left economically and farther to the right on social issues, particularly religious ones; unlike its counterparts in many North American countries it substantially includes both Catholics and Protestants rather than just one or the other.

    Party for New Sweden: A broad collection of those from across the political spectrum who desire more autonomy or outright independence, averaging out to populist social-democratic-leaning but with an anti-immigration tendency (on the grounds that immigration “dilutes the national character of New Sweden”). Its signature issues are support for provincial devolution and increased federalism, and Swedish language rights and protections.

    Longhouse Movement: The autonomist-and-separatist party of the Haudenosaunee, more coherently left-wing than New Sweden’s and with strong ties to North America’s broader indigenist movement. In addition to provincial devolution and Iroquois language rights the party is also concerned with land rights and environmentalism. Both separatist parties tend to form coalitions with each other despite their political differences as well as with whichever major party is willing to grant them concessions.

    Green Party: Your standard leftist environmentalist party, seemed to have been made obsolete by the Social Democrats but enjoying a new resurgence from Social Democrats dissatisfied with the coal unions’ continued grip on that party.


    Canada
    National Union
    : The descendant of constitutional monarchist factions such as the Feuillants and Orleanists, the party dropped its support for monarchism by the mid-19th century but continued to adopt other conservative positions, particularly anti-secularism and support for the Catholic Church, with the latter inspiring it to take a harder conservative line on social issues as well as a softer line on economic issues with greater openness to government involvement and redistribution, relative to other conservative parties in North America. Associated with rural interests and religious rural voters. Emphasizes ties to the Francophone world over North American integration and is split on the latter, with factions both for and against.

    Liberal Republican Party: The descendant of moderate republican factions such as the Girondins, and like them strongest among the secular urban bourgeoisie; sees itself and Canada as a whole as the inheritors of the French Revolution and its values moreso than the other parties. Based on this it has advocated for an active foreign policy positioning Canada as the leader of both North America and the Francophone world, for a middle-way social market economy, and for social liberalism including immigration and secularism, although more on the basis of individual religious freedom compared to the Radical Republicans’ more aggressive laicite.

    Radical Republican Party: Originally the descendant of radical liberal-republican factions, then became influenced by socialism and over time drifted into the position of the head party of Canada’s social democratic movement. Strongest among the urban working class and defined by its support for a welfare state and economic redistribution, and social liberalism, particularly anti-clericalism and support for French-style laicite, while being more skeptical of immigration (on the basis of its supposed challenge to social cohesion) and North American integration (on the basis of its neoliberalism).
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    Monarchist Union: The splinter of the National Union that remained monarchist after the 19th century, spent much of the 20th century in the political wilderness for lack of a compelling royal claimant but since the restoration of the monarchy in Louisiana in 1975 they have enjoyed a small resurgence, calling for Canada to be united with Louisiana under an Orleanist monarchy or else for an Orleanist cadet branch to take a new Canadian throne. They have often been seen as far-right and associated with ultranationalist and Catholic fundamentalist views but have lately taken pains to rebrand as a more moderate right-leaning populist party.

    Conservative Party: An attempt to create a more Anglophone-style conservative party - more secular and focused on free market economics than the National Union. So far it’s been much more popular with think tanks than with voters.

    Party for Indigenous Sovereignty: The Canadian manifestation of the indigenist political movement, focused on greater autonomy, self-determination, and land, language, and cultural rights for indigenous peoples as well as environmentalism and economic redistribution. Its greatest success so far has been convincing the government to carve out autonomous regions for the Inuit in Nunavik and the Cree in Eeyou Istchee, and it now seeks to repeat that with the Anishinaabe although this may prove much more difficult as the Anishinaabe homeland is much more centrally located and densely populated with white Canadians. The party has tended to have an ambivalent relationship with the Metis, often excluding them from its definition of indigenous people, but has lately devoted a lot of energy to trying to court them.

    Socialist Labor Party: An attempt to outflank the Radical Republicans from the left that briefly posed them a serious challenge in the 1970s before being beaten back down and persisting to this day as a radical fringe. Particularly associated with support for the Acadian insurgency in New England and often under law enforcement investigation for that reason.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2019
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  16. Threadmarks: National Symbols of North America

    Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    In theory this should be a wikibox of the national symbols of the countries of North America, if the resolution weren't unreadably bad for some reason? Ah well, enjoy squinting at this! Many of the coats of arms are placeholders and not the canon versions, not that I can make any of the details out anyway.
    [​IMG]
     
  17. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    Mar 10, 2013
    Updated the world map:

    -Japan is larger and now includes Ezo, Ryukyu, Taiwan, and Palau
    -China (ROC) is larger and now includes Huijiang and Beijing
    -The former Empire of China is correspondingly smaller and is now just Manchuria
    -No more Jewish Republic; added back to Russia
    -Australia is enlarged to include New Munster, South Papua, and Niue, and renamed Australasia
    -OTL West Papua now split off as the Dutch commonwealth realm of New Guinea
    -Lithuania is slightly smaller
    -Bohemia is larger and renamed Czechoslovakia
    -Carpathian Ruthenia is (de facto but not de jure) independent as Hungary's Kosovo
    -As a Dutch commonwealth realm, Cape Republic is now Capeland
     
  18. Hindustani Person Ambiguously Brown

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    Can we make contributions to this timeline?
     
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  19. Keperry Well-Known Member

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    It's not an open timeline but you can message me if you have ideas, I'd be happy to hear them.
     
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  20. Hindustani Person Ambiguously Brown

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    A place
    List of Grand Dukes of Alyeska
    Note: the last two images belong to the Government of the Russian Federation and Veni of Flickr

    upload_2019-8-15_14-37-2.jpeg
    upload_2019-8-15_15-13-4.jpeg
     
    Last edited: Aug 15, 2019 at 5:43 AM
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