Alt-History Aftermath Scenarios Implied by Media

Almost a folk religion and way of life rather than sport
For many people, particularly but not exclusively of L.A. it's a kind of religion, their passion, source of extreme happiness mixed/contrasted by ones of near unbearable anguish/sadness. You only have to look at how many boys across L. A. that were named Diego to honour the most famous one (for football lovers, of course)... But I think that this very short scene clip which its based in a known and old Rioplatense Spanish language saying would be perhaps the better example to help to represent it...

A guy[a big football fan] can change anything. His face, his home, his family, his girlfriend, his religion, his God. But there’s one thing he can’t change. He can’t change his passion [his Football team].

 
For many people, particularly but not exclusively of L.A. it's a kind of religion, their passion, source of extreme happiness mixed/contrasted by ones of near unbearable anguish/sadness. You only have to look at how many boys across L. A. that were named Diego to honour the most famous one (for football lovers, of course)... But I think that this very short scene clip which its based in a known and old Rioplatense Spanish language saying would be perhaps the better example to help to represent it...



And the club of a person is like it's tribe, with it's own history and values. It's even a family thing to some extent
 
By the way, talking about football...the series Inazuma Eleven is wild.
Is not exactly much alternate history (they travel in time in one part of the franchise for what I remember), but like, everything pretty much revolves around and is decided with football
 
By the way, talking about football...the series Inazuma Eleven is wild.
Is not exactly much alternate history (they travel in time in one part of the franchise for what I remember), but like, everything pretty much revolves around and is decided with football
Finally a world where Brazil is the Hyperpower!
Till Germany obliterates us in 2014
 
And the club of a person is like it's tribe, with it's own history and values. It's even a family thing to some extent
Indeed, to so extreme, that some people (either Mothers or Fathers),ask and are allowed or even stimulated to, join/make member of their Football club to their unborn sons/daughters with ultrasound pics used ias d photography for their membership cards photography.
But on topic...
What about Get Smart (both Film & Serie) with their own opposite Cold War Blocs leading nations alternates and independent intelligence agencies: KAOS and CONTROL...
Getsmart08.png
 
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The Korean drama Rookie Historian Goo Hae-ryung had
a Korean king of the Joseon dynasty attempt to bring Western science and philosophy into the nation, only to be overthrown by reactionaries in 1810. Several years later, a reform-minded king (who was also a romance novel writer) ascends to the throne. Female historians, which never happened IRL, exist (though they're new and small in number) with one being his lover.
 
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Thai Movie The Black Death 2015 is about Historical Zombie Outbreak during reign of King Mahachakkapat after first fall of Ayuttaya and zombie outbreak has implied to be from Spanish & Portuguese Ship that come to trade with Ayuttaya does it is implied that Europe has zombie apocalypse before it has come to Siam and some survivor are migrate to Siam
 
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Woah! I had no idea that was a thing (I've never seen that show), but I'm surprised no one's done a map or one-shot thing based on that.
A lot of spy fiction has geopolitical repercussions, come to think of it.
I mean a lot of it is that they went to great length to avoid using real places (exceptions occasionally made for Berlin and Washington DC) so there are lots of generic countries, but they also kept this up when they clearly had a specific country in mind. Hence there are like five separate "People's Republics" that the US is fighting the Cold War against, two Not-South Africas, one not-Saudi Arabia, etc.
 
i've been reading Oliver Twist lately and Dickens bringing up how the poor were treated in Victorian England made me think of something in the spirit of the season: could Ebenezer Scrooge's turn away from miserliness to all-loving kindness have had an effect on how Victorian law treated the poor? as in, beyond just becoming much nicer and more charitable as of the end of A Christmas Carol and making Cratchit his full business partner, also ensuring Tim's survival, would he have gone on to use his money and clout to advocate for the poor in general and get the laws changed to be more in their favor? i don't know enough about the Victorian legal system to judge that for myself just yet.
 
The Flashman Papers by George MacDonald Fraser and their existence present an interesting scenario as there aren't too many changes compared to OTL. The differences would be mainly academic and debates about his character and life (such as whether he was exaggerating his exploits).

- The existence of a state called the Duchy of Strackenz in Schleswig-Holstein and its annexation to Germany in 1848 might be the only major difference. Fraser's publication of Flashman's memoirs about this in 1970 might arouse some separatist feelings (or a desire to join Denmark) in the former duchy once the inhabitants find out what Bismarck and his henchmen were doing in Strackenz. There would also be a scandal over Flashman's suggestion that Rudi von Starnberg was the father of Duchess Irma's son.

- The 1842 retreat from Kabul might not be remembered in Britain as much of a defeat as it is in OTL given Flashman survived and 'led' the defence of Piper's Fort. After the publication of the first packet of papers, I imagine there will be a lot of revisionism about the retreat, siege, and Flashman's role. Sergeant Hudson would probably be given a posthumous award or statue as Flashman admitted in his memoirs that he (Flashman) stole all of the credit for the defence of Piper's Fort.

- As Flashman and the Tiger states, Sherlock Holmes and Dr Watson exist in this universe with all of their own adventures. I'd expect a few historians to look at Tiger Jack Moran (Colonel Moran) more sympathetically based upon what happened to him in Flashman and the Tiger and Flash for Freedom.

- One of the 'introductions' to the books has Fraser receive a letter from an American man who claimed to be a grandson of Flashman after the latter's encounter with a woman in New Orleans. Flashman himself hints that there is a descendant of his in Russia who is the son of a Russian noblewoman. Though, it's questionable whether this Russian Flashman's descendants would have survived the Soviet purges. Presumably, there would be many other claims of Flashman heritage as he was very lecherous. Whole Flashman societies could form based around his descendants.

- Flashman himself would go through various phases of historical reception. The books imply he falls into historical obscurity in the early 20th century. Fraser's publication of Flashman's memoirs apparently revive considerable interest in him. As he was involved in many of the major conflicts of the Victorian era, there would be a sort of 'Flashmania' for a time. It would take the form of historical debate about Flashman's life and whether he was really dishonourable. By the early 21st century, I can see Flashman fading again due to his racism and misogyny. If Flashman's American Civil War memoirs are published after Fraser's death, they might be censored to remove all of the racist language. He also might lose a few statues and street names in the aftermath of the 2020 George Floyd protests.
 
I've just finished Yakuza: Like A Dragon, the latest chapter of a video game series whose portrayal of the yakuza is so accurate, it got praised by some actual yakuza. If you ignore the ridiculous shit that goes on in the mini-games and side-missions, at least, or how the new protagonist, Ichiban Kasuga, is so into Dragon Quest, he sees street brawls as old school turn-based battles.

If the game's events took place in the real world...

Politicians using their ties to organized crime to advance their career is nothing new; the son of a yakuza boss stealing the identity of a dead person in order to pursue a career in politics, and going as far as to be elected governor of Tokyo while forcing the country's leading yakuza clans to disband after turning the tables on them, now that's wild. It'd probably be a scandal equal or greater than the cult scandal that hit South Korea's former PM. Also, this guy, Aoki Ryo/Arakawa Masato, found a way to deport several thousand Japanese residents without citizenship, up to and including zainichi born and raised in Japan since their grandparents' time - and it's implied that he held very uyoku dantai views, too.
 
Just watched RRR on Netflix. It ends with a 1930s Indian revolutionary who spent years infiltrating the Indian Army (and his best friend) assassinating the 'governor' (implied to be the Governor-General of India), blowing up the giant gubernatorial mansion, and stealing a bunch of Lee-Enfields to arm all of his revolutionary friends. What's more, he did this because the governor randomly kidnapped a little girl, which is presumably going to come out in the inquiries into this disaster.

There's going to be a gigantic political controversy in England about all this; not to mention the risk of violent insurrection in India.

On top of that, the fact that the Indian Army had a prominent infiltrator who used his position to steal a bunch of rifles for revolutionary purposes is definitely going to lead to the British Army trying to limit the number and influence of new Indian officers. Come WW2, the Indian Army is going to start with a massive officer shortage, before it begins trying to expand. Butterflies abound!

So Ram is pretty much a modern reincarnation of Rama, right. Like spiritually if not literally. He and Bheem are going to double handedly destroy the British Empire.

also, this really is alternate history

 

BrockSampson

Gone Fishin'
So Ram is pretty much a modern reincarnation of Rama, right. Like spiritually if not literally. He and Bheem are going to double handedly destroy the British Empire.

also, this really is alternate history

The British somehow have Brazil, Ethiopia, Libya, and Congo(?) but not New Zealand, Belize, South Africa, or Guyana. I guess the Scramble for Africa took some odd turns and God knows what happened with colonialism in the New World.
 
Speaking of Indian shows, I watched those two horror miniseries, Ghoul and Betaal.

In the former, India is a dictatorship with numerous black sites where dissidents are tortured and then executed. There’s also, as the name of the series implies, a shape shifting entity— the ghoul from Arabic mythology— which can be summoned and set to a task by carrying out a sacrifice to it. Given that the show ends with the lead actress preparing to summon the ghoul again, it is a creature which apparently can only be temporarily killed. There really isn’t mention of the outside world in the miniseries, but India going full on authoritarian would have repercussions both in the region and as far as how the superpowers of the US and China view it.

In the latter, while the fact that an elite Indian paramilitary unit was being bribed to carry our atrocities against innocent villagers so that
land developers could take their land would cause a massive scandal, it would be overshadowed by the fact that vast armies of undead British soldiers are attacking India as a inadvertent result of the main character’s actions.
 
Age of Empires IIII has some weird implications. The third act of the campaign has companies bidding for the contract to build the transcontinental railroad, while Simon Bolivar is fighting the Spanish. The U.S. Army also skirmishes with Mexicans, along the Rio Grande judging by the campaign map. The second act also had an Imperial Russian army marching to attack the Thirteen Colonies during the Seven Years War, across the Rockies, no less.
 
Age of Empires IIII has some weird implications. The third act of the campaign has companies bidding for the contract to build the transcontinental railroad, while Simon Bolivar is fighting the Spanish. The U.S. Army also skirmishes with Mexicans, along the Rio Grande judging by the campaign map. The second act also had an Imperial Russian army marching to attack the Thirteen Colonies during the Seven Years War, across the Rockies, no less.
Also the whole skirmish over the actual Fountain of Youth...
 
Also the whole skirmish over the actual Fountain of Youth...
The U.S. also lands troops in Cuba to finish off the Circle of Ossus at the end. That might not go over to well with Spain, to say the least. Speaking of which, a secret society obsessed with the Fountain of Youth (and possibly world conquest, their goals aren't very clear) has been manipulating events from behind the scenes the whole time.
 
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