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timelines:facts_and_figures_that_wacky_redhead

That Wacky Redhead : Facts and Figures

(This section will serve as a general repository for information pertinent to this timeline until it becomes large enough to be divided into relevant subpages.)


Ratings & Box Office

Top 30 TV Shows By Season

1967-68

#1

The Andy Griffith Show

1968-69

#1

Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

1969-70

#1

Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In (second consecutive season)

1970-71

#1

Marcus Welby, M.D.

1971-72

#1

Those Were the Days

1972-73

#1

Those Were the Days (second consecutive season)

1973-74

#1

Those Were the Days (third consecutive season)

1974-75

#1

Sanford and Son

1975-76

#1

Rock Around the Clock

1976-77

#1

Rock Around the Clock (second consecutive season)

1977-78

#1

Rock Around the Clock (third consecutive season)

1978-79

#1

The Richard Pryor Show

1979-80

#1

The Richard Pryor Show (second consecutive season)

1980-81

#1

Texas


Award-Winners

Oscars

Properly the Award of Merit, handed out by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences (AMPAS) on an annual basis since the early 1930s; popularly known as simply the Academy Awards (despite the fact that many Academies hand out awards) or the Oscars (the nickname for the nude, sword-bearing man depicted in the statuette). Any awards not listed here can be assumed to have gone to their OTL recipient.

1970

The following awards were handed out at the 43rd Academy Awards, on April 15, 1971, recognizing the best in film for the year 1970:

Best Picture

Patton (20th Century Fox).

Best Actor

George C. Scott as Gen. George S. Patton, in Patton. Scott refused the award, and would (many years later) ask that it be presented to the Patton Museum; the Academy grudgingly complied.

Best Adapted Screenplay

Larry Kramer, for Women in Love.

1971

The following awards were handed out at the 44th Academy Awards, on April 10, 1972, recognizing the best in film for the year 1971:

Best Picture

Napoleon (MGM), awarded to Stanley Kubrick (accepted on his behalf by Edgar M. Bronfman, Sr.).

Best Director

Stanley Kubrick, for Napoleon (accepted on his behalf by John Alcott, who had won for Best Cinematography earlier that evening).

Best Actor

David Hemmings as Napoleon Bonaparte, in Napoleon. Hemmings, at the age of 30 years, 144 days, became the youngest person to accept this award, beating the record previously held by Marlon Brando.

Best Actress

Jane Fonda as Bree Daniels, in Klute.

Best Supporting Actor

Ben Johnson as Sam the Lion, in The Last Picture Show.

Best Supporting Actress

Cloris Leachman as Ruth Popper, in The Last Picture Show.

Best Original Screenplay

Paddy Chafesky, for The Hospital.

Best Adapted Screenplay

Stanley Kubrick for Napoleon, adapted from the biography by Felix Markham (accepted on his behalf by Markham).

Best Costume Design

Milena Canonero, for Napoleon.

Best Cinematography

John Alcott, for Napoleon.

Best Film Editing

Bill Butler, for Napoleon.

1972

The following awards were handed out at the 45th Academy Awards, on March 27, 1973, recognizing the best in film for the year 1972:

Best Picture

Cabaret (Allied Artists).

Best Director

Bob Fosse, for Cabaret.

Best Actor

Marlon Brando as Don Vito Corleone, in The Godfather. Brando became the fourth actor to win the award twice (as he had previously won for On The Waterfront), after Fredric March, Spencer Tracy, and Gary Cooper. Of those three men, only March still lived at the time of the ceremony.

Best Actress

Liza Minnelli as Sally Bowles, in Cabaret.

Best Supporting Actor

Joel Grey as the Master of Ceremonies, in Cabaret.

Best Original Score, Dramatic

Nino Rota, for The Godfather.

1973

The following awards were handed out at the 46th Academy Awards, on April 2, 1974, recognizing the best in film for the year 1973:

Best Picture

The Exorcist (Warner Bros.), awarded to William Peter Blatty.

Best Director

Peter Bogdanovich, for The Exorcist.

Best Supporting Actress

Jamie Lee Curtis as Regan MacNeil, in The Exorcist. Curtis, at the age of 15 years, 131 days, became the youngest person to accept this award, and the youngest performer to receive any award in a competitive category, in both cases beating the record previously held by Patty Duke.

1974

The following awards were handed out at the 47th Academy Awards, on April 8, 1975, recognizing the best in film for the year 1974:

Best Picture

Chinatown (Paramount), awarded to Robert Evans.

Best Director

Francis Ford Coppola, for The Godfather Part II.

Best Supporting Actor

Harvey Korman as Hedley LaMarr, in Blazing Saddles.

Emmys

The Emmy Awards have been presented by the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences (ATAS) on an annual basis since 1948. The name “Emmy” is a corruption of “Immy”, a nickname for image orthicon tubes used in early television cameras; the term was thus feminized to better fit the statuette, a winged woman holding an atom. Any awards not listed here can be assumed to have gone to their OTL recipient.

1967-68

The following awards were handed out at the 20th Emmy Awards, on May 19, 1968, recognizing outstanding television for the 1967-68 season:

Outstanding Comedy Series

The Lucy Show, produced by Desilu Productions (Lucille Ball, Gary Morton, and Tommy Thompson); aired on CBS.

Outstanding Dramatic Series

Star Trek, produced by Desilu Productions (Gene Roddenberry and Gene L. Coon); aired on NBC.

Outstanding Musical or Variety Series

Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In, produced by George Schlatter and Ed Friendly; aired on NBC.

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Comedy Series

Lucille Ball as Lucy Carmichael, in The Lucy Show (CBS). (second consecutive win; fourth overall, and second in this role)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Dramatic Series

Barbara Bain as Cinnamon Carter, in Mission: Impossible (CBS). (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Dramatic Series

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in Star Trek (NBC).

Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing

Donald R. Rode, for the episode “The Doomsday Machine” of Star Trek (NBC).

1968-69

The following awards were handed out at the 21st Emmy Awards, on June 8, 1969, recognizing outstanding television for the 1968-69 season:

Outstanding Comedy Series

Get Smart, produced by Talent Associates (Buck Henry, Arne Sultan, and Burt Nodella); aired on ABC.

Outstanding Dramatic Series

Mission: Impossible, produced by Desilu Productions (Bruce Geller and Joseph Lantman); aired on CBS. (second overall win)

Outstanding Musical or Variety Series

Rowan and Martin's Laugh-In, produced by Ed Friendly; aired on NBC. (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actor in a Dramatic Series

Martin Landau as Rollin Hand, in Mission: Impossible (CBS).

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Dramatic Series

Barbara Bain as Cinnamon Carter, in Mission: Impossible (CBS). (third consecutive win)

Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing

Donald R. Rode, for the episode “Of Gods and Men” of Star Trek (NBC). (second consecutive win)

1969-70

The following awards were handed out at the 22nd Emmy Awards, on June 7, 1970, recognizing outstanding television for the 1969-70 season:

Outstanding Comedy Series

Room 222, produced by Paramount Television (Gene Reynolds and James L. Brooks); aired on ABC.

Outstanding Dramatic Series

Star Trek, produced by Desilu Productions (Gene Roddenberry, Gene L. Coon, Robert H. Justman, and D.C. Fontana); aired on NBC. (second overall win)

Outstanding Musical or Variety Series

The David Frost Show, produced by Westinghouse Broadcasting (David Frost and Peter Baker); aired in syndication.

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Dramatic Series

Barbara Bain as Cinnamon Carter, in Mission: Impossible (CBS). (fourth consecutive win)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Michael Constantine as Mr. Seymour Kaufman, in Room 222 (ABC).

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Karen Valentine as Miss Alice Johnson, in Room 222 (ABC).

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Dramatic Series

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in Star Trek (NBC). (second overall win)

Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing

Donald R. Rode, for the episode “Yesteryear” of Star Trek (NBC). (third consecutive win)

1970-71

The following awards were handed out at the 23rd Emmy Awards, on May 9, 1971, recognizing outstanding television for the 1970-71 season:

Outstanding Comedy Series

Those Were the Days, produced by Tandem Productions (Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin); aired on CBS.

Outstanding Dramatic Series

Star Trek, produced by Desilu Productions (Gene Roddenberry, Gene L. Coon, Robert H. Justman, and D.C. Fontana); aired on NBC. (second consecutive win, third overall)

Outstanding Musical or Variety Series

The Flip Wilson Show, produced by Bob Henry Productions and Clerow Productions (Monty Kay, Bob Henry, and Flip Wilson); aired on NBC.

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actor in a Comedy Series

Jack Klugman as Oscar Madison, in The Odd Couple (ABC).

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Comedy Series

Jean Stapleton as Edith Bunker, in Those Were the Days (CBS).

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Dramatic Series

Barbara Bain as Cinnamon Carter, in Mission: Impossible (CBS). (fifth consecutive win)

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Edward Asner as Lou Grant, in The Mary Tyler Moore Show (CBS).

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Valerie Harper as Rhoda Morgenstern, in The Mary Tyler Moore Show (CBS).

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Dramatic Series

Leonard Nimoy as Mr. Spock, in Star Trek (NBC). (second consecutive win, third overall)

Outstanding Achievement in Film Editing

Donald R. Rode, for the episode “The Sleepers of Selene” of Star Trek (NBC). (fourth consecutive win)

1971-72

The following awards were handed out at the 24th Emmy Awards, on May 6, 1972, recognizing outstanding television for the 1971-72 season:

Outstanding Comedy Series

Those Were the Days, produced by Tandem Productions (Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin); aired on CBS. (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Dramatic Series

Elizabeth R, produced by the British Broadcasting Corporation (Christopher Sarson and Roderick Graham); aired on PBS.

Outstanding Musical or Variety Series

The Flip Wilson Show, produced by Bob Henry Productions and Clerow Productions (Monty Kay, Bob Henry, and Flip Wilson); aired on NBC. (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actor in a Comedy Series

Carroll O'Connor as Archie Bunker, in Those Were the Days (CBS).

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Comedy Series

Jean Stapleton as Edith Bunker, in Those Were the Days (CBS). (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Dramatic Series

Glenda Jackson as Queen Elizabeth I, in Elizabeth R (PBS).

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Edward Asner as Lou Grant, in The Mary Tyler Moore Show (CBS). (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Penny Marshall as Gloria Bunker-Higgins, in Those Were the Days (CBS).

1972-73

The following awards were handed out at the 25th Emmy Awards, on May 20, 1973, recognizing outstanding television for the 1972-73 season:

Outstanding Comedy Series

Those Were the Days, produced by Tandem Productions (Norman Lear and Bud Yorkin); aired on CBS. (third consecutive win)

Outstanding Dramatic Series

Spencer's Mountain, produced by Lorimar Productions (Lee Rich and Robert L. Jacks); aired on CBS.

Outstanding Musical or Variety Series

The Carol Burnett Show, produced by Punkin' Productions, Inc. (Joe Hamilton, Arnie Rosen, and Carol Burnett); aired on CBS.

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actor in a Comedy Series

Jack Klugman as Oscar Madison, in The Odd Couple (ABC). (second overall win)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Comedy Series

Mary Tyler Moore as Mary Richards, in The Mary Tyler Moore Show (CBS).

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Edward Asner as Lou Grant, in The Mary Tyler Moore Show (CBS). (third consecutive win)

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Valerie Harper as Rhoda Morgenstern, in The Mary Tyler Moore Show (CBS). (second overall win)

1973-74

The following awards were handed out at the 26th Emmy Awards, on May 28, 1974, recognizing outstanding television for the 1973-74 season:

Outstanding Comedy Series

The Mary Tyler Moore Show, produced by Paramount Television (James L. Brooks, Allan Burns, and Ed. Weinberger); aired on CBS.

Outstanding Dramatic Series

Kojack, produced by Universal Television (Abby Mann, Matthew Rapf, and James Duff McAdams); aired on CBS.

Outstanding Musical or Variety Series

The Carol Burnett Show, produced by Punkin' Productions, Inc. (Joe Hamilton, Arnie Rosen, and Carol Burnett); aired on CBS. (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actor in a Comedy Series

Carroll O'Connor as Archie Bunker, in Those Were the Days (CBS). (second overall win)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actress in a Comedy Series

Mary Tyler Moore as Mary Richards, in Those Were the Days (CBS). (second consecutive win)

Outstanding Continued Performance by a Leading Actor in a Dramatic Series

Telly Savalas as Lt. Theodore “Teddy” Kojack, in Kojack (CBS).

Outstanding Supporting Actor in a Comedy Series

Richard Dreyfuss as Richard Higgins, in Those Were the Days (CBS).

Outstanding Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series

Penny Marshall as Gloria Bunker-Higgins, in Those Were the Days (CBS). (second overall win)


See Also

timelines/facts_and_figures_that_wacky_redhead.txt · Last modified: 2016/10/10 15:35 by petike