TL-191: Yankee Joe - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the U.S. Armed Forces

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Huh. Well an air-cooled system for sure! @cortz#9 might be up for making an LMG for the US Army that might not be based on a Browning design. Would be cool to see of course. Come to think of it we might see a different gun altogether despite it taking the same caliber round. Perhaps US soldiers would call their MGs a ".30 cal" but the design itself would be totally different.

    As for female soldiers being in the US Army in TL-191, in frontline roles similar to the Soviets - no. Hard no, in my opinion.

    Its not that I'm opposed to the idea and it would be fun to see, but even in TL-191 its hard to see American women being allowed to fight in that capacity. A lot of factors played into the decision for women in the Soviet Union to fight in frontline roles - political, social, military, all unique to Russia actually. In this world though even black men aren't allowed to fight in any serious capacity, either in the US and far less so in the CS, let alone women. Despite one instance of black men fighting for the CS of all things in the Great War, we may actually be looking at a time period where those kinds of social issues have been set back by decades.

    Don't mean to dampen the optimism here, but other than auxiliary, clerical, medical and administrative roles behind the front lines, women in the US military would probably not see frontline line action. The only way I can see American women fighting is if they were in a guerrilla bands in Ohio or something. Despite socialist presidents in the US, that kind of thing would be hard sell for men in the military at this time.
     
  2. Gunman873 Member

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    Here are some ideas for a Northern infantry automatic rifle design:

    Thompson's .30-06 prototype
    upload_2018-10-16_6-27-6.png


    Lewis Assault Phase models
    upload_2018-10-16_6-29-17.png
    upload_2018-10-16_6-29-37.png

    Lewis Light Models
    upload_2018-10-16_6-30-0.png
    upload_2018-10-16_6-30-18.png




    Johnston Model D-1918
    upload_2018-10-16_6-31-31.png

    Hotchkiss Portable: as Hotchkiss was an American, I dont see him leaving for France to follow a a firearms career and his designs stay in the US. He modernizes his WW1 version into either magazine fed or possible belt fed
    [​IMG]

    Johnson 1941
    [​IMG]
     
  3. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    The Johnson Rifle and its derivatives is appealing for me. It would be interesting to see these models have more of a presence in this timeline, a good what-if, butterfly effect where designs that didn't make the cut or were not used as much suddenly get prominent roles.

    I'd personally go with some kind of alternate iteration of the Johnson Family of rifles for a US assault rifle candidate. It would probably not see much service if introduced, probably being issued to soldiers by May of 1944, but honestly there might be a possibility. With the amount of TARs the US Army has captured it would completely baffle me if they didn't decide to take notes and make their own design, kind like how the Germans captured SVT-40s to help make their G43 rifle.
     
  4. Father Maryland Enemy of Neo Secesh Everywhere

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    One of the things that still puzzles me is that in the TL 191 WW1 the US didn't make any domestic designs of fighter aircraft but just imported German designs and made them locally. Yet in WW2 the US produces it's own designs. I mean I understand why the US didn't have their own internally designed fighters in our WW1. We weren't involved for very long and adopted many allied weapon systems to speed up deployment. But in TL 191 the US is at war for what four years but with substantially less industrial/economic pressure then WW2. In WW1 most of the US's industry was pretty much untouched while in WW2 vast amounts were captured or destroyed either in the ground fighting or from air bombardment.
     
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  5. Father Maryland Enemy of Neo Secesh Everywhere

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    I think Northern Pennsylvania was the furthest north the Confederates reached with the battle of Pittsburgh being Stalingrad with a different name.

    Though one thing that always bugs me about TL 191 is why the US never hung onto Northern Virginia until they won WW2.
     
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  6. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Right. And pretty much any state that the Confederates occupy would be a hotbed for partisan activities. Ohio more so than Pennsylvania in my opinion, but hey. Just my opinion. I see small unorganized bands in occupied Pennsylvania being more a thing given that the state was occupied for almost a year, but in Ohio I can see the groups being more organized seeing as though they were under occupation for a slightly longer period. Pennsylvania bands might take to the countrysides to hide out and strike at Confederate supply-lines most likely.

    Ah, the case of Northern Virginia! A complicated one.

    The USA was actually able to hold on to Northern Virginia. It took the territory north of the Rappahannock River after 1917 to give D.C. a buffer of land, but for the longest time the area was rife with anti-US, pro-Confederate activity. Hopes that Featherston would take it back Northern Virginia in a plebiscite in the 1930s were nothing but a false hope despite an intensely anti-US population. The place is well-fortified too, by both sides.
     
  7. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Uh... factories in the western states?
     
  8. Father Maryland Enemy of Neo Secesh Everywhere

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    Yes there would be industry in the Western US but the Eastern US would probably be more heavily industrialized like OTL.
     
  9. Polish Eagle AntiFa Supersoldier

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    Between militaristic Prussian Democrats and Socialists, it’s plausible that some war industries were directed to California through subsidies.

    Besides, most of the US aviation giants IOTL were well outside the areas threatened by the Confederacy—either New York (Consolidated, Grumman, Republic) or California (Martin, Lockheed, Hughes, Douglas). The same market forces directing airplane manufacturers to those places probably work ITTL. Only McDonnell (of St. Louis) is in any danger of being overrun.
     
  10. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    Some ideas I drew up for a US GPMG.

    ==MG-US.jpg
    Tried to give them both a German and US look, I think the bottom comes closest to my original idea but I like the top one most but it looks too German at the same time, which is probably why I like it.
     
  11. RamscoopRaider Some Sort of Were-Orca, probably an Akhlut Donor

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    I think it's because the German models were better, European air combat was more brutally darwinian than in North America, so Germany was spurred to develop faster. Remember Canada and the CSA aren't producing their own aircraft, so they get the latest and greatest aircraft after the UK and France have already using been them awhile, so the Germans have run into them first and already have a counter ready while the US is just starting to see those new aircraft. Quicker to import a German design that exists than to design an answer from scratch. And I think the US did use its own fighters at the start of WWI, I swear there was a mention of a US built pusher fighting scout
     
  12. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    The first one looks like the most realistic and practical one to me.

    I think the best answer would be that the US used a combination of their own native designs and those imported from Germany. Some would obviously be better suited for certain roles over the other, which the US would use them for.
     
  13. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    Any ideas for a US light-scout/utility/transport car? Of the Jeep, Kubelwagen, or Kurogane variety?

    3cuts.jpg

    ^^^ --- Type 95 "Kurogane"

    vw-kubelwagen-mit-MG34.jpg

    ^^^ --- Kubelwagen

    Willys MB_small.jpg

    ^^^ --- Willys MB

    Any ideas for a military car like these for the US Army?
     
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  14. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    6f74c7d09236773af0b7f29fef9854ab.gif
    This looks a lot like an early post First Great War uniform.
     
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  15. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    It would make a good US uniform if the crown on the epaulets could be removed.

    TL-191-.gif

    What would be the US equivalent of Panzer Grenadier?
     
    Last edited: Oct 17, 2018
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  16. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    Mobile infantry?
     
  17. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    Not sure if this fits in the thread or not but it occurred to me Quebec's uniforms would resemble OTL Vichy French uniforms. Being a mix of OTL German/American and French influences. The German/American influences being obvious while also having purchased plenty of leftover French surplus from the First Great War.
     

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  18. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    I thought about, has a very modern sound to though don't you think? I was thinking Motorized Dragoons but I don't like the way it rolls off the tongue.
    How about Motorized Cavalry?
     
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  19. Alterwright "You were never even a player."

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    How about just good ol' "Mechanized Infantry"? XD

    That's the equivalent to the Panzer-grenediers anyway.
     
  20. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    I suppose, its just when I hear the terms Mobile or Mechanized infantry, I see visions of desert Storm era soldiers. I think modern APC's, I don't know why, all the news footage I saw during the time I guess. You don't hear those terms when one watches WWII documentaries.
     
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