TL-191: Yankee Joe - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the U.S. Armed Forces

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Sep 30, 2018.

  1. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    How about these for American fighters and bombers respectively?
    yn_83_karakovic_by_jflaxman-d30aay8.jpg AU1mFuu.jpg
     
  2. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    They're very cool looking but they also look more advanced that what was around IOTL and TL-191 always seemed less advanced than OTL.
    They would probably work in the Drakaverse.
     
  3. RamscoopRaider Some Sort of Were-Orca, probably an Akhlut Donor

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    In some ways less, in some more. 191 got nukes a year or so ahead of OTL remember. Apart from that Jet aircraft saw large scale use earlier, same with long range rockets
     
  4. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    I'm wondering if the Concord analogue could have been the result of a joint project between the Germans and Americans, following the second Great War.

    They do seem to be somewhat ahead in those areas.
     
  5. Polish Eagle AntiFa Supersoldier

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    I doubt it. Each of them are stronger powers than Britain and France were IOTL, and have correspondingly strong domestic aviation industries. They’d rather award supersonic transport contracts to local providers than try to figure out a joint metric-US Customary airliner.

    There’s also the question of markets. While Germany can fly supersonic planes to its colonies in Africa across the Sahara without bothering too many people, the US will have the same sonic boom issues as IOTL—so the disincentive for American supersonic liners still exists.

    Japan, actually, might be one of the few markets where this does make sense, with their far-flung island empire.

    So I’d expect supersonic airliners from Mitsubishi and Junkers, not so much from Boeing.
     
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  6. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    The fact that both the US and the CSA got The Bomb and got it earlier than OTL was the most implausible thing about TL-191 for me.
     
  7. RamscoopRaider Some Sort of Were-Orca, probably an Akhlut Donor

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    It's not at all implausible for the US to get it earlier given the POD. WWI was a year shorter so the scientific community gets back to normal a year earlier. Move up relevant discoveries a year earlier and you can seriously start looking at it in 1938 as opposed to 1939 and have more prewar time to work on it. This makes things even easier as scientists share needed research between countries, rather than everyone having to develop everything on their own

    The CSA, yeah
     
  8. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    IOTL the US had more resources and a lot of extra scientist who left Europe to escape Nazism and Fascism.
     
  9. RamscoopRaider Some Sort of Were-Orca, probably an Akhlut Donor

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    More time helps in that regard. Extra year of peacetime, couple years in fact as the European War did not start much earlier than the North American one, means that effectively the US has all those scientists free for a few years as until the war starts publishing is relatively uncensored and everybody gets it. Plus you have to consider that OTL Manhattan was a shotgun approach, throw everything to the wall and see what sticks. If you have more knowledge going in, then you can take a much more focused course and avoid a lot of wasteful spending, which is how everybody but the US managed it much cheaper
     
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  10. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    Feels like something both the CS and US would use.
     
  11. Kevin Renner Well-Known Member


    Oh mein Gott. Der USA in der TL-191 ist Milvaukee
     
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  12. Kevin Renner Well-Known Member

    US small arms IMO will tend to be heavily influenced by German small arms. The Springfield '03 is a Mauser after all. Pistols unless the US Army has the experience of the Phillippines will likely still be .38/9mm. Most likely Parabellum if they go the semi auto route. Any carbine I could see being a juiced up 9mm. Maybe a 9 x 30 or 9 x 35 cartridge. For LMGs anything from JMB is off the table IMO. But maybe we see some German firearms designers immigrate to the US. Maybe something along the lines of a belt fed FG-42. Or Lewis Gun descendants. That is provided Lewis even exists or goes into firearms design. That's the problem with the whole TL-191 series. HT just took historical events and changed the names to protect the innocent.
    I can see various German industrial concerns setting US subsideries. Ala say BMW LTD USA. Or Daimler-Bemz US. Or joint concerns. Bethlehem-Krupp. Ford building Jumo or D-B aero engines under license. Nash/Auto Union. If any of these companies exist in the timeline. We might well see the Bain Wagon Company along with Studebaker making the jump into car/truck production. nother consequence of TL-191 is Cincinatti will not be the industrial power house it became especially in the Machine Tool Industry. In fact I see very little industry in the US being in range of potential artillery range of the CSA.
     
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  13. pattontank12 Better Dead than Red!

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    I'm thinking that the Custer would resemble the BT series tanks only with a different frontal plate and turret, mainly because I can see the US army adopting the Christie suspension system here. 9281808329_031505f388_b.jpg
     
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  14. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

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    I actually thought of having the CSA adopt the Christie suspension over on the "Featherston's Finest" thread because both the Russians and the British use the Christie and this could've been the biggest contribution the CSA made to the Allies.
    I regret not doing that now.
     
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