McGoverning

The recent death of Paul Volcker brought up some discussion of the effects his inflation hawkery had on the Latin American debt crisis. Galbraith and Volcker’s Treasury seems to be taking a not dissimilar tack to Volcker’s Federal Reserve on inflation - with the different conditions of 1973 from 1979, is the debt crisis as aggravated as it was OTL?
EDIT: Ah, gosh, just remembered Allende. That could be another wrinkle.
 
The recent death of Paul Volcker brought up some discussion of the effects his inflation hawkery had on the Latin American debt crisis. Galbraith and Volcker’s Treasury seems to be taking a not dissimilar tack to Volcker’s Federal Reserve on inflation - with the different conditions of 1973 from 1979, is the debt crisis as aggravated as it was OTL?
EDIT: Ah, gosh, just remembered Allende. That could be another wrinkle.
No new Pinochet-influenced Chilean constitution for starters. Any new chapters ready for New Year's?
 
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As part of the much older discussion on prepared headlines and what could ensue in terms of the ATL effects, @Yes, I think you would find some interest from this prepared one for Apollo 8 if the crew had been lost in flight:

 
As part of the much older discussion on prepared headlines and what could ensue in terms of the ATL effects, @Yes, I think you would find some interest from this prepared one for Apollo 8 if the crew had been lost in flight:

Man, that is the bummer version of "Dewey Defeats Truman."
 
Hey, thanks for the link to our site! When I saw we were getting some visits from alternatehistory.com and the name of the thread was "McGoverning," I rushed to check this thread out and yeah, it was an understatement to say I was not disappointed.

I've been a long-time lurker here for years but I finally decided to create an account to tell @Yes that I absolutely binged this AH the other night and I can't wait to see more. Also definitely interested, as someone who's pretty obsessed with 1970s OTL pop culture, in more glimpses at the American cultural landscape in McGovern's first term.
 
Still waiting to hear about Rinka.
@THE OBSERVER,

No dogs were harmed in the making of this Brit-fix. Can't say for sure about anyone - or anything - else, though...

Any new chapters ready for New Year's?
Yes, as a matter of fact (the affirmative, not my nom de forum.) Should have the first one up very soon. Besides the inevitable family time over the holidays (a good thing) and pressures of work (a... thing, definitely a thing...) I've spent much of the last three weeks engaged in a major effort to storyboard the granular details through the remainder of this volume, sort out how everything fits together, what I present and what lies in the background, etc., in hopes that a concerted effort to do that now will make things run smoother with chapter production this year as compared to 2019. It's been a project, but a good one, and should bear fruit for the Careful Readers shortly.

Man, that is the bummer version of "Dewey Defeats Truman."
Indeed. Sooooooper downer. Fascinating to see, though.

The recent death of Paul Volcker brought up some discussion of the effects his inflation hawkery had on the Latin American debt crisis. Galbraith and Volcker’s Treasury seems to be taking a not dissimilar tack to Volcker’s Federal Reserve on inflation - with the different conditions of 1973 from 1979, is the debt crisis as aggravated as it was OTL?
EDIT: Ah, gosh, just remembered Allende. That could be another wrinkle.
It's a complex process. Galbraith's scoobies have definitely done some "inflation targeting" especially as skewed towards specific markets and industries (think LGBs rather than carpet bombing) that involves manipulation of rates. But a lot of what they prefer to do is through controls - on costs, prices, and mechanisms of trade/speculative exchange like riding herd more aggressively on the Eurodollar market - and through targeted progressive taxation, efforts to "squeeze out loose money" from commercial/private circulation. The crucial difference for potential debt issues south of the Rio Grande is that with the particular influence of Fed chairman (and developing-economies specialist) Andrew Brimmer in the mix, the specially aggregated lending facilities the West has worked to set up, on behalf of both Western bankers themselves and also the oil-enriched economies, have been directed to lend in local currencies, rather than the dollar, pound sterling, etc. The big bankers (look, it's David Rockefeller! Hi, David Rockefeller!) don't especially like that this means debtor nations can devalue their currencies and thereby restructure their debt, but it does mean that at least payments can continue at all if there's trouble. As for "freeing the markets" of these developing nations, (1) the McGoverners are deeply wary of doctrinaire asset-capturing capitalism because it would disrupt the effort to build better relations with the Global South, and (2) Galbraith et al. try very hard to persuade the big bankers and would be free-trade raiders that they'll catch more flies with honey (favorable/bearable loan terms) than with vinegar (austerity).

Chugging along I expect - love that article. As a Seventies kid who grew up on English-language copies of Asterix & Obelix it was a real kick to see less-subtly editorializing cartoonists of the same generation (operating inside some of the same artistic conventions/traditions) do what they're doing.

There are a few interesting wrinkles there, the biggest of which is hardly just a "wrinkle." In the words of a recent blockbuster (let's not get derailed on that one, I bring it up as a witticism) this is one of those great AH cases in which THE DEAD SPEAK! Because you really, genuinely have Chilean leftists in the arts, media, politics, everyday life running around in The World McGoverning Built who are not alive IOTL, victims of the first bloody wave of Pinochet's purges, the Caravan of Death, all the obscene rest of it. Here there may be occasional, individual casualties in continued gangland-style tit-for-tat between hard-right and hard-left heavies (though not remotely on the scale of, say, Argentina next door) but there are legitimately a few thousand interesting, creative souls kickin' it in TTL!Chile with whose presence the TL will need to find ways to reckon.

On another note of Pure Uncut Seventies A E S T H E T I C, there will surely be an issue of La Firme about this:
1579039722265.png

Because with a relatively benign Christian Democratic succession to control of the center-left coalition that's still trucking along and with less revolutionary zeal overlaid on the purely structural/programming/engineering aspects, more and more corporate types have taken an interest in this kind of Souped-Up Cyber-Fordism...

Also I can't recommend enough getting a look at Eden Medina's Cybernetic Revolutionaries, the so-far-only English-language history of the OTL project, available from MIT Press (including a PDF copy someone's kindly put up, but those who are able should chip in where they can find it at a decent price.) Great stuff.

Hey, thanks for the link to our site! When I saw we were getting some visits from alternatehistory.com and the name of the thread was "McGoverning," I rushed to check this thread out and yeah, it was an understatement to say I was not disappointed.

I've been a long-time lurker here for years but I finally decided to create an account to tell @Yes that I absolutely binged this AH the other night and I can't wait to see more. Also definitely interested, as someone who's pretty obsessed with 1970s OTL pop culture, in more glimpses at the American cultural landscape in McGovern's first term.
Thank you! So very much. It's very, very kind of you to say and really does keep the gears turning, that people find interest and satisfaction in the story so far (no worries, there's more to come :).) We'll start to get into more elements of the culture and more elements too of what constitutes both politics and alternate-historical change as this TLverse, through and (Lord willin' and the creeks don't rise) even on beyond the years of the McGovern administration. I enjoy We Are The Mutants a whole bunch myself: in an effort to rein in my tangential nature (it really is Tangents All The Way Down around here, folks) I'll highlight two particular favorites that actually happen to be products of yours directly. First a shout-out to a nerd soul brother for your piece some while back on the "Eighties American cult of Doctor Who" I was a fully paid-up member (actually "paid up," I still own my 1983 Doctor Who America Fan Club coffee mug which is in excellent shape considering a generation's worth of dishwashers between then and now), the companion books, the FASA-produced RPG, the whole shamozzle (#TeamPertwee) so that was a fascinating pleasure to read from the combination of distance and a really primal remembrance. Also for the Careful Readers hereabouts I'd like to highlight @museummichael's latest (I think?) on NASA's graphics standards manual for public communications from 1975 and links to several other agencies' and one leading light's prior work with a top New York advertising/design firm that created the Pan Am logo, the modern NBC Peacock, and other fun stuff. Nothing like the crunchy, crunchy textures of other eras' lived realities. You can find that piece here and I advise readers to strap in because it's Helvetica as far as the eye can see.,,
 
Also for the Careful Readers hereabouts I'd like to highlight @museummichael's latest (I think?) on NASA's graphics standards manual for public communications from 1975 and links to several other agencies' and one leading light's prior work with a top New York advertising/design firm that created the Pan Am logo, the modern NBC Peacock, and other fun stuff. Nothing like the crunchy, crunchy textures of other eras' lived realities. You can find that piece here and I advise readers to strap in because it's Helvetica as far as the eye can see.,,
Thanks for all the kind words! I definitely like to look at a lot of my pieces at Mutants as tiny little glimpses into alternate histories, or at least maybe forgotten ones in OTL. The confluence of themes last week as my NASA piece went up and was hipdeep in this thread (especially when that McGovern poster that also used Helvetica popped up) was positively eerie. I definitely don't want to give Nixon too too much credit but when it comes to stuff like the federal government encouraging (or at least paying lip service to) the arts (my piece about Documerica is another one that comes to mind here that I'm really proud of), Nixon really was of a different breed from Reagan and post-Reagan Republicans. But then again, his paranoia also kind of ended up strangling PBS in its crib, so maybe it's a bit of a wash.

Re: Cybersyn: I concur that Eden Medina's book is a must read.
 
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