Graphic Thread

(not canon)

c. 1990s/2000s UIS military patch from the world of Zhirinovsky's Russian Empire; national flag in the middle with initials of the country at the top and "Armed Forces" emblazoned in Cyrillic near the bottom.

These were worn on the left sleeve of battledress uniform blouses and cold-weather jackets out in the field, as well as on dress and service uniforms. English speakers would often colloquially refer to UIS soldiers as "Chits" (or the more vulgar "Shits") due to the letters "UIS" in Cyrillic resembling the Latinate "CHT". This particular patch is no longer used by the UIS military, having since been replaced with a circular patch that features the military's coat of arms instead.

Sorry to nitpick, but the first "E" in "Vooruzhonniye" should be a "Ё".
 
Looks like you're right; will fix. I based it off the old Russian military patches from the 1990s, which oddly has it spelled it that way (probably just a byproduct of the embroidering process).
It's because around the 1990's, many typists and writers assumed that a reader could infer the difference between the "ye" and the "yo" based on the context, so many simply dropped the umlaut for simplicity's sake. You can see this trend in most publications that hit shelves prior to or right after the fall of the USSR.
 
Arctic Roundels.png


Some Arctic air force insignias

The Sapmi, Nunavut, and Alaska ones draw straight from the flags

The Greenland one is based on the flag, but with the polar bear from the country's arms added (and with a Danish name since I couldn't find a Greenlandic translation for "air force")

and the Svalbard is a more traditional roundel design based off the unofficial black-white-red nordic cross design I see used to represent it sometimes.
 

Variant cover for Issue #1 of "Doomsday Clock", the much-anticipated sequel series to the 80's graphic novel series "Watchmen". Although he swore he would never again return to the franchise after severing ties with the company in 1989, series creator Alan Moore returned after 'consulting at Glycon's alter in the very early morning', bartering with DC for a substantively lofty contract and promises that he would be granted full bibliographic ownership of "Watchmen" characters and contents by the next decade. In the meantime, the series was put out under DC's new Black Label, although it met with several delays as Moore came into a handful of disputes with artists (Dave Gibbons, the artist for the original Watchmen series, would not return due to conflicts with scheduling and preexisting contracts).

While many expected the comic to be a rather immediate followup to the events in-universe, the story follows the seemingly unrelated exploits of a police precinct in modern day Oklahoma, where masks and secret identities have become mandatory, and their campaign against the Seventh Calvary, a group of antifederalist white supremacists that have co-opted the radical viewpoints of the late Rorschach. Very quickly, however, a web of conspiracies begin to form, with a handful of original characters coming back into the fray, such as Laurie Blake (formerly Laurie Jupiter/Silk Spectre) as a stoic FBI agent, and Adrian Veidt (formerly Ozymandias) occupying an enigmatic side-story where he appears to be trapped in an otherworldly realm.

Although the series was immensely successful in terms of sale, it received flack from critics and readers alike who lambasted it for its 'overtly woke' content, relative to its use of topics such as southern White Supremacist movements, political correctness, federal overreach, conspiracy theorists and the disconnect between law enforcement, citizens and corporate industry. When asked about the controversy at a creators summit in Dublin, Moore told those upset with the political content to 'stick it up their arse'.
 
I tried something different for a Crumpleverse infographic and can't even remotely call it a Map, so the general graphic thread it is!

 

Variant cover for Issue #1 of "Doomsday Clock", the much-anticipated sequel series to the 80's graphic novel series "Watchmen". Although he swore he would never again return to the franchise after severing ties with the company in 1989, series creator Alan Moore returned after 'consulting at Glycon's alter in the very early morning', bartering with DC for a substantively lofty contract and promises that he would be granted full bibliographic ownership of "Watchmen" characters and contents by the next decade. In the meantime, the series was put out under DC's new Black Label, although it met with several delays as Moore came into a handful of disputes with artists (Dave Gibbons, the artist for the original Watchmen series, would not return due to conflicts with scheduling and preexisting contracts).

While many expected the comic to be a rather immediate followup to the events in-universe, the story follows the seemingly unrelated exploits of a police precinct in modern day Oklahoma, where masks and secret identities have become mandatory, and their campaign against the Seventh Calvary, a group of antifederalist white supremacists that have co-opted the radical viewpoints of the late Rorschach. Very quickly, however, a web of conspiracies begin to form, with a handful of original characters coming back into the fray, such as Laurie Blake (formerly Laurie Jupiter/Silk Spectre) as a stoic FBI agent, and Adrian Veidt (formerly Ozymandias) occupying an enigmatic side-story where he appears to be trapped in an otherworldly realm.

Although the series was immensely successful in terms of sale, it received flack from critics and readers alike who lambasted it for its 'overtly woke' content, relative to its use of topics such as southern White Supremacist movements, political correctness, federal overreach, conspiracy theorists and the disconnect between law enforcement, citizens and corporate industry. When asked about the controversy at a creators summit in Dublin, Moore told those upset with the political content to 'stick it up their arse'.
You know, while I have not read Watchmen the film nor read the book (nor seen the show), I have a good feeling that Moore's sequel would be a lot more nuanced than the TV show given his disdain for the film adaptation of V for Vendetta's misguided highlighting of the Guy Fawkes dude as an unironic "hero" (yet I know he goes up against a fascistic government but still).
 
You know, while I have not read Watchmen the film nor read the book (nor seen the show), I have a good feeling that Moore's sequel would be a lot more nuanced than the TV show given his disdain for the film adaptation of V for Vendetta's misguided highlighting of the Guy Fawkes dude as an unironic "hero" (yet I know he goes up against a fascistic government but still).
Agreed. I 1) don't really see him writing a sequel at all and 2) find it very convergent that he writes one that's the exact same as the TV show.
 
Agreed. I 1) don't really see him writing a sequel at all and 2) find it very convergent that he writes one that's the exact same as the TV show.
I mean yeah, butterflies aplenty, but I feel like there's a lot from the current show that might follow through with Moore, mostly the appropriation of Rorschach by white supremacists and major distrust of government/big business.
 
This one is an older design than the other two, predating the 4D drive. A ship designed for the latter would have avoided that style of habitat ring because they cause protrusions in the vita shielding that would massively increase the power requirements for 4D translation. Post 4D drive vessels also tend to be squatter to avoid a distended vita shield, which again increases power load. Another sign of the ship's age are the externally mounted fuel pods, generally avoided in subsequent eras.

It's a little bit more like a 'realistic' ship relative to current technology than later Crumpleverse ships overall.

 
This is the largest Crumpleverse ship I've drawn out to date, though far from the largest I've got notes for. The Mynotaver is unusual in that most 'mining ships' in the Crumpleverse are either a) drone hubs running a fleet of automated smaller ships, b) mobile factories installing automated mines onto valuable rocks, c) tow ships bringing useful asteroids into planetary orbit for the purpose of orbital infrastructure or terraformation, or d) janky civilian ships with mining equipment installed. The Mynotaver is closest to the latter, having originated as equipment added onto a large modular hull, but far better engineered and deliberately designed. The niche it serves is the need for mined material in bulk and at high speed. There are in fact further modified versions of the Mynotaver in existence; a popular one is the Smokey Yunick, which repurposes the entire set of drill arms as a repair shop for smaller starships.

 

One of the many well-known campaign posters of Malcolm Brogdy during his campaign for the Progressive Presidential Nomination in the 29th year. He recycled a slogan used by Labor President Marvin Powell, which was "A People's Kauresia.", Brogdy's campaigning team used patriotism and simplicity to get it through the voters, Brogdy's left populism eventually got him the nomination at the Progressive National Convention, and soon the majority in the Electoral Tribune.






Courtesy of @Caprice
 
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