Geronimo : What if Osama Bin Laden was killed prior to 9/11?

Part LXXII

EUreka!


*BONG* The sound of Big Ben sang through the television report, of a special late night edition of the BBC News.

“And there it is from midnight tonight, the 1st of May, 2007, the Euro is the official currency of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and it’s farewell to the pound It can no longer be spent in shops. After nearly 4 years of political tussling, the battle over the Eurozone entry is over. Britain is in.” – Jeremy Vine

The PM beamed, as he always did in moments like this, as he stood beside the Chancellor of the Exchequer, Alan Milburn. Each withdrew bright red €10 notes from the cashier, and stood with them, as cameras snapped the scene. It had been an uphill fight, the referendum, which the government had barely survived had only been the beginning.

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(Left to right) PM Tony Blair, Big Ben, Chancellor Milburn
There had been a fight in parliament and in public over every little procedure, the ascension treaty, the exchange rate mechanism, the central bank adjustment., battles kicked into high gear by the loud faction of Eurosceptics who after the referendum defeat stayed firmly pinned to the masthead of ‘saving sterling".

First, there were the Labour party skeptics who after the referendum most had stuck their heads below the sand, but a few renegades, the ‘usual suspects’ according to the Guardian like Dagenam MP Jon Cruddas or Islington’s Jeremy Corbyn who couldn’t help but snipe from the backbenches, offering a motion to ‘delay entry’ until the EU’s monitory policy aligned with Britain’s more closely. The Conservatives, though the party as a whole under Theresa May accepted the result, backed further rounds of negotiation before the final trigger was pulled, and some party members like Hensley MP Boris Johnson were happy to entertain all manner of schemes to keep the Pound, for instance retaining it as an alternate ‘duel currency’, an idea mocked as unworkable by Milburn.

He was part of the vocal faction of the party that had always been vocally opposed to Europe and grew more frustrated with the leadership of their own party for their refusal to not focus on the EU in campaigning and made up a significant clique of members who sought to entirely role back UK-EU relations, “We wish our negotiations every success, but unless government officials make serious compromises which doesn’t seem likely, there is a growing voice that is demanding our party stand up for British values” said MP Liam Fox in a Telegraph article.

Then there was the far-right, made up of three camps that varied in their extremity, the UKIP (UK independents party) under Robert Kilroy Silk, was singularly focused on the Euro becoming a single-issue party, known for their consistent picketing of government ministers, to the frustration of the more broadly Eurosceptics like Nigel Farage who left UKIP to create a new ‘more respectable centrist’ British Liberty party, which attracted the support of Tory turncoats (though no sitting MPs) who sought to fight further EU expansion, demanding a second referendum on the Euro and the European constitution to no avail. And then there were the fascists, Nick Griffins British National Party “Brownshirts in business suits” as the Home Secretary called them, who had throughout the Euro battle thrived achieving small but significant victories in local and European elections, the group had hardly shed its militancy, still sporting youth ‘clubs’ and demanded the deportation of “anyone who is a threat to Western Civilization”.

But by a country mile, the focus of the tabloids was the ‘invisible opposition’ within the Labour Party helmed supposedly by former Chancellor Gordon Brown, whose exit from government after the 2005 election could manifest headlines about his ‘growing dissatisfaction’ with the Prime Minister, each story decorated with another headshot of the eternally scowling Scotsman.

If you didn’t know any better it was as if Britain had become a One-Party state with the Conservatives often sidelined as Blair sought to rout his right flank with a tough-on-crime, anti-social behaviour policy, the so-called “war on ASBOs”, a signature Blairite policy that combined social-democratic spending with paternalistic populism. His third term marked a complete break with the Brownites, who had all exited or been shuffled out of the cabinet by ‘King Tony’ as he was more often portrayed in the press.

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(Top to bottom. Left to right) Labour MP Jon Cruddas, Conservative leader Theresa May, and MP Boris Johnson
Leaders of right-wing parties Robert Kilroy-Silk, Nigel Farage, and Nick Griffin
Former Chancellor Gordon Brown
Tony Blair after 11 years was already the longest-serving Labour Prime Minister in UK history, and if he served out the remainder of this term would surpass Margeret Thatcher as the longest-serving PM of the modern era, and by the looks of things Blair had no intentions of stepping aside yet and plans of a 4th term were making their way through parliamentary back channels, the New Labour Revolution would power on.

To secure victory in the referendum, Blair and his team had pitched to the electorate that entry would make Britain a truly competitive player in Europe, “a leader on the European stage” all language that suggested the Euro would be accommodating for the UK not the other way around, and so negotiations began with every member state hopeful of bringing the UK into the single currency without caving into British demands

Despite the bumpy road through Euro ascension Blair had always remained personally popular, especially when compared to the opposition but he had still accrued baggage, the biggest blow being struck when in 2006 the “cash for honours” scandal kicked off when it was revealed that men nominated for appointment to the House of Lords were major Labour party fundraisers, sparking a criminal investigation that was pushed into high gear when the PM was questioned by the Police over the affair.

The other major scandal was directly related to the Euro referendum, amid persistent claims from the Vote-No campaign that the government had spent unaccounted-for cash in the campaign, used illegal advertising tactics, and most scandalous of all alleged that a ‘dodgy dossier’ had been written by No.10 Downing Street to force the Treasuries hand into endorsing the Euro, claiming that a campaign helmed by the PM’s chief spin-doctors like Alistair Cambell and cabinet ministers like Peter Mandelson had been unleashed to browbeat the media and major financial institutions into backing the Euro effort, spawning opposition calls into an investigation into the government’s efforts, efforts that interrupted the delicate talks.

Things were up and down amid the negotiations and the scandal, as Downing Street welcomed EU bureaucrats, chancellors, and heads of state from nearly 2 dozen countries to manage a workable agreement finally reaching one after over 18 months of banging heads into walls finally ratified the completed agreement. “We have emerged from this process into a new era, a new generation for Britain, a new consensus in hand”. He said at a party conference speech the first since to be absent of Brown.

One by one, the Euro adversaries fell by the wayside and laid down their swords, the English pubs and cabbies that pledged not to accept the currency surrendered to the inevitable and removed their window stickers. In the immediacy, the reaction was largely positive, traders in London cheered the changeover and stocks rose, and the lower exchange rate loosened markets and fuelled a spending spree, though sceptics insisted that it was a monetary bubble destined to burst, the average consumer didn’t care, for now at least.

With his domestic politics reassured, Blair joyously returned to the sphere of global politics, an elder statesman by now he held considerable sway and was an outspoken advocate for humanitarian interventionism in Kosovo, Sierra Leone, Iraq, Afghanistan, and Darfur, forged close bonds with three American Presidents and bolstered Britain as a key player in the world stage, and had often positioned himself as even more hawkish than America when it came to confronting the Taleban, Sudan, Iraq and other autocrats who he claimed “undermined the international community” like the Ayatollah, Mugabe, Assad or Ghaddafi who had lumped together into as members of the “Dictators Club”.

But Tony still had battles he wanted to fight, the civil war in Iraq presented the Prime Minister an opportunity to bring down a tyrant he despised, once and for all, as he too joined a growing chorus of those advocating to support the Iraqi opposition, through the direct use of Anti-Terror Coalition aircraft to attack Saddam’s forces, an agenda now shared by legislators inside the United States like Democratic Senators Joe Lieberman and Joe Biden as well as Senator and Presidential candidate John McCain who said that “America should always stand with the free Iraqi people, who are being butchered by Saddam” and agreed that the United States should push for Saddam’s immediate removal from power following the especially bloody spring fighting.

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(Left to right) UK 1 Euro coin, PM Blair
Rest in peace old British Pound sterling, circa 800-May 1, 2007. You served your purpose and now its time has come to be replaced by the Euro. Though I do admit that the United Kingdom has lost a bit of its "Britishness" by getting rid of the currency it had been using for over a millennium.

I know it was mentioned in a previous chapter that it would happen anyway, but I guess with the world being a little less chaotic, the British government deciding to ditch the Pound with the Euro wasn't out of the realm of possibility.

This was a pretty interesting update Iwanh. It was nice to see what was happening over in Europe.
 
There's a tricky one

From Wikipedia :
The next day's election was not postponed, as Taiwanese law only allows for suspension of an election on the death of a candidate.

I remember TTL Chen was dead
It wasn’t until Sunday the 21st when the firecrackers really went off, by a razor-thin margin the deceased former President Chen Shui-bian was declared the winner of his re-election, meaning his vice-presidential candidate (and now president) Annette Lu would instantly ascend to the Presidency come inauguration day. Now, the KMT no longer stayed quiet and demanded the election be annulled and echoed dubious claims that Lu had delayed the announcement of the President's death until polling day to win the election
So this might not happening
It may have to postpone, and restart the election

Even as a Taiwanese myself, I couldn't figure our electoral system out that clearly
So ashamed of myself
 
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BBC Newsnight: September 4th 2004 New
BBC Newsnight: September 4th 2004

Hi everyone, just to let everyone know, this TL is up for the Turtledove on the poll here.
So if you think this timeline's good, you should give it a vote, not to blow my own horn, but I think the 'Darfur invasion' is my favourite piece of writing that I've done.
 
BBC Newsnight: September 4th 2004

Hi everyone, just to let everyone know, this TL is up for the Turtledove on the poll here.
So if you think this timeline's good, you should give it a vote, not to blow my own horn, but I think the 'Darfur invasion' is my favourite piece of writing that I've done.
I voted for Geronimo already
Such a brilliant work
 
a bit off topic but i wonder what would happen to the warrior cats series ITTL

71oKQ4O29UL.jpg


its fandom is inspired by the sparkledog/sparklecat movement of the late 2000s-early 2010s
and the later books seem kinda hunger games/harry potter esque

yet early on its fandom is inspired by pokemon, neopets and other early internet fandoms
and also the earlier books are inspired by realistic feral furry books from the 70s and 80s like watership down and redwall

im guessing like with naruto ITTL the gritty tone shift later in both series never happens
(or if it does its more like slasher horror rather than psychological horror)
 
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It might be very different
From chapter pop culture 2006
We saw MySpace were bigger than OTL
And WebTube wasn't doing well

In my opinion, the "Main Character" of this TL is : US, Afghanistan, Iraq and Russia.
Looking forward to see United States and Edwards again
at least one thing that was good about myspace is that they had their own version of the miis known as buddypoke

buddypoke.jpg


Google and Facebook to this day dont even have their own version of the miis (outside of the avatars you can have on android or the stupid metaverse models that you cant even add a tail or ears to compared to something like VRChat)

and buddypoke was fully 3D too! in 2008!

BBC Newsnight: September 4th 2004

Hi everyone, just to let everyone know, this TL is up for the Turtledove on the poll here.
So if you think this timeline's good, you should give it a vote, not to blow my own horn, but I think the 'Darfur invasion' is my favourite piece of writing that I've done.
HOLY CRAP! now thats way better than 9/11 OTL

at least with 9/4 its not as creepy as 9/11 OTL (Less like an doomsday movie or the intro to a valve game and more like something out of james bond or the old arcade shooter games like silent scope or time crisis)

just the way i like my evil terrorist plots

(i have been watching on loop just for the sheer awe of it, something i would never do with real 9/11 coverage IOTL due to how disturbing it is with all the people screaming and getting pissed and getting contaminated with all that absestos in the WTC that bleed out, making 9/11 much worst is the fact that it was how the 90s ended)
 
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BBC Newsnight: September 4th 2004

Hi everyone, just to let everyone know, this TL is up for the Turtledove on the poll here.
So if you think this timeline's good, you should give it a vote, not to blow my own horn, but I think the 'Darfur invasion' is my favourite piece of writing that I've done.
Great work as always, Iwanh! I also just casted my vote for the Turtledove Awards. You got my vote my friend.

I know that George W. Bush sent condolences to Vladimir Putin and of course news reports after the 9/4 Attacks, but how did the American public react to the terrorist attacks?
 
What's goin' on over at Dubai at this time? Or is still the same as in OTL?
I'm thinking about this: Somehow, Burj Khalifa being butterflied?
And the substitution of TTL tallest skyscraper of the world would be Trump Chicago tower
Great work as always, Iwanh! I also just casted my vote for the Turtledove Awards. You got my vote my friend.

I know that George W. Bush sent condolences to Vladimir Putin and of course news reports after the 9/4 Attacks, but how did the American public react to the terrorist attacks?
I genuinely wanna see a mini chapter shows how US public and media react in that day

Maybe it's more like OTL 2015 Paris attacks?
We might see the Twin Towers and empire state building were illuminated in the colours of Russian flag?
 
Great work as always, Iwanh! I also just casted my vote for the Turtledove Awards. You got my vote my friend.

I know that George W. Bush sent condolences to Vladimir Putin and of course news reports after the 9/4 Attacks, but how did the American public react to the terrorist attacks?
IIRC it got major media coverage and the American people were horrified by the attacks, but obviously not on the level of OTL 9/11. For a couple months the airline industry was hit by a "travel panic" and airlines briefly beefed up security but ended up dropping it after complaints from passengers. The vast majority of Americans assume that a terrorist attack of that magnitude could never happen at home. I feel like the reaction to the 2015 Paris attacks is probably closer to how Americans would react, though maybe somewhat stronger simply bc for the lack of a better term 9/4 had much more of a "spectacle." It's hard to forget images of planes being crashed into buildings full of people and destroying them no matter what buildings. Again, not anything close to how Americans reacted to 9/11, my guess is that the news cycle and with it most of the public would largely move on from the attacks after a month or so as attention is drawn back to the impending presidential election.
 
Wondering how things are going in Somalia. I know Ethiopia is still invading to back up the transitional government against the Islamic Courts Union but I highly doubt the US is supporting them, which could have significant ramifications for the conflict. How important was US support in defeating the ICU IOTL?
Just an update on Africa in general might be neat, it could also provide a look at how the humanitarian mission in Darfur is going. That and Latin America, IIRC awhile back Iwanh said changes were in store for Colombia. Regardless, whatever direction you're prepared to take I await it with bated breath, this is easily in my top five favorite timelines on here!
 
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