Dixieland: The Country of Tomorrow, Everyday (yet another Confederate TL)

In what way is it an analog to the Second Boer War? In that one, Britain had problems fighting a small force of men who had switched to a bloody insurgency, true, but unlike the CSA, Britain was this massive Great Power that was somehow getting bloodied in what was supposed to be a small police action in its own colony. It also exposed weaknesses in British military doctrine and forced the British Empire to modernize its army properly and seek allies on the global stage. The CSA isn't a major power, and while Haitian resistance is surprising, the CSA's humiliation isn't that big a deal. It's a response to getting smacked down by Spain, sure, but Spain was generally regarded as a European power, even if it's in pretty bad shape these days.

If you mean "the war that introduced the horrible, horrible concept of the concentration camp", then yeah, you're probably right. Although one can argue the Herrero genocide carried out by the Germans precedes this as a wide-scale act of ethnic cleansing.
Did the Herrero genocide happen in this timeline?
 
In what way is it an analog to the Second Boer War? In that one, Britain had problems fighting a small force of men who had switched to a bloody insurgency, true, but unlike the CSA, Britain was this massive Great Power that was somehow getting bloodied in what was supposed to be a small police action in its own colony. It also exposed weaknesses in British military doctrine and forced the British Empire to modernize its army properly and seek allies on the global stage. The CSA isn't a major power, and while Haitian resistance is surprising, the CSA's humiliation isn't that big a deal. It's a response to getting smacked down by Spain, sure, but Spain was generally regarded as a European power, even if it's in pretty bad shape these days.

If you mean "the war that introduced the horrible, horrible concept of the concentration camp", then yeah, you're probably right. Although one can argue the Herrero genocide carried out by the Germans precedes this as a wide-scale act of ethnic cleansing.
That’s fair. I also noticed that the timing for both the Boer and Haitian Wars overlapped (I think) so that’s also how I came to that conclusion.
 
It might exist. Remember in America there was a furor over the concentration camps the Spanish were using in Cuba, and Cubans were not considered "white". Although at the same time, America didn't really care when they used concentration camps in the Phillipines so it's hard to say.

As George Orwell once wrote, "All nationalists have the power of not seeing resemblances between similar sets of facts. A British Tory will defend self-determination in Europe and oppose it in India with no feeling of inconsistency. Actions are held to be good or bad, not on their own merits, but according to who does them, and there is almost no kind of outrage – torture, the use of hostages, forced labour, mass deportations, imprisonment without trial, forgery, assassination, the bombing of civilians – which does not change its moral colour when it is committed by ‘our’ side."

When you think only in terms of serving a nation, you can excuse and condone just about anything.
 
This was a depressing update to read (as most things with the title "concentration camps" are), but still much less depressing then I would've expected out of Confederate Haiti.
 
Chapter 112 - Ein Volk, Ein Reich New
Ein Volk, Ein Reich
Few polities disappointed its leaders as the United States of Greater Austria. By the beginning of the 20th century, the political system of the USGA was fracturing. Increasingly, fury at the system came from all corners. However, most damaging came from the Germans. In practice, only the Austrian side of Austria-Hungary had genuinely federalized. Due to the total refusal of the Hungarians to play along, Potocki and Franz Ferdinand plunged forward with just federalizing Cisleithania, whereas Transleithania remained centralized in Budapest. Ironically, this meant that the most powerful legislature in Austria-Hungary quickly became the Diet of Hungary. As intellectuals in Europe increasingly adopted biological concepts of race and nationalism, this grew to increasingly infuriate German nationalists. Opposotion to the Potocki plan coalesced itself around a talented politician, Georg Ritter von Schonerer, who preached German ultranationalism, anti-semitism, and increasingly anti-Habsburg populism. Schonerer called upon all German Austrians to leave the official Habsburg-sanctioned Avignon Church, calling on them to join the Union of Rome. Originally populated by British, German, and Italian liberals, the Union of Rome quickly grew to welcome a massive influx of German ultranationalists in what made for rather odd bedfellows. However, geopolitically, this actually made sense.

Schonerer called for German unification under one polity - and by the twentieth century, he viewed Austria as a fundamentally unfit vehicle for German nationhood, viewing the Austrians as traitors to the German race. Schonerer was wildly popular in Austria's universities, who quickly organized into secret societies to prepare for what they believed as an inevitable "liberation of Germans" by Prussia from Austria. Weirdly enough, the most effective and well-organized anti-Austrian secret society would eventually not emerge from the military academies as expected, but rather in the Academy of Fine Arts, Vienna, due to the tireless exhortations of one particularly charismatic student.

However, the Germans being unhappy didn't actually mean most other minorities were happy. The weakness of Cisleithanian government simply meant absolutely no oversight over the Hungarian government, which pursued harsh Magyarization policies that alienated most Slavs and Romanians in Hungary. The Poles, Dalmatians, Czechs, Ukrainians, and Bukovans were reasonably satisfied by Austrian autonomy, but the Slovaks, Romanians, Croats, and Transylvanian Germans were not. The only group in Austria proper left out of federalization, the Trent Italians, were also fairly unhappy with the situation.

The political paralysis of the era easily led to the rise of Eugen von Bohm-Bawerk, an economist who believed that the problem of Austria was that it simply spent too much. Not going anything was an attractive political option when it was very hard to actually pass any laws, so much to his own surprise, Bohm-Bawerk was eventually appointed Imperial Chancellor. A liberal, Bohm-Bawerk continued the lenient treatment of minorities, but also as a liberal, distrusted anything that sounded like spending, whether it be public works or military spending. Austria's relatively free market meant that any decrease in public investment in railroads and other infrastructure was actually replaced an increase in private spending (which vindicated his political strategy), which helped pull Austria out of a decades long recession caused by a state-driven model in a political system that couldn't actually effectively pass policies. However, his cuts to military spending were obviously not replaced by any private sector activity, and the Austro-Hungarian Army quite frankly likely became one of the worst armies in Europe.

This situation led to the Vienna Mutiny, where troops under Franz Conrad von Hotzendorf revolted against Bohm-Bawerk's latest round of austerity cuts. Arguing that Bohm-Bawerk's policies would destroy the nation, Hotzendorf rallied troops to march upon Vienna and demand the Emperor fire Bohm-Bawerk. Although greatly supported by the Germans of Vienna, which erected barricades to support his troops, Franz Ferdinand convinced his father to turn down Hotzendorf's cries. However, the Austrian army itself was of questionable loyalty and not trusted to chase out Hotzendorf. Once again, the Austrians would call upon their allies, namely the Russians who immediately dispatched military assistance. Linking up with the Hungarians, the coup collapsed and Hotzendorf fled to Prussia.

In the end, this was viewed another triumph for Austrian liberalism. After all, the economy was prosperous, politics were paralyzed but mostly stable (with most minority groups placated), and Austria's diplomatic position seemed strong. The Prussians were a threat, but the Russians, Bavarians, French, Danes had all penned binding agreements with Austria to defend it against possible Prussian aggression. Serbia and Romania were essentially friendly, and although relations with Italy weren't exactly great, the Italians seemed more distracted with various Balkan and Mediterranean colonial games - though just to be safe, the only real public works campaign in Austria would be a network of forts built into the Alpine mountains to protect against an Italian invasion (which was viewed as unlikely due to the natural mountainous defenses). The Habsburgs had united their domains through marriage, not blood and iron, so why would those be needed to protect their domains?
 
Still really intrigued in how the whole Prussian house of cards is going to fall apart. I'm also hoping that the USGA survives the coming tumult,but I'm not expecting it to.
 
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