Alternate Wikipedia Infoboxes V (Do Not Post Current Politics Here)

Imagine the leader's debates...
Scene; One man alone on a stage at a podium

Iggy; "My stance on education is ridiculous Mr. Ignatieff"

*puts on a different pin*

Iggy ;"I'm sorry but what even is my stance Mr. Ignatieff"

Iggy with a french aggent; "Les problèmes de l'Ontario ne sont pas les problèmes du Québec, nous devons être indépendants!"

*Iggy puts a flower in his hair*

Iggy; "But have you considered how my plans will affect the enviroment? What is my stance on Climate Change Mr. Ignatieff?"

This continues for another hour
 
Scene; One man alone on a stage at a podium

Iggy; "My stance on education is ridiculous Mr. Ignatieff"

*puts on a different pin*

Iggy ;"I'm sorry but what even is my stance Mr. Ignatieff"

Iggy with a french aggent; "Les problèmes de l'Ontario ne sont pas les problèmes du Québec, nous devons être indépendants!"

*Iggy puts a flower in his hair*

Iggy; "But have you considered how my plans will affect the enviroment? What is my stance on Climate Change Mr. Ignatieff?"

This continues for another hour
I'd watch the shit out of that.
 
Scene; One man alone on a stage at a podium

Iggy; "My stance on education is ridiculous Mr. Ignatieff"

*puts on a different pin*

Iggy ;"I'm sorry but what even is my stance Mr. Ignatieff"

Iggy with a french aggent; "Les problèmes de l'Ontario ne sont pas les problèmes du Québec, nous devons être indépendants!"

*Iggy puts a flower in his hair*

Iggy; "But have you considered how my plans will affect the enviroment? What is my stance on Climate Change Mr. Ignatieff?"

This continues for another hour
Split 2: Iggymania
 
Honestly I'd love to make more, I don't think I could possibly top Michael IV, Tsar of the Bulgarians.
OK… I think I found my angle.

---

Michael Grant Ignatieff (/ɪɡˈnætiɛf/; born May 12, 1947) is a Canadian screenwriter, director, producer, playwright and historian.



Early career

Ignatieff began his career at the Canadian Broadcasting Service, where he worked as a contributing journalist and researcher for shows such as the fifth estate; only in his spare time did he dabble in fiction. In 1975, he requested a transfer to the CBC's dramatic programming, showing an excerpt from a script he was working on, True Patriot Love. Ignatieff would later say it was "not my best work … but it was enough to prove I had something." The script itself was never finished.

For the next several years, Ignatieff worked as one of many writers on a variety of TV shows. During this time, he wrote The Measure of Pain, a story about a teenager recovering from an automobile accident that left him handicapped; it was made as a TV movie and met with lukewarm reception overall, though some scenes were praised.

Deciding to fully commit to screenwriting, Ignatieff moved to Los Angeles in 1980 and applied for jobs in Hollywood. During this period, he mostly worked as an uncredited script doctor, but he penned two of his own scripts: The Needs of Strangers, a screwball comedy; and, together with Hugh Brody, 1919, a drama about two former patients of Sigmund Freud. Both scripts were optioned and brought attention to Ignatieff.

Breatkthrough

Ignatieff made his directorial debut in 1991 with Asya, which he also wrote. Asya follows the eponymous character across her life, from her youth as a Russian princess to her time in exile. It received mixed-to-positive reviews, but it brought greater attention to Ignatieff, with some critics [who?] describing him as an up-and-coming director. He followed it in 1993 with Scar Tissue, the story of a philosophy professor (John Turturro) who deals with the gradual breakdown of his relationships on all fronts. It was a mild success at the box office but critically acclaimed, earning an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

With his newfound clout, Ignatieff deferred working on a third film and turned his attention to other projects. A keen Russophile, Ignatieff adapted several Russian novels to screenplay; though only one was produced (Onegin, directed by Martha Fiennes), the experience cemented him within the industry as dependable. He also wrote and produced Blood and Belonging: Journeys into the New Nationalism for the BBC, a documentary series exploring the dangers of ethnic nationalism in the post-Cold War period, for which he won a BAFTA and Canadian Gemini Award; he would also later adapt the series to print format.

His third film arrived in 2000: Isaiah Berlin, a biopic of the liberal philosopher starring Gary Oldman. The film reflected Ignatieff's growing interest in political and philosophical matters, now moving it into the public sphere; Berlin was an idol of his during his university studies, and his death in 1997 spurred him to commemorate him. It was well-received critically, but it underperformed at the box office and failed to gain notice during the award season. Ignatieff did thorough research during pre-production, and would later organize and expand it into a full biography.

He released his fourth film, Charlie Johnson in the Flames, in 2005. Starring Liam Neeson as a war journalist in Bosnia, it marked a shift in Ignatieff's style from pure character drama to an action thriller. The film bombed at the box office and critics lambasted the direction. Ignatieff would later admit that it was a reaction to the muted response of Isaiah Berlin, and, while not disowning it, expressed "regret" at his creative process at the time.

Theatre work

After the disappointing reception of Charlie Johnson, Ignatieff turned to theatre, in an effort to "reboot my career … to recapture what I had lost in the studio system." During this time, he penned and directed two plays of his own, Dialogue in the Dark (2007) and Ordinary Virtues (2010). Both were well-received. According to Ignatieff, "several" studios approached him for the rights to adapt the plays to film, even offering him the opportunity to write and direct it, but he turned them down. He explained, "they're written as plays. I have no intention of taking them to screen."

Return to filmmaking

Ignatieff returned to film in 2014 with the political drama and satire The Audacity of Hope. Based on Senator Barack Obama's memoir of the same name, it chronicles his unsuccessful campaign for the presidency against incumbent president Mitt Romney. The film was a commercial and critical success, and earned two Academy Award nominations: Giancarlo Esposito for Best Actor, and Peter Gallagher for Best Supporting Actor.

In 2018, Ignatieff wrote, directed and produced the Blockbuster television limited series The Russian Album. The series chronicles the Ivanov family across three generations, from their elevation to the nobility to their flight during the Russian Revolution. Though fictional, Ignatieff based the Ivanovs of off his own family history. He described it as "my magnum opus … It's very, very personal to me. It's the kind of work that feels like my whole career has been leading up to." The series starred Tom Hardy, Nick Offerman and Justin Trudeau as the three Ivanovs.

For all you non-Iggymaniacs out there, every film and play I've attributed to him take their names from actual works Ignatieff has written. 1919, Dialogue in the Dark and Onegin are all actual screenplays the man wrote; Asya, Scar Tissue and Charlie Johnson are his three novels; Isaiah Berlin, The Needs of Strangers and The Russian Album are history books, and Blood and Belonging is a real documentary; finally, True Patriot Love, Measure of Pain and Ordinary Virtues are the names of essays (that I just nabbed for their names). The sole exception is The Audacity of Hope, which is a real memoir written by Obama (though obviously under very different circumstances); it does, however, serve as a stand-in for Ignatief's own memoir about failure in politcs, Fire and Ashes.
 
I absolutely love the research and the idea, but no Obama Presidency or Justin Trudeau Premiership? I couldn’t possibly live in that world.
Spreading the gospel of Ignatieff to everyone also means spreading electoral failure to everyone. It comes with the territory.
 
OK… I think I found my angle.

---

Michael Grant Ignatieff (/ɪɡˈnætiɛf/; born May 12, 1947) is a Canadian screenwriter, director, producer, playwright and historian.



Early career

Ignatieff began his career at the Canadian Broadcasting Service, where he worked as a contributing journalist and researcher for shows such as the fifth estate; only in his spare time did he dabble in fiction. In 1975, he requested a transfer to the CBC's dramatic programming, showing an excerpt from a script he was working on, True Patriot Love. Ignatieff would later say it was "not my best work … but it was enough to prove I had something." The script itself was never finished.

For the next several years, Ignatieff worked as one of many writers on a variety of TV shows. During this time, he wrote The Measure of Pain, a story about a teenager recovering from an automobile accident that left him handicapped; it was made as a TV movie and met with lukewarm reception overall, though some scenes were praised.

Deciding to fully commit to screenwriting, Ignatieff moved to Los Angeles in 1980 and applied for jobs in Hollywood. During this period, he mostly worked as an uncredited script doctor, but he penned two of his own scripts: The Needs of Strangers, a screwball comedy; and, together with Hugh Brody, 1919, a drama about two former patients of Sigmund Freud. Both scripts were optioned and brought attention to Ignatieff.

Breatkthrough

Ignatieff made his directorial debut in 1991 with Asya, which he also wrote. Asya follows the eponymous character across her life, from her youth as a Russian princess to her time in exile. It received mixed-to-positive reviews, but it brought greater attention to Ignatieff, with some critics [who?] describing him as an up-and-coming director. He followed it in 1993 with Scar Tissue, the story of a philosophy professor (John Turturro) who deals with the gradual breakdown of his relationships on all fronts. It was a mild success at the box office but critically acclaimed, earning an Academy Award nomination for Best Original Screenplay.

With his newfound clout, Ignatieff deferred working on a third film and turned his attention to other projects. A keen Russophile, Ignatieff adapted several Russian novels to screenplay; though only one was produced (Onegin, directed by Martha Fiennes), the experience cemented him within the industry as dependable. He also wrote and produced Blood and Belonging: Journeys into the New Nationalism for the BBC, a documentary series exploring the dangers of ethnic nationalism in the post-Cold War period, for which he won a BAFTA and Canadian Gemini Award; he would also later adapt the series to print format.

His third film arrived in 2000: Isaiah Berlin, a biopic of the liberal philosopher starring Gary Oldman. The film reflected Ignatieff's growing interest in political and philosophical matters, now moving it into the public sphere; Berlin was an idol of his during his university studies, and his death in 1997 spurred him to commemorate him. It was well-received critically, but it underperformed at the box office and failed to gain notice during the award season. Ignatieff did thorough research during pre-production, and would later organize and expand it into a full biography.

He released his fourth film, Charlie Johnson in the Flames, in 2005. Starring Liam Neeson as a war journalist in Bosnia, it marked a shift in Ignatieff's style from pure character drama to an action thriller. The film bombed at the box office and critics lambasted the direction. Ignatieff would later admit that it was a reaction to the muted response of Isaiah Berlin, and, while not disowning it, expressed "regret" at his creative process at the time.

Theatre work

After the disappointing reception of Charlie Johnson, Ignatieff turned to theatre, in an effort to "reboot my career … to recapture what I had lost in the studio system." During this time, he penned and directed two plays of his own, Dialogue in the Dark (2007) and Ordinary Virtues (2010). Both were well-received. According to Ignatieff, "several" studios approached him for the rights to adapt the plays to film, even offering him the opportunity to write and direct it, but he turned them down. He explained, "they're written as plays. I have no intention of taking them to screen."

Return to filmmaking

Ignatieff returned to film in 2014 with the political drama and satire The Audacity of Hope. Based on Senator Barack Obama's memoir of the same name, it chronicles his unsuccessful campaign for the presidency against incumbent president Mitt Romney. The film was a commercial and critical success, and earned two Academy Award nominations: Giancarlo Esposito for Best Actor, and Peter Gallagher for Best Supporting Actor.

In 2018, Ignatieff wrote, directed and produced the Blockbuster television limited series The Russian Album. The series chronicles the Ivanov family across three generations, from their elevation to the nobility to their flight during the Russian Revolution. Though fictional, Ignatieff based the Ivanovs of off his own family history. He described it as "my magnum opus … It's very, very personal to me. It's the kind of work that feels like my whole career has been leading up to." The series starred Tom Hardy, Nick Offerman and Justin Trudeau as the three Ivanovs.

For all you non-Iggymaniacs out there, every film and play I've attributed to him take their names from actual works Ignatieff has written. 1919, Dialogue in the Dark and Onegin are all actual screenplays the man wrote; Asya, Scar Tissue and Charlie Johnson are his three novels; Isaiah Berlin, The Needs of Strangers and The Russian Album are history books, and Blood and Belonging is a real documentary; finally, True Patriot Love, Measure of Pain and Ordinary Virtues are the names of essays (that I just nabbed for their names). The sole exception is The Audacity of Hope, which is a real memoir written by Obama (though obviously under very different circumstances); it does, however, serve as a stand-in for Ignatief's own memoir about failure in politcs, Fire and Ashes.
Everything about this is gold. The photo, the subtle worldbuilding, the references to OTL, it’s all great.

I hope you somehow find a way to top yourself with more alt-Iggy takes (astronaut Iggy?)
 
Everything about this is gold. The photo, the subtle worldbuilding, the references to OTL, it’s all great.

I hope you somehow find a way to top yourself with more alt-Iggy takes (astronaut Iggy?)
Thanks! Coming from the guy who inspired me to even make these alt-Iggys in the first place, this means a lot.

I know I just said it, but I'm really not sure how I can top this one. I've always tried to ground my alt-Iggys with a veneer of plausibility… not, like, a thick one, but they draw off actual, biographical details and just spin out from there in a way I find very funny. Astronaut Iggy sounds great fun, but isn't quite my style (but I really, really hope someone takes you up on it). Well, I have maybe one more idea, though I'll say right now won't be as flashy…
 
I know it's Ignatieff Week and this is off topic (I'll make up for that soon), but this is something from a short TL I've been fiddling with. The exposure of Senator Bundy (former President Evans' protege) is the largest scandal in American history and ensures that Nick Galifianakis' vice president will likewise be a two term president.

 
I know it's Ignatieff Week and this is off topic (I'll make up for that soon)
;)

The exposure of Senator Bundy (former President Evans' protege) is the largest scandal in American history and ensures that Nick Galifianakis' vice president will likewise be a two term president.
More than a little concerned that Bundy still managed 7.5% of the vote.
 
More than a little concerned that Bundy still managed 7.5% of the vote.
The truth came out four days before the election (thanks to some very daring journalist heroes) and some people simply didn't believe it until the Senate Massacre and his televised confession were dominating the news cycle in the aftermath. Others believed their electors would select a non serial killer Republican.
 
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