ToixStory's Artwork

Discussion in 'Alternate History Maps and Graphics' started by ToixStory, Sep 15, 2014.

  1. Analytical Engine Monarchist Collectivist Federalist

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    UK, EU (for the moment), Earth
    Well, you are awesome. ;)
     
    ToixStory likes this.
  2. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    Nah, the people who enjoy what I make are the real awesome people
     
  3. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    Done for the MotF 1 on Sufficient Velocity

    The Rebirth of Rome

    The Roman Empire under Maurice was not restored to its former glory, but it did survive. Transferring an increasing amount of power to the rich provinces in the Middle East and North Africa, particularly in Egypt, the Roman Empire was able to survive and endure the perilous 7th and 8th centuries that determined whether the Roman Empire would live or fall. It lived, if only barely, with at one point much of the Middle East almost lost to the Arabian invaders before being driven back for all time. The Roman Empire would endure in the centuries that followed, ebbing and rising in its power over time, though always at the forefront of European power. However, despite this, Rome's power increasingly came from other sources besides Europe. While the Empire kept a presence within Greece, Macedonia, Thrace, and of course The Eternal City of Constantinople, the true power of the empire lay elsewhere. In particular, Egypt was the center of the empire, the axis around which the entirety of Rome spun around. Egypt was the breadbasket, the population center, the Great Bazaar writ large, and the location of Alexandria: the only city that could rival Constantinople in its splendor.

    It is only natural, then, that when the Roman Empire at last entered a new Golden Age during the 16th, 17th, and 18th centuries, it would be Egypt and the Near East where the greatest fruits would be borne. It began as Rhomania came to be ruled by the so-called "Aegyptian dynasty", rulers who hailed largely from Alexandria even if they technically ruled from the palace in Constantinople. This dynasty took power away from semi-feudal governors of the themes who had gained increasing amounts of power over the centuries. They took this power and invested it into local government at the city, town, and village level, and emperors surrounded themselves with far more competent advisers under a system of absolute national rule and hands-off local rule.

    This had many effects on Egypt and the Near East within the Empire. Egypt rose to ever-greater heights, becoming far and away the richest part of Rhomania bar the city of Constantinople itself, and the population of the region swelled. Commerce became a huge industry as the markets of Alexandria and along the Nile held goods from all over the world and Egypt itself was the great middleman for connecting Europe to Asia, shifting the balance away from Thrace and Asia Minor. Yet it was in the Near East where some of the greatest effects were felt: the Anagénnisi (Rebirth). Here, city governors, bishops, and powerful patron families in the great cities of the region began to use their newfound freedoms and power to transform the Roman Near East. Many great building projects were taken underway, ancient cities transformed over decades into some of the most modern and sophisticated cities in the world. Great works of art, music, and writing were commissioned in this time, and the best minds of Rhomania (as well as Europe and the Middle East) flocked to the region. In particular, Jerusalem underwent a transformation greater than any that had occurred since the city was allowed to openly preach Christianity, becoming a city of all the world and yet unique unto itself with powerful men from every corner of the Earth vying for just a seat at the table. The City of God would only be one of many in the region to be affected, but nowhere else were the works grander of the people working harder.

    The Golden Age would not last forever, of course, but it would be one of the most notable of that period as the world began to breathe new life into itself and flourish across all continents. Rome, then, stood at the center of this rebirth and reaped the riches from it, finally living up to the legacy the nation had so long borne.

    [​IMG]
     
  4. Analytical Engine Monarchist Collectivist Federalist

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    UK, EU (for the moment), Earth
    TimTurner and ToixStory like this.
  5. Al-numbers Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Location:
    Between Gensokyo and Berk
    Man, I thought I was looking at some alien map. Took a while to realize the orientation. Nice! :)
     
    TimTurner likes this.
  6. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    I just wrote an 8,379 word backstory as a guide for myself just for a fun Halloween-themed pixel art map. Why do I do this to myself? Also, if you want an inkling of what it's about, just look up what day of the year some asshole nailed 99 complaints to a church door. ;)
     
  7. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    Done for Map of the Fortnight 2 over on Sufficient Velocity

    The Oregon Exodus

    This is a world in which the American Revolution went rather differently than in our own, and ended up creating a series of states across British North America all under the King to various degrees. These were Nova Scotia, Canada, the Commonwealth of America, and the Dominion of New England (revived to have some legitimacy and with New York as a balance to the more extremist Massachusetts). While the compromise was enough to stabilize the situation in the Americas, it did not calm all of the revolutionaries and dissenters. Those who were not happy with the status quo--a semblance of independence and more representation in Parliament but still definitively under the English--decided to move west. They first traveled to Louisiana and sought refuge there, but found that the best lands were taken or patrolled by the Spanish and the rest was wild and unsuitable for their agriculture. So, they headed west to the semi-mythical land of Oregon and eventually settled in what they called Providence Valley (what we call Willamette Valley). The capital, named Jefferson after their deceased former leader, served as the center of life for the new and small nation. The government created was one similar to the one created by the United States in our world, though leaning far more towards rights for farmers over the small but significant business class who began to trade heavily with Russian and Spanish merchants.

    Time passed and revolutionaries and radicals filtered in to the new liberal democracy, especially as the British continued to move west in the 19th century with the annexation of Louisiana. However, the biggest change came with the outlawing of slavery throughout the British Realm in 1831. Suddenly, American slaveowners and those in support of slavery were without some of their greatest resources and at odds with a powerful empire. Some chose rebellion, but the Commonwealth quickly crushed them. The rest decided to pack up their things and make their way to Oregon as best they could and create there a society in their own image. These settlers were largely evangelical in their religion and saw their arrival in Oregon as Biblical in proportion: a fruit of the teachings of the many religious men on the long road to Oregon. At first, the bands of trekkers were welcomed into Oregon, who was happy to increase its population. However, the number of southerners who poured into Oregon in the following decades greatly outnumbered the original settlers and began to transform the liberal democracy from the inside. By the late 19th century, Oregon was ruled by a reactionary government who retained voting rights for landed adult white men, but in practice it was restricted to the elites who had quickly expanded themselves on the farmlands of the Providence Valley and to the north, reducing many former landowners to tenant farmers on their own lands. Rebellions began to occur, and clashes with Native American tribes were frequent, including with those allied to the British in the West.

    Things would eventually come to a head in the 1890s with what is today called the Oregon Wars. This series of wars--really one long war with short breaks--was brutally fought between the independent-minded Oregonians and the British Empire who wished to extend its rule over Oregon and was supported, at first, by many inside the colony. However, the use of brutal tactics by the British including population transfers, camps to separate normal people from partisans, and relentless industrial warfare on the Oregonian military (a glorified militia) turned public opinion against the British as they struggled to subdue the massive territory of Oregon. By the end of the fighting, the pre-war population of around 220,000 in Oregon had been reduced by close to 50,000 killed and 30,000 deported to other British possessions as prisoners. Most of the dead were from disease and malnutrition due to the war's devastation, sickness running rampant in the land, and the conditions in the camps. Many of the dead were women and children. The international outcry against the wars resulted in the fall of the "old" Tories and restructuring of the British government and parties in Parliament. In addition, this conflict and subsequent annexing of Oregon into the Commonwealth of America as a province spurred on the creation of a constitution and the "Letter of Right" for the Commonwealth of America to form its own government separate from that of Britain, retaining only a select few aspects of British control and thus becoming, to a degree, independent.

    Today, the history of Oregon is taught throughout the Commonwealth as a multifaceted lesson of revolution, reaction, brutality, and war for the wrong reasons that continues to educate the youth of the Commonwealth for now and into the future. Oregon itself is today recovered, though much of the population descended from settlers who came after the annexation. The memories and scars live on from the halls of the Capitol in Jefferson to the gentle rolling hills of the Providence Valley, forever replaying a lesson hard-learned and signed in blood.

    [​IMG]
     
  8. Bulldoggus The Mad Keynesian of AH.com

    Joined:
    May 9, 2016
    Location:
    Massachusetts, New England Republic
    Awesome work on this, but I doubt the Norse could have a stable hold on the northeast of America without power on either of the British Isles.
     
  9. Undeadmuffin Muffin want to liiiive !

    Joined:
    Sep 10, 2013
    Location:
    The ''evil'' Canada
    Well, as long as they can keep iceland and Groenland they have a good link with Helluland (Baffin Island), Markland (Labrador) and Vinland (Newfoundland/Acadia)
     
    Bulldoggus likes this.
  10. Analytical Engine Monarchist Collectivist Federalist

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    UK, EU (for the moment), Earth
    ToixStory likes this.
  11. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    The Republic of Texas

    Credit for some of the ideas for this scenario go to @rvbomally and his scenario "Dixie"

    Here is a little Wikibox series about an alternate Republic of Texas in the modern day and its big election in fall 2017. The basic backstory is that the CSA successfully seceded due to, among other factors, Lincoln losing re-election in 1864. However, the CSA as it was doesn’t last very long and falls apart in the 1880s and 1890s. Texas is one of the states that leaves the CSA but does not go back to the United States, instead going on their own; one of three along with Louisiana and Florida. The CSA itself goes through many developments and in the modern day is a transitionary democracy with a majority black population at last holding the power in the state. Texas develops as a relatively important and modern nation due to oil, beef, cotton, and serving as a mediatory trading nation between the United States and Mexico, as well as a strong and close relationship with the United Kingdom and the Empire, as the government of the UK is amenable to an oil-rich ally in the region, just as France aligns itself with Louisiana and Florida.


    Texas develops through the 20th century into a modern and advanced nation with a centralized, if at times undemocratic, government. A Third Republic government is established in the 1920s with high hopes, but the global depression of the mid-to-late 1930s and the subsequent Eurasian War that ends in 1947 causes the Third Republic to fall swiftly in favor of the Fourth Republic, spurred on by returning Texan soldiers who fought side by side with British soldiers and spent much time stationed in the United Kingdom and France, gaining knowledge and experience of the governments there. Thus, the Fourth Republic introduces radical changes to the governance of Texas. While some transitions from a United States-style government to European had begun with the Third Republic was completed. The Fourth Republic also saw Texas move steadily to the left, as it had started to do since the 20s. A universal healthcare system was put in place, as was other elements of a welfare state as Texas was able to successfully move on from the Eurasian War a bit richer, though still having to recover.


    Today, Texas is a modern liberal democracy with a healthy political culture boosted by a strong economy that puts it among its larger peers in North America—the deeply divided and federal but massive United States, the opulent and high tech Canada, and the modern and sophisticated if politically complex Mexico—and places Texas on the world stage. Texas is a world peer in petroleum engineering, green energy, telecommunications, and rail transport, and the Port of Houston is one of the largest and most modern in North America.

    ------------

    Politically, the Republic of Texas is an interesting nation. Being complex from the beginning, the government of Texas has been known to swing rather wildly on issues and elections while tending towards a generally progressive sort of democracy: Texan conservatives urging caution to the Texan liberals moving forward. Together, the political parties work in sync to keep Texas as stable as it can be. The five main political parties, those with representation, are the Conservative Party, the Farmer-Labor Party, the Liberal Democrat Party, the Green Party, and the Libertarian Party. A brief description of these parties is below.


    The Conservative Party is the current largest party in Texas, though its modern form is relatively new. The Conservatives were founded out of the old remnants of the so-called Texas Unity Party during the second republic days, which was in turn born from various conservative movements throughout the years. The modern Conservative Party is a big tent party of various conservative movements in Texas outside of right libertarians. The two largest wings of the Conservative Party are the Christian Democrats and the Federal Conservatives. The Christian Democrats, as the name might imply, are Christian conservatives—very Catholic but also with a fair number of Protestants—who espouse generally socially conservative, traditionalist views but more left wing economic views and favor a stronger government. The Federal Conservatives, meanwhile, are, in simple terms, the opposite. They are moderate on social issues, typically acting cautiously but still able to move forward on social views the majority of the population holds while holding conservative economic beliefs. They are also the most pro-small business of the large party factions as well, and are in favor of handing further power to the provinces. Christian Democracy held sway over the Conservative Party for most of the 80s and 90s, but the repeated defeats and so-called Wilderness Period from 1997-2015 in which the Conservative Party controlled Parliament for only 3 years, though had a President for 7 years, swung the party control in favor of the Federal Conservatives. Their candidates—Dade Phelan for President and Kay Granger for Prime Minister and notably Joe Straus, the first Jewish Speaker in Texas—both took power after the 2015 election and show no signs of stepping down, especially after the success in 2017.


    The Farmer-Labor Party is the Parliament of Texas’ Second Party, and the second-largest party by membership in the nation. The party began as a series of independent movements and defected Democrats in the early 1900s and 1910s, and came into power for the first time in the 1920s. Economic downturn pushed the party back down until the founding of the Fourth Republic, which cemented the Farmer-Labor Party as it is today. The party has traditionally dominated left-leaning rural, small town, and inner city Texans through leftist economic policies and moderate social policies. The Farmer-Labor Party supports Social Democracy and helped to establish Texas’ welfare programs that have proved popular enough by the modern day that no party dares take it down. The Farmer-Labor Party is a huge supporter of labor unions and farmers’ co-ops, and even Conservative-voting farmers tend to work with the F-Ls. In recent history, the Farmer-Labor Party dominated the Texan government from 1997-2015, though relied on a coalition with the Liberal Democrat Party after 2010. This weakened F-L’s position among farmers significantly, and the revived Conservative Party in 2015 pulled an upset and swung rural farmers in West and North Texas towards the Conservatives. This was further cemented with F-L’s loss in 2017. Farmer-Labor Leader Julian Castro, however, refuses to be beaten and pledges that the split with the Liberal Democrats means F-L will return to its roots by the next election, building its power among farmers and the working class rather than purely city leftists.


    The Liberal Democrat Party is, besides the third party in Texan politics, the remaining legacy of the Democrat Party in the Republic of Texas. Transformed after well over a century of being part of the Texan government, the party has changed almost as much as Texas has. The modern Liberal Democrat Party emerged in the conservative-left battles of the 1960s as a party for suburbanites who leaned liberal socially but were generally okay with a stable and conservative economic system. The party thrived during the 1980s and 1990s as the Texan population filled in the suburbs and suburban politics came to dominate the Liberal Democrats. Though they began as a party to compete for Second Party, the party increasingly moved towards allying itself with the Farmer-Labor Party as a powerful coalition to balance out against the Conservative Party. This after the disastrous attempts in the late 70s to ally the Liberal Democrats with the Conservatives that only resulted in losing seats. The height of Liberal Democrat power came in 1997 when the Liberal Party assumed the status of Second Party while Farmer-Labor took power. The coalition governed from then until 2015, though the coalition was only official after the 2010 election when the Farmer-Labor Party failed to win a majority of seats in Parliament. However, the falling out with F-L in 2015 resulted in the loss of seats, which only continued in the highly-contested 2017 elections when the Progressive Democrats split votes with F-L. With Sheila Jackson pushed to gain numbers and look into, perhaps, even beating F-L for Second Party, the plan for the next few years is to sap seats away from the Conservatives among their moderates before pushing into F-L. With any luck, it will work.


    The Green Party is Texas’ newest major party, only achieving official status in the early 2000s. Beforehand, the party was largely a political movement working outside the government to encourage green policies such as atomic de-escalation and the shutdown of atomic reactors in the Republic of Texas. While somewhat successful on a few minor levels, it wasn’t until a new push by a younger generation of left-leaning legislators that moved the Green movement towards being an actual political power. Representation was small at first, but improved massively under the leadership of Houston’s Borris Miles. With his help, the Green Party moved from focusing on activism and protesting as their primary means of power and more towards governance, pushing heavily for green energy policies in their local areas as well as green jobs, fighting climate change, and encouraging greater help for West Texas to move away from the oil droughts and towards wind and solar power. As a result, Green gained seats in conservative provinces and in 2017 improved their seat holdings. At last, Green is having to be taken seriously.


    The Libertarian Party is the smallest of the big five political parties in Texas, and one that has been perhaps the most stable since the 1990s. The party was founded in the late 1970s as a result of the Conservatives increasingly pushing for centralized Christian Democracy at the expensive of small government and upset many stalwart conservative voters. Most of them helped bolster the Federalist side of the party, but a few split off and formed the Libertarian Party. While initially popular and managed to gain almost 20 seats in Parliament, the party eventually began to languish as Texas’ economic boom in the 80s pressed them into the back of most peoples’ minds and they almost faded into obscurity with a message mostly unchanged of small government, low taxes, and pro-business. The party eventually managed to find stable leadership under Sam Johnson. His leadership kept the Libertarians in the government, but the gains he made in the 2005 and 2010 election were gradually whittled down to winning just 2 seats in 2017, despite winning nearly 7% of the vote. The gap tends to be because Libertarians are widespread and thus have failed to take more seats since 2005. Only time will tell if the Libertarians can hold on to what seats they have in the next election, with politics growing more polarized in Texas and Conservatives on the rise.


    The Elections of 2017 proved to be tightly-contested, just as was expected when they were called in late July and preparations began, as specified in the Constitution, in early August for a parliamentary election on November 2 and the first round of a presidential election a month later, on December 2. The election was called for by the Conservatives operating as a narrow minority government and passed by all parties, largely in an attempt to better solidify their positions against the Conservatives and, for Farm-Labor, perhaps win back Parliament after just 2 years. The primary issues surrounding the election were ongoing violence in southern Brazil, messy regime change in China, infrastructure spending, fights over petroleum and green energy, and the parties’ stance on integration of the Texan telecommunication and financial networks with the rest of North America. The Conservatives favored a policy of aloofness with Texas better able to manage its own affairs and continue its close ties to the United Kingdom while Farm-Labor and the Liberal Democrats both favored greater integration with the rest of North America. The election took a particularly hard turn towards foreign policy and economics as social issues of the past decade were increasingly put to rest by both parties, particularly the Federalist wing of the Conservatives wishing to move on in order to control the government.


    For President, the Conservative Party ran current President of Texas Dade Phelan, a native of Sabine Province whose was able to combine a personal ideology of the Federalist Conservatives while still able to work in bipartisan efforts to please larger sections of the country. While broadly appealing, however, he was regarded as rather boring and weak on foreign policy, and was at a severe disadvantage to the Farmer-Labor candidate, Terry Canales. Canales, from South Texas Province, was the upstart candidate whose massive online and populist campaigns accelerated him to a media and leftist darling who was polling well ahead of Phelan going into September. Even with the Liberal Democrats running cross-aisle candidate Don Huffines (and both Green and Libertarians declining to run Presidential candidates), the campaign was obviously one of Conservative against Farm-Labor as polls showed a tight parliamentary contest. Then Hurricane Donna happened.


    The hurricane, at first expected to be a relatively normal one for hurricane system, instead turned north and ripped into Houston, largest city in the nation. While Texas had invested rather heavily in coastal hurricane defense, Houston was more unprepared than most of the coastal region. The hurricane flooded highways, drowned homes, and tore apart power lines and infrastructure. As a resident of Beaumont right near the coast, Dade Phelan was no stranger to hurricane season and was the first major politician in Houston after the storm had subsided enough to allow transportation into the city. Phelan proceeded to spend considerable time and cost aiding victims of the hurricane, though to no small amount of accusations of using it to political advantage, especially when he was joined shortly after by Prime Minister Granger. Ultimately, his quick response to the crisis and maintaining a clear and strong voice on the matter of the hurricane and efforts by Conservatives to mitigate disasters and aid in relief allowed him to gain on Canales.


    The November election eventually resulted in a Conservative victory, with a narrow majority in Parliament achieved for the party. Much of this came from fierce competition between left-leaning voters in North Texas, Gulf Coast, and South Texas between the Liberal Democrat and Farmer-Labor, resulting in Conservatives picking up seats they otherwise struggled to win. South Texas is of particular note with Conservatives actually carrying the largest number of seats in the normally highly-left state while giving up seats in North Texas. Accusations of political tampering with the votes of displaced Texans from the hurricane were rife, though ultimately and independent commission afterwards found little evidence of tampering of any sort. With the election secured, all eyes turned to the Presidential election in December. As mandated by the Constitution, Presidential elections are held one month after parliamentary elections and 2017’s was no different. Though the Conservatives were at an advantage due to their victory in the parliamentary elections, it was still a tight race all the way until the end. In the first round, no candidate succeeded in gaining the 50% of votes needed, and Canales even succeeded in getting a larger share than Phelan. Ultimately, though, more voters for Huffines or non-voters showed up for Phelan in the so-called “Christmas election” on December 16 to carry Dade Phelan once more to the Presidency, albeit by a narrow margin of 51.6% to 48.4% for Canales. Thus, the 2017 election cycle for the Republic of Texas ended, marking just another exciting time for Texans as they moved on to celebrate Christmas and look forward to the year to come.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    The larger version of the federal election map:

    [​IMG]
     
  12. GauchoBadger OPEN THE TCHECA

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2016
    Location:
    Brazil
    Some simple, yet interesting work you've done there! :)
    I bet german colonists have founded some very pretty towns.

    Would you mind if i asked... do you have any plans for the future that you'd like to share?
     
    ToixStory likes this.
  13. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    Plans how? And glad you like it! Indeed there are some very pretty German towns :)
     
    GauchoBadger likes this.
  14. GauchoBadger OPEN THE TCHECA

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2016
    Location:
    Brazil
    Planned maps, in specific.
     
  15. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    Oh wow, there's a lot. Let's see, there is a Halloween-themed pixel art map coming up, then another season-themed pixel art map, and I've also got this neat "United States of Indochina" topographical map coming out. Then there is a map about an invasion of Japan from an outside force that isn't the United States, a series of maps set in an alternate Draka-universe, and also I've got more wikiboxes on the way set in the same universe as the Republic of Texas one above that will have its own thread. :) Lots of stuff on the way!
     
  16. GauchoBadger OPEN THE TCHECA

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2016
    Location:
    Brazil
    *Fanboy squeal*
     
    Analytical Engine and ToixStory like this.
  17. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    I hope I'll live up to expectations :)
     
  18. Analytical Engine Monarchist Collectivist Federalist

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    UK, EU (for the moment), Earth
    *Another fanboy squeal*
     
  19. ToixStory Witch ❄️f Winter Gone Fishin' Donor

    Joined:
    Mar 11, 2010
    Location:
    The Empire State of the South
    Little preview for y'all of the next round of Wikiboxes :)

    [​IMG]
     
  20. Analytical Engine Monarchist Collectivist Federalist

    Joined:
    Mar 12, 2007
    Location:
    UK, EU (for the moment), Earth
    *yet another fanboy squeal*
     
    ToixStory likes this.