TL-191: Yankee Joe - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the U.S. Armed Forces

Uh.... no.

That translates as Heavy Tank Battalion 501 as the closest translation. The heavy tanks were mostly assigned as a Corps-level asset because they were too damn slow and too few in number.
If you just plug it into a translator, you get Division before you get battalion. Going by Leo, Division is #2 translation while Battalion is #13. In context yes it's definitely Battalion but if you don't actually speak German and just run it through a translator it looks like Division, though that requires you not knowing that German uses Division for the term Division in a military unit sense
 
Uh.... no.

That translates as Heavy Tank Battalion 501 as the closest translation. The heavy tanks were mostly assigned as a Corps-level asset because they were too damn slow and too few in number.
Don't ask me, ask Google:


point in fact "Abteilung" tranlates as "Department" without the addition of "Panzer" to the translation. if this is a gaffe on google's part, then that's that.
 
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Don't ask me, ask Google: point in fact "Abteilung" tranlates as "Department" without the addition of "Panzer" to the translation. if this is a gaffe on google's part, then that's that.
Abteilung has 16 possible English translations according to Leo.de my preferred 1 word translator, Department is the most typical, Division is the second most typical though it is in the sense of a corporate division. Division in English has something like 27 different possible translations into German, in the military sense it translates as Division. Google translate is just bad at context
 
I happen to actually be German, and every german-language source I've read since I was old enough referred to those units as Abteilung with whatever number. Google Translate can suck it.
 
Union Govt. model 1911 with removable shoulder stock, usually issued to motorcycle dispatch-riders, truck drivers and other military personal not assigned to front-line duty.

+ $_.jpg


Inspired by stocked Lugers, I could easily see the Union and maybe even the CSA go a similar route.
 
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The designer of the M1911 was Mormon...


In fact, aside from the Springfield and the Maxim, Browning designed just about everything the US used between the 1880s and 1918.
 
The designer of the M1911 was Mormon...


In fact, aside from the Springfield and the Maxim, Browning designed just about everything the US used between the 1880s and 1918.
So in TL-191 they would not be made at all because of butterflies?
 
The designer of the M1911 was Mormon...


In fact, aside from the Springfield and the Maxim, Browning designed just about everything the US used between the 1880s and 1918.
well Turtledove clearly doesn't care about that little detail or at the very least butterflied over it, seeing as the US is said to use the 1911, BAR and .50 Caliber in the books. Gordon McSweeney uses a .45 when he blows up the CSA river Ironclad. In either "Drive to the East" or "the Grapple" the BAR is compared to the semi-auto Tredegar, but is said to not be available in comparable numbers.

A gun designer is not necessarily a gun salesman: note that the 1911 is the COLT .45, not the BROWNING .45. the design of the pistol, while originating from Browning himself, was owned by Colt Firearms, and so THEY were the party actually doing the selling, and considering they'd been selling guns to the US military since before the War of Secession, it's perfectly logical they'd have a contract with the US Military.

Same goes for most of Browning's Guns: Browning's small gun shop in Utah lacked the manufacturing capacity to mass-produce his weapons himself, so he licensed them out to other manufacturers, such as FN in Belgium and Winchester or Colt in the USA. THEY in turn would sell guns to the US Military.
 
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The designer of the M1911 was Mormon...


In fact, aside from the Springfield and the Maxim, Browning designed just about everything the US used between the 1880s and 1918.
It’s also possible that Browning was never a radicalized Mormon. I mean, we see a few who remain loyal in the first book of the Great War trilogy. Not all Mormons would have risen up in the Deseret Rebellion.
 
Weapons of the Union SGW Army


Hotchkiss 43 smg: A late war period submachine gun manufactured by the Hotchkiss firearms company. Based off a captured samples of Confederate smg's it actually possessed several minor improvements having been designed to be cheaply mass produced. Sadly suffering a limited production run during the war primarily being supplied to Union tank crews, marine corps and even black resistance fighters. Where it proved to be favored weapon during the marines island campaigns.


Thompson 42 smg: The planned successor of the iconic FGW era Tommy Gun. With the United States military quickly discovering there desperate need for superior firepower following the Confederate invasion of Ohio. While never quite replacing its parent weapon during the war it did gradually gain popularity over the events of the Second Great War, eventually replacing the Tommy as standard issue in the post war years. Before itself was replaced by Union stormrifles soon afterward...


1893 Springfield rifle


Springfield 38 semi automatic rifle originally developed during the interwar period by the United States military as a planned replacement for the trusty Springfield. Only for its planned production run being canceled by the Socialist party and its peacetime budget cuts. Suffering limited service during the events of the Second Great War with the majority of Union troops finding themselves having to make do with bolt actions of their fathers.


Browning M1912 machine gun


Johnson M1942 machine gun


Johnson M1942 carbine​
 
My personal take on the US's firearms

Pistol:
Colt 1911A1 .45
Luger 1907 .45 (Taken for Testing, privately purchased sidearm of Cavalry officers)
Colt 1876 .45 (classic cavalry 6-shooter)

Rifle
Springfield M1903 30-06 (Licensed copy of Mauser Gew.98)
Springfield/Krag-Jorgenson M1898 (licensed copy of the Krag 1892, used by rear-line personnel)
Winchester M1895 (Black-Powder Lever-action, used by reserve personnel and security forces)
Browning M1918 30-06 (automatic "Trench assault" Rifle, produced in limited numbers)

Submachine Gun
Thompson M1928/1928A1 .45
Springfield M1930 9mm (Licensed copy of German MP-28, Issued in limited quantities to US Marine Raiders)
Winchester M1933 9mm (Licensed copy of Suomi KP/-31, 2800 built, Production run issued to Quebec)

LMG:
Winchester M1942 30-06 (Licensed copy of MG-42, used to counter CSA's Model 1934)
Browning M1919 (Tripod-mounted Support MG, based on Browning M1914)
Browning M1895 (Reserve weapon)

HMG:
Browning M1914 30-06 (Watercooled Machine gun on heavy mount)
Browning M1923 .50 (Heavy anti-material Machine gun)

Other:
M48 "Home Run" 30mm Rifle Grenade launcher, made from a modified Flare launcher attached to a Springfield.
M1944 "Barrel Bruiser" Shaped-Charge anti-Barrel rocket launcher, based on German "Panzerfaust" Never saw action due to the end of the war.
Winchester 1897 "Trench Gun" 12-gauge Shotgun.

(point in fact, there IS a .45 Luger, and the US did attempt to make an MG-42 copy in .30-06)
 
I believe it was the MG-34 they tried to copy but point taken.



Note the US-style Bipod and M3 Tripod. if i recall, the reason it was never adopted were
A: the .30-06 round was a bit too rough on the weapon and
B: the oft-stated Ammo consumption that to be fair is a legitimate issue of the MG-42.
 
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