TL-191: Featherston's Finest - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the CSA and Freedom Party

Some livaries of the planes by @cortz#9

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An Asskicker dive bomber belonging to the 62nd Tactical Wing in Ohio during Operation Blackbeard, July of 1941.
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A V-43 Dragonfly from the 8th Assault Wing in Arkansas, circa August of 1943.
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A Hughes A38 Hound-dog from the 19th Fighter Wing based in Tennessee, Spring of 1942.
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An A44 Raptor from the 65th Fighter Wing based at the Atlanta Municipal Airport, circa June of 1944.

Now for a bonus...

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An A38 Hound-Dog originally from the Confederate 11th Fighter Wing being used for evaluation by the Union Air Force after it crash landed in West Virginia in the Winter of 1941. This very Hound-Dog is now on display at the Smithsonian (on loan from the Museum of the US Air Force) in it's original CSAF paint scheme.
Very nice! I like the red trim and I really like the captured Hound-Dog.
 

For whatever reason, I could see the Confederates getting the Browning Hi Power.

Or maybe have a straight up M1911 knock off, much like the OTL Star Model B
 
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My List of Confederate Firearms during both of the Great Wars.

Pistols

Webley Service Pistol Mk VI - .455 Webley. Standard service revolver from 1908 to 1944 with the Confederate Military, Freedom Party, and Police.
Aston Automatic Service Pistol Mk I - .455 Automatic (similar to the FN Model 1910). A limited production and use automatic pistol developed before the GW1, but only used by the Confederate Air Service and Navy. Retired from Confederate Military service by 1930.
Ferguson Model A - 9x22mm (similar to the Star Model A). An unlicensed copy of the Colt M1911 produced from 1921 to 1931 by the Ferguson Arms Company, Featherston famously owned a chrome plated example, which is currently in a private collection. Also used by the Confederate Military, Police, and Freedom Party as well as the Mexican and Nicaraguan Armies.
Ferguson Model B - 9x22mm (similar to the Star Model B). An improved version of the Model A produced from 1930 to 1944, sold to the civilian market as well to the Confederate Military, Police, Prison System, and Freedom Party. Also sold to Mexico, Portugal, South Africa, Venezuela, and Paraguay.
Ferguson Model C - 9x22mm (similar to the Star Model BM). A scaled down variant of the Model B developed specifically for the Confederate Secret Police and Freedom Party Guards. Jacob Featherston also owned a chrome plated Model C pistol and was taken off of body by one of the Black Militiamen and has vanished ever since (though many people over the years claimed to have Featherston's Pistol, but have turned to be fakes.)
M1936 Service Pistol - 9x22mm (similar to the Browning Hi Power). A modification of the Colt M1911 mechanism, the M1936 was developed to replace the aging Webley Revolver and to supplement the Ferguson Pistols in service. Produced from 1937 to 1944 in the Confederacy for it's Military, Police, and Freedom Party Guards as well as being sold to Mexico, Australia (where a licensed copy known as the Baker Pistol was produced), Venezuela, Paraguay, Peru, Spain, Portugal, and Sweden.
Onslow Pistol - 9x22mm. A last ditch pistol for the National Assault Force, unknown number produced, est 10,000 produced.

Rifles

Tredegar Automatic Rifle M1938 - 7.7x56mm. In 1935 as part of his re-armament plans, President Jacob Featherston would order the development of a new self-loading rifle. The design team at the Tredegar Arms Factory was already developing a self-loading battle rifle in the years before Featherston's rise to power, but the President would give the project a high priority. In 1938, the new Tredegar Automatic Rifle would enter service and Featherston would demand the rifle be built by other companies. The rifle would be the main rifle in which the Confederate Army during Operation Blackbeard would wield. As the war progressed, the demands of the 2nd Great War would force the rifle to be simplified by war's end, things such as the folding bayonet and the cleaning rod would both be absent on rifles produced in 1944, which total production would be 2,876,000 rifles.
Lee-Tredegar M1916 Police Rifle - 7.7x56mm (similar to the Lee-Enfield No. 1 Mk V). In the years following the GW1, the Confederate Army wanted to modernize, but in a way that it would raise the suspicion of the Union Government. The new iteration of the Lee-Tredegar Rifle was deceptively named the M1916 Police Rifle in order to conceal the true intention of the rifle, which entered production in 1922 at the Tredegar Arms Factory. About 40,000 of the M1916 Rifles would be sold to the Monarchist Faction during the Mexican Civil War and these alongside the M1907 rifles would remain in Mexican Military service until the early 1960s. The M1916 Police Rifle production would cease in 1937 with 600,000 rifles in total being produced. During the war, 5,000 would be converted in the M1916M Sniper variant.
Lee-Tredegar M1907 - 7.7x56mm (similar to the SMLE rifle). The Confederate Army would adopt both the new M1907 rifle and cartridge, which the cartridge was essentially a rimless version of the earlier Confederate service cartridge. The rifle would be produced from a period of 1908 to 1917 and was produced by the Tredegar Arms Company alongside with wartime contractors such as the United Steel Locomotive Factory, Atlanta Cannon Foundry, Griswold Arms Company, along with a plethora of sub-contractors. A total of 3.4 million of the M1907 rifles would be produced, with a million of the rifles being handed over to the Union as War Reparations with another large portion being scrapped along with a substantial number of the rifles being sold to the Monarchist Faction of the Mexican Civil War. In the early 1930s, the guns that remained in Confederate Military Inventory were upgraded to the M1907/30 standard, with many worn guns having their stocks and barrels replaced. At the outbreak of war, units that were not needed for Operation Blackbeard were equipped with the rifle along with about a 1,000 of the rifles being supplied to the Mormon Rebels in Deseret. As the war went on, more and more Confederate Frontline soldiers were equipped with the rifle due to the production of the M1938 rifle not meeting the wartime demands. During the war, approximately 9,000 of the M1907/30 rifles would be modified in snipers under the designation of the M1907/30M.
Lee-Tredegar M1895 - 7.7x56mmR (similar to the Long Lee-Enfield). A locally produced Confederate copy of the British No. 1 Mk 1, the M1895 rifle was produced by the Tredegar Arms Factory from 1895 to 1906 and served the Confederate Military throughout the First Great War, which many were converted to the Rimless 7.7x56mm M1907 cartridge in early stages of the war. The rifles by the early 1930s would mostly end up in storage or ones converted into carbines with Confederate Police and Border Police forces. During the later stages of the GW2, the rifles would be used by the National Assault Force as they were in the need for guns. Est, 1,004,000 rifles manufactured.
Lee-Tredegar M1889 - 7.7x56mmR (similar to the Lee-Metford). A locally produced Confederate copy of the British Lee-Metford Rifle, the Lee-Tredegar was the Confederacy's first smokeless powder rifle to enter service. They would be the mainstay of the Confederate Army until the adoption of the M1895 and M1907 rifles, which saw them being re-delegated to use with 2nd Line and the Negro Units during the GW1. After the war, many of them would be given to the Union as war reparations while others were either scrapped or put into storage. 569,000 rifles produced in total.
M1944 Rifle - 7.7x56mm. A ditch rifle designed and built by Tredegar Arms, est 109,000 and 120,000 rifles made.
Schofield Rifle - 7.7x56mm. Last ditch rifle for the NAF, 24,241 rifles manufactured.

Submachine-Guns

Mobile Arsenal/Smith Gun - 9x22mm. Undetermined number manufactured, est 68,000-91,000 produced. Last ditch weapon.
Copperpot M1944 - 9x22mm. Undetermined number manufactured, est 195,000 to 242,000. Last ditch weapon.
Griswold M1942 - 9x22mm. A simplified version of the older M1935 SMG, 745,000 produced from 1942 to 1944.
Griswold M1935 - 9x22mm. Standard submachine-gun of the Confederate Military, 610,000 produced from 1935 to 1942.
VZ-37 - 9x22mm. A Mexican built SMG, 390,000 imported between 1940 and 1944.
Ferguson Model G-55 - 9x22mm (think of a Lanchester with a bi-pod and a longer barrel and shroud). Limited production SMG from the early 1930s, 65,000 made from 1930 to 1934. Used by the Confederate Police and the Freedom Party Guards.
Windsor Submachine Gun - 9x22mm (similar to the EMP-44). Undetermined number manufactured, est 25,000 produced. Last ditch weapon. A blurry photograph of the weapon only exists.
Pinkerton Gun - .455 Webley. Last ditch SMG for the NAF, est 45,000 guns manufactured.

Portable Machine-Guns

Harrington Light Machine-Gun - 7.7x56mm. Last ditch LMG for the NAF, est 1,000 guns manufactured.
M1944 "Ripper" - 7.7x56mm. A simplified and last ditch variant of the M1937 General Purpose Machine-Gun, est 21,000 produced.
M1937 "Ripper" - 7.7x56mm. The standard MG of the CS Armed Forces during the GW2, 451,000 produced.
Hotchkiss M1917 - 7.7x56mm. 5,400 guns imported in 1925, Confederate Navy only.
Griswold M1914 - 7.7x56mm. Licensed copy of the Hotchkiss-Benet Model 1909 and standard LMG of the Confederate Army during the GW1 and used by 2nd Line Units during the GW2 as well as being used by Mexico. 282,000 guns manufactured from 1914 to 1917.
Hotchkiss Mle 1909 - 7.7x56mm. French designed LMG from 1909, 6,000 imported in 1912 for the Confederate Navy and Cavalry and used during the GW 1 and 2.
Madsen M1902 - 7.7x56mmR. Machine-gun of Danish origin, 5,000 imported between 1904 and 1906, used by the Confederate Army during the GW1 and the NAF during the last days of the GW2.

Heavy Machine-Guns and Autocannons

Vickers Machine Gun - 7.7x56mm. Standard HMG of the Confederate Military during both Great Wars, 49,000 guns in total were used by the Confederacy.
Ferguson M1937 - 13.1x102mm. A Confederate designed heavy machine-gun originally designed for anti-aircraft and anti-vehicle use, mainly used on vehicles, tri-pod mounts, ships, and a modified variant, the A1, was even mounted on aircraft. 25,000 guns manufactured in total.
Hispano-Suiza M1935 - 20x110mm. A Confederate made variant of the Spanish designed Hispano-Suiza HS.404 automatic cannon, which the Confederates would make variants of it such as for vehicle and aircraft use as well as a wheel mount for use with Light Infantry units. The weapon was referred to by Union soldiers as the "Stinger", due to the potency of the cartridge that the weapon fired.
Tredegar M1916 - 7.7x56mm. Standard aircraft mounted machine-gun for Confederate Aircraft in the early part of the GW2 before being dismounted due to the 7.7mm round increasingly being more ineffective in the AA role.

Anti-Vehicle Weapons

Tredegar M1937 Anti-Barrel Rifle - 13.1x102mm. In 1937, the Tredegar Arms Company would introduce into service an anti-barrel rifle which fired the 13.1mm Ferguson Cartridge. By the time of the 2nd Great War in 1941 and further into the war, the weapon was found increasingly useless against armored vehicles, and so from 1942 onwards, was used as an anti-material rifle. 11,000 rifles manufactured.
Solothurn S-18/100 Anti-Barrel Rifle - 20x105mmB. In 1940, the Confederate Army would purchase 150 of the famed Solothurn rifles from Switzerland for field trials, and during the GW2, these rifles saw heavy action.
Barrel Buster Mk. I - A cheap and effective anti-barrel weapon, an estimated 95,000 manufactured.
Barrel Buster Mk. II - An improvement of the Mk. I, however came too little too late.
 
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What about it?
Well I was thinking that to go with their Francophone influences and since their military hadn't really modernized like their Union rivals the common Confederate infantry man would be wearing grey trousers during the start of the war.


Next up much like in the book the Confederates would be sporting a British inspired Butternut/Khaki overshirt. Though the officer uniforms would be slightly more elaborate during the start of the war.


Followed by them having a slightly more modern version of the forage cap harkening back to the heritage of their grandfathers. Though the majority of them being Khaki instead of grey, often with their rank insignia being on them.




Finally most of Soldiers would be wearing British and OTL American styled combat boots from the same era.
 
I am most definitely on-board with the standard-issue CS Army headgear being a kepi (if nothing else this helps visibly set them apart from their Northern antagonists); I do feel that particoloured uniforms (with some elements in grey & others in butternut) ought to be limited to members of the militia, as the text of Miss Anne's hunt for the Marshlands Marauders explicitly notes that mix of colours distinguishes them from Regulars.

I suggest this with one caveat - it might be a good idea to give Southern Generals/General Staff officers a uniform distinct unto themselves (as was, I believe, the case with the French Generals of 1914) and making that uniform grey would seem to make a great deal of sense (suggesting minds caught up in the Noble Tradition of the 19th Century); this idea is based on the impression that the Confederate Army has an elitist hierarchy in a way the US Army has largely dispensed with.
 
Now here is a thought that technically ought to fit the essential purpose of this thread, but might also be described as a tangent; in an alternative history of timeline-191 where Jake Featherston is cheated of his Triumph at the polls and declares War on his domestic political opponents along with the rest of his Stalwart followers (and the local progressives, moderates & small-c conservatives stand slightly more than a snowball's chance in Hell of defeating him), how should the uniforms & equipment of Featherston's followers differ from the armaments & field kit carried by those upholding the Administration?

I tend to think of this as the 'Confederate Civil War in 1934' timeline and may actually have left a thread outlining some thoughts on the subject (with a good deal of help from bguy) lying around somewhere in this forum; if anyone is interested in a more detailed background, I would be happy to link to it.:)
 
Here are some of my "other" Confederate Fighters

Schofield F-38.png

The Schofield F-38 (which I made by mating the tail of the Gloster Gauntlet to an Ambrosini SAI.207)

The F-38 fighter was the Schofield Motor Company's response to a 1938 requirement made by the Confederate Air Force for a cheaper alternative of the Hound Dog fighter. The F-38 was built mostly from wood and canvas, which was easier for mass production compared to the all metal Hound Dog. Equipped with a Stovall SB-33 engine and two 7.7mm Tredegar Machine-Guns. The plane would be accepted into service in late 1940 and by Operation Blackbeard, 133 fighters would be in the CS Air Force inventory in the air defense role. The weakness of the fighter became obvious when the Union Air Force launched bombing raids into the Confederacy in 1941 when the F-38 proved to be too slow and sluggish in it's role of intercepting the Union Bombers. In September of 1941, the F-38 was ingloriously withdrawn to 2nd Line duties such as target tow. 42 airframes would be transferred to the Mexican, where it would prove to be equally unpopular with the Mexicans.

Schofield F-387.gif

The Schofield F-387 (which is an Ambrosini SAI.403 with a Rolls Royce Merlin Engine)

With the failure of the F-38, the Schofield Design Team would return to the drawing board to make improvements to the design.Some of these was to add the Stovall SB-39 powerplant (which was a license copy of the Rolls Royce Merlin Engine) to the airframe and to increase the firepower of the airplane with two Ferguson 13.1mm Heavy Machine-Guns and a single Hispano Suiza 20mm autocannon. The first improved fighter, the F-384, first took flight in March of 1943 and it shown to be a far superior aircraft when compared to the earlier F-38. After several modifications, the much improved F-387 would enter production in late September of 1943. The new fighter would meet it's expectations and would prove to be cheaper than the Hound Dog owing to it's mixed material construction due to the worsening war situation. By war's end, only 502 of the F-387 fighters would enter service but only less than 350 would see combat service due to the shortage of aviation fuel and the numerically superior Union Air Force. Most historians all agree that the F-387 fighters like any other late war Confederate aircraft would be too little too late to save the Confederacy from ultimate defeat.
 
Now here is a thought that technically ought to fit the essential purpose of this thread, but might also be described as a tangent; in an alternative history of timeline-191 where Jake Featherston is cheated of his Triumph at the polls and declares War on his domestic political opponents along with the rest of his Stalwart followers (and the local progressives, moderates & small-c conservatives stand slightly more than a snowball's chance in Hell of defeating him), how should the uniforms & equipment of Featherston's followers differ from the armaments & field kit carried by those upholding the Administration?

I tend to think of this as the 'Confederate Civil War in 1934' timeline and may actually have left a thread outlining some thoughts on the subject (with a good deal of help from bguy) lying around somewhere in this forum; if anyone is interested in a more detailed background, I would be happy to link to it.:)
I'd imagine they'd likely be in similar uniforms and equipment to those of the regular CS military, just with more overt emblems and symbols to differentiate themselves. While the core of the Stalwarts would no doubt be in militarized versions of their specific uniforms, (essentially Brownshirts outfitted for combat, with Webbing and so forth) many of the party's members would be ordinary people. maybe some GW1 veterans might pull out their old uniforms?
 
A-38 Hound Dog G-2.png

A depiction of the Hughes A-38 Hound Dog G-2 from the 1st Fighter Squadron, Battle of Richmond, circa 1944.

In April of 1943, the Hound Dog fighter would be upgraded with the locally made copy of the Rolls Royce Merlin Engine known as the Stonewall SB-39. The first production variant to be equipped with the engine was the F-5 variant which entered service in June of 1943. The new engine along with the addition of two Hispano Suiza 20mm Autocannons in the wings and one (with an additional two 13.1mm Fergunson HMGs in the wings) through the propeller cap made the aircraft much more potent and increased it's performance over the earlier variants which had the Lincoln LMB-22 engine. Union Intelligence had initially mistook the plane as a new Confederate Warplane before determining that it was in fact and upgraded Hound Dog. The production variants of this new Hound Dog were the F-5 (400 airframes), F-6 (853), F-10 (871), F-11 (633) F-12 (910), F-13 (1,072) G-1 (690), G-2 (744), G-3 (504), G-4 (424), and G-8 (362), totaling to 6,592 planes manufactured in total. The later G-2 to G-8 variants were essentially simplified designs which were aimed at making the plane easier to build. In the last months of the war, the Hound Dogs were finding themselves in a increasingly dire situation as the aviation fuel and qualified pilots was dwindling while the Union Fighters outnumbered them 8 to 1. During the war, the Imperial Mexican Air Force would acquire a total of 628 of these late model fighters for the Air Force and would operate them until 1953 due to their age and a lack of spare parts. Texas also inherit 365 Hound Dogs for their Post-War Air Force (though they would only operate 40 aircraft while the rest were used as spare parts as all of the inherited airframes varied in condition) which the Hound Dog would soldiered on until 1947.
 
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A depiction of the Hughes A-38 Hound Dog G-2 from the 1st Fighter Squadron, Battle of Richmond, circa 1944.

In April of 1943, the Hound Dog fighter would be upgraded with the locally made copy of the Rolls Royce Merlin Engine known as the Stonewall SB-39. The first production variant to be equipped with the engine was the F-5 variant which entered service in June of 1943. The new engine along with the addition of two Hispano Suiza 20mm Autocannons in the wings and one (with an additional two 13.1mm Fergunson HMGs in the wings) through the propeller cap made the aircraft much more potent and increased it's performance over the earlier variants which had the Lincoln LMB-22 engine. Union Intelligence had initially mistook the plane as a new Confederate Warplane before determining that it was in fact and upgraded Hound Dog. The production variants of this new Hound Dog were the F-5 (400 airframes), F-6 (853), F-10 (871), F-11 (633) F-12 (910), F-13 (1,072) G-1 (690), G-2 (744), G-3 (504), G-4 (424), and G-8 (362), totaling to 6,592 planes manufactured in total. The later G-2 to G-8 variants were essentially simplified designs which were aimed at making the plane easier to build. In the last months of the war, the Hound Dogs were finding themselves in a increasingly dire situation as the aviation and able pilots was dwindling while the Union Fighters outnumbered them 8 to 1. During the war, the Imperial Mexican Air Force would acquire a total of 628 of these late model fighters for the Air Force and would operate them until 1953 due to their age and a lack of spare parts. Texas also inherit 365 Hound Dogs for their Post-War Air Force (though they would only operate 40 aircraft while the rest were used as spare parts as all of the inherited airframes varied in condition) which the Hound Dog would soldiered on until 1947.
Nice. :cool:
 
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