TL-191: Featherston's Finest - Uniforms, Weapons, and Vehicles of the CSA and Freedom Party

Discussion in 'Alternate History Books and Media' started by Alterwright, Aug 31, 2018.

  1. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Location:
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    Confederate Fleet and Cruiser Submarines

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    CSS Shark class Fleet Submarine = Same as the OTL Royal Navy T class Submarine
    In late 1938, the Admiralty would authorize the construction of 15 subs of a new class for it's Blue Water Submarine Force. Weighing in 1,290 tons surfaced and 1,560 tons submerged and has 6 bow torpedo tubes and 4 external torpedo tubes. The first boat in the class, the CSS Shark, was launched in April of 1939 and commissioned in August of that year. The last boat of the first group, the CSS Sailfish, would be commissioned into service in January of 1940. The following month, the Admiralty would order 20 more boat in the class, which would be the 2nd group of the class. This was known as the Tarpon group after the first boat of it, the CSS Tarpon. Throughout the war, these ships would prove to be a problem to the Union Navy, either launching torpedo attacks on Union ships and also laying mines in Union controlled waters. Of all of the 35 boats constructed, only the CSS Shark, Dolphin, and Marlin survived the war, with the Shark and Marlin being transferred to the Texan Navy and the Dolphin being retained by the Union Navy as a training submarine until 1951, when it was sold to ship breakers in Baltimore.

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    CSS Barracuda class Large Fleet Submarine
    Throughout the 1920s, the Confederate Admiralty was throwing around ideas for large fleet submarines, which were submarines that could operation deep in the Atlantic for long periods. In 1929, the final design, Project 227, was made, with six forward torpedo tubes, four rear torpedo tubes, two deck guns and two 37mm AA guns. In all, two boats would be ordered and laid down in December of 1929 and the first boat, the CSS Barracuda, was commissioned in June of 1931, followed by the CSS Wahoo in the following month. By the beginning of the 2nd Great War, the two submarines would operating off the coast of New Jersey and New York, laying sea mines and attacking enemy shipping. However, the Wahoo would be lost off the coast of New Jersey on September 11th, 1941 to Union Coastal Patrol Aircraft, which attacked it and sunk it with depth charges, kill all aboard. A month later, the CSS Barracuda would sink the Union tanker, SS Lake Huron and cargo ships, SS Oregon City and SS Harvard off the coast of Long Island and the Armed Trawler, USS Pawnee. In March of 1942, while operating off the coast of the Maine, would strike a naval mine and sink with all hands.

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    CSS Croaker class Large Fleet Submarine
    Following the commissioning of the Barracuda class of large fleet submarines, the Admiralty would order a modified version of the class to be designed. In 1934, the design, Project 1134a, would be ordered with 6 boats. In May of 1936, the CSS Croaker was launched and was commissioned in October of 1936, which was followed by the CSS Angelfish, Salmon, Flounder, and Trumpetfish would enter service, with the final planned member of the class, the CSS Minnow being completed to a modified design. Throughout the war, the class was used in many roles, from attacking enemy ships, mine laying, and even being used for supplying Confederate Forces in Haiti. The CSS Salmon would notably sink the Union submarine USS Gato with her deck guns in a duel with that sub on July 16th, 1942 in the Atlantic near Bermuda. The Flounder on September 17th, 1943 would attempt to torpedo the Union carrier USS Enterprise, but was sunk by it's destroyer escort, the USS Samuel B. Roberts. At war's end, only the CSS Salmon would survive when it was surrendered at the main Confederate submarine base at Fort Lauderdale Florida. It was eventually sold for scrap metal in Miami in April of 1945. During the war, the CSS Salmon and Trumpetfish would be used to carry Confederate Frogmen in August of 1942 to make attacks on docked Union ships at port.

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    CSS Minnow, Aircraft Submarine
    During it's construction, the Admiralty would order that the CSS Minnow be built to a modified design, which was to be an aircraft carrying submarine with a stowage for an airplane and a ramp for the plane to take off from. After it's commissioning in 1937, the CSS Minnow would be used to test the concept of an aircraft carrier submarine, in which they would prove successful. However, the CSS Minnow would remain the only aircraft submarine in Confederate Service as Featherson prevented the construction of more aircraft carrying subs. During the war, the Minnow would use her Hughes V-36 Seal scout plane to scout out enemy convoys for Confederate submarines. In August of 1943, the Minnow would be ordered to converted into a cargo submarine with her Seal scout plane and the launch ramp be removed. Until October of that year, the Minnow would be used to transport crucial supplies to Confederate Forces in Haiti. Then on October 14th, while running on the surface near Cuba and returning to it's home base of Fort Lauderdale, the Minnow was attacked by Union Navy fighter bombers and was sunk, with ten of her crew members being rescued by the frigate CSS McCoy. The Minnow's V-36 Seal was eventually found by the Union Army in a warehouse in Florida in September of 1944, and is now preserved at the Museum of the United States Air Force in Dayton, Ohio.

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    CSS Catfish class Fleet Submarine
    In the early 1930s, the Confederate Admiralty would design a new class of fleet submarines for it's fleet, which consisted of four front and two rear torpedo tubes, and a single deck gun. The boats would be constructed from 1931 to 1934 in two batches of 25 each. Two boats would be lost before the war, with the CSS Guppy being lost due to mysterious circumstances off of Cuba in 1939 and the CSS Porcupinefish being declared a constructive loss following an explosion in the forward torpedo room in May of 1937 in Guantanamo, Cuba. Following an extensive investigation, it was determined that the explosion was used by human error. Throughout the war, the class would serve in the roles of both ship hunting and as mine layers. The most famous member of the class, the CSS Drum under the Skipper John Reynolds, sank 200,000 tons of Union shipping, which the CSS Drum proved be the top scoring Confederate sub of the war. It was ultimately captured at Fort Lauderdale in 1944 and was sunk as target practice by the Union Navy in 1946. In all, two more of the class, the CSS Ling and CSS Cobia would also survive the war, and were both transferred to the Texan Navy where they served until 1957, when they were scrapped in Brownsville. The Confederacy would also built 10 more ships of the class for the Mexican Navy, which served until the late 1950s.

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    CSS Bonefish class Submarine
    After the First Great War, the Confederacy would be banned from owning submarines for it's navy. However in the early 1920s, the Confederate Admiralty would begin considering on getting new submarines for it's navy. The Confederacy would also construct some submarines for the navies of China, Siam, and Venezuela under a Front Company in Portugal. The ultimate design chosen was pretty much identical to the class built for the Royal Siamese Navy, with four forward and one rear torpedo tubes and a single deck gun. Four of these new boats for the CSN would be built in Portugal and four more built at the Mobile Naval Arsenal. While under construction, the cash strapped Confederate Navy would sell two of the submarines to the Greek Navy, which would serve in the Royal Hellenic Navy until the late 1940s. The first boat, CSS Bonefish would be launched at Lisbon in 1927 and be commissioned in 1928, and the remainder of the class would be completed in 1928. The class serve the frontline Confederate Submarine Fleet until 1938 when they were re delegated to service as training submarines. In the training role, the submarines would operate out of Mobile in the Gulf of Mexico until 1944 when they were evacuated to Tampa when the Union Army approached the city. Following the war, four of the submarines would be scrapped at Mobile while the rest were disposed as target practice by the Union Navy in the Atlantic in 1945.

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    CSS Spearfish class Submarine
    The Confederate Admiralty would order 30 submarines in a new class as part of their Modernization Plan of 1936. These boats were to be equipped with six forward and two aft torpedo tubes and a single deck gun on the conning tower. The first 10 boats would be laid down at the United Steel Shipyard in New Orleans in the spring of 1937 while more would be laid down at the Mobile Naval Arsenal and the Charleston Electric Boat Company shipyard in Charleston in the summer of that year. The first boat, CSS Spearfish, would be launched on August 9th, 1937 and would be commissioned in December of that year. The final boats would be commissioned into the fleet in the Spring of 1938. In July of 1937, the Admiralty would order 25 more boats of the class, which the first boats would be launched in May of 1938 and be commissioned later that year. Like with all Confederate Fleet Submarines during the war, the Spearfish class would be used for many different uses and saw plenty of service. In 1938, the Mobile Shipyard would constructed 10 of the boats for the Mexican Navy and 10 for the Siamese Navy, and in late 1940, Venezuela, Chile, Spain, and Persia each would also order 10 of these boats from the Confederacy, but when war began, would be impressed into the Confederate Navy. During the war, the class would be the only Oceangoing Submarine to be built beyond August 2nd, 1942 as these boats were the cheapest and easiest to construct, as a result, 59 of the boats would be constructed and commissioned as the D-2 subclass. A total of 144 of the boats would be used by the Confederacy during the 2nd Great War, which many of the survivors would be used by the Union Navy as training vessels all the way up to the early 1960s. The CSS Lionfish would be notable as to being destroyed by the Union sub USS Sturgeon near the coast of Long Island in November of 1943 in the only instance of underwater sub on sub battle in Naval History. Today only two of them survive to this day, one in Siam and one in Jacksonville Florida, the ex CSS D-31.

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    CSS Tyrannosaurus, Cruiser Submarine = OTL Surcouf Cruiser Submarine
    In the early 1930s, the Confederate Admiralty would have a fascination of constructing so-called "Underwater Cruisers" and "Underwater Battleships." So much so, that they would order from the United Steel Shipyard in 1932 a large sized submarine of the Project 1446 specification. That specification called for the submarine to be armed with two 8' guns, 6 forward and four rear torpedo tubes, and to also feature a hanger for an airplane. The Admiralty decided that the naming convention for Cruiser Submarines to be of Dinosaur names, thus breaking from the tradition of naming subs after fish. When launched in 1934, the boat would be named the CSS Tyrannosaurus and was commissioned in March of 1936. The scout plane was originally a modified Talbot T-31 scout plane, but in 1937, would be replaced by a Hughes V-36 Seal scout plane. Despite seeing significant use throughout the war and sinking 39 Union ships, only two of them would be sunk by the CSS Tyrannosaurus' guns, they were merchant ship SS Columbia off Long Island in 1942 and the minesweeper USS Tornado in the Bahamas in 1941. The Tyrannosaurus would ultimately be surrendered at Tampa Bay in 1944, and was thoroughly examined by the USN until was sold for scrap in 1947.

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    CSS Spinosaurus class Cruiser Submarine
    After the commissioning of the CSS Tyrannosaurus, the Admiralty would begin design studies for a potential follow on design. The final design would consist of six forward and four rear torpedo tubes, but it's most powerful weapons were to be dual mount 8' gun turrets. The first boat was laid down on September 7th, 1938 and five more would be laid down afterwards. In April of 1941, the CSS Spinosaurus would be launched, which was followed by the CSS Triceratops, Brontosaurus, and Allosaurus being launched, while two others had their construction slowed down and finally suspended in August of 1942. Only the CSS Spinosaurus would commissioned as it was originally designed while it's sisterships would be modified into Supply Submarines during their construction (though the Triceratops and Allosaurus were completed. During the Spinosaurus' career, the boat only sank three enemy vessels, two merchant ships and one destroyer escort, the USS Mueller, with one of the merchant ships being sunk by it's 8' guns. Then in April of 1943, the Spinosaurus was re-designated as a gunnery training vessel. During the fight for the island of Haiti, both the Triceratops and the Allosaurus were used to re-supply Confederate forces on the island, and the Triceratops would be sunk by the Union destroyer USS Edson on August 26th, 1943. The Allosaurus was also lost when it was destroyed in a Union bombing raid of the Submarine Base at Fort Lauderdale on March 28th, 1944 while being restocked to resupply Confederate forces in Cuba. The CSS Spinosaurus would be scuttled by her crew at the Port of Houston on April 30th, 1944 as Union troops and Texan rebels approached the city, and was raised in 1945 and subsequently broken up. The two incomplete hulls would be broken up on there slipways after the war in Mobile. The incomplete CSS Brontosaurus would also be broken up after being inspected by the Union Navy in 1947 at Mobile Alabama.
     
    Last edited: Dec 1, 2019
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  2. Soundwave3591 Active Member

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    Sep 25, 2019
    Definitely interesting designs, I see a lot of French influence, But Why would they name both cruisers and battleships after states?

    as to the CSS Bonefish, I don't know if Featherston would want to be digging up memories of Roger Kimball while he's trying to secretly rearm...
     
  3. Rorke Generic Beer

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    @S. Marlowski Are you going to make one on destroyers? You should also do some on the Union Navy on the Yankee Joe thread
     
  4. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    I will make some destroyers, and I already made a Union Battleships in the Naval Forces of TL-191 thread.
     
  5. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Confederate Navy Destroyers

    William W. J. Kelly.gif
    CSS William W. J. Kelly class Destroyer
    In 1938, the Confederate Admiralty would order the construction of a class of ocean going destroyers meant to accompany the planned Jefferson Davis class Battleships deep into the Atlantic. The said class (Project 644) was to have 10 ships in it, which the armament was to be three dual mount turrets of automatic 5' guns, two quad tubed torpedo launchers, and numerous small caliber AA guns. The first four ships would be laid down at the Charleston Electric Boat Company on August 1, 1938, two more would be laid down at Norfolk on September 4, 1938, and the last four laid down at the Mobile Naval Arsenal on September 10, 1938. The first ship, CSS William W. J. Kelly was launched on June 19th, 1940 and commissioned on July 26th, 1941, the other members of the class would be the Rourke, James A. Peterson, and Paul S. Kinsley from Charleston, the CSS Thompson and Robert M. Jackson from Norfolk, and finally Xavier C. LePoint, Cox, Garcia, and Timothy W. Brown from Mobile. Throughout the war, the class would see heavy use, and only two of the ships, CSS Thompson and CSS Rourke would survive the war, with the remainder being lost during the war either to enemy action, friendly fire (as was the case with the CSS Garcia when she was sunk by Confederate Air Force Asskickers in late 1943), or were damaged beyond repair (CSS Cox and Robert M. Jackson would both be damaged during the Superbombing of Charleston, which both of them would be abandoned and eventually be scuttled in 1945.) The CSS Thompson would be retained by the US Navy as the USS Thompson and used until 1954 as a training vessel. While the CSS Rourke was awarded to Texas and renamed the Crockett, which served with the Texan Navy until 1962, when she was donated for preservation as a Museum Ship in Houston, and is now the only surviving Confederate surface warship.

    R. J. Vickers.gif
    CSS R. J. Vickers class Destroyer
    Around the same time as Project 644 was being considered for construction, the Admiralty would authorize the construction of the 14 ships belonging to a class of destroyers that were designed for operations in the Caribbean. The ships were to constructed at both the United Steel Shipyard and the Galveston Shipyard. The class was to be built to the specification of Project 455, which was to be armed with three single mount 5' guns, two triple torpedo tubes, one 40mm AA gun, and two 20mm AA guns. The first ship, CSS R. J. Vickers, was launched on April 9th, 1940 and was commissioned on March 29th, 1941. When the 2nd Great War commenced, three ships of the class, the Vickers, Onslow, and William T. Glassell would be completed, the Glassell was at New Orleans whereas the other two members were at the Bahamas. The CSS Onslow would be lost at the Bahamas when she struck a naval mine near Chub Cay while carrying some Marines to secure the island. The other ships of the class would be the Richard S. Smith, Morris, Rawlings, Terry M. Dorlitz, Howard Kiss, Hammond, Truxtun, Thomas B. Huger, Randall L. Lowell, James P. Anderson, and Edward Hubbard. The ships would see service throughout the war, many of them would be sent out to the Atlantic, an area of where they were not designed to operate in. All of them would be lost during the war, the Edward Hubbard and Thomas B. Huger would both be lost on June 1st, 1944 in the last surface engagement of the war.

    Eagle.gif
    CSS Eagle class Destroyer
    In 1935, the Confederate Admiralty would 8 destroyers under the Project 606 specification, which was similar in all respects to the British D & E class destroyers* that were being constructed at the time. The original armament of the destroyers were three single mount 5' guns, two triple mount torpedo launchers, one 25mm AA gun, and four 13mm AA machine guns, the armament would be upgraded during before and during the war. In addition to the 8 ships being built for the Confederacy, 4 ships would additionally be constructed for the Imperial Mexican Navy starting in 1936. The first ship would launched in May of 1937 as the CSS Eagle, which it's sisterships would the Hawk, Falcon, Vulture, Condor, Buzzard, Osprey, and Kingfisher, all of the ships would be commissioned into the fleet by June of 1939. In March of 1941, the CSS Hawk and CSS Condor would be modified to carry mine laying equipment as they were reclassified as Minelaying Destroyers. These two ships would go on to lay mine in the water around Norfolk, Virginia and also along the coastlines of Delaware, Virginia, the Bahamas, North Carolina, and South Carolina. The other destroyers would serve in various operations during the war, such the invasion of the Bahamas and Bermuda. From October of 1942 onwards, the CSS Falcon would be posted to Tampa, Florida where it protected the harbor until war's end. The CSS Falcon, Hawk, and Osprey would be the only members of the class to survive the war. Which the Falcon would be scrapped in Delaware in late 1944 whereas the Hawk and Osprey would both be used to clear mines in the American Coastal Waters as part of the Confederate Mine Clearing Force from late 1944 to the summer of 1947. Afterwards, both of them would be sold to shipbreakers in Mobile Alabama.
    * = Similar to the OTL G&H class Destroyer

    John Y. Beall.gif
    CSS John Y. Beall class Destroyer
    In 1932 following a debate within the Admiralty, it was decided to construct two different classes of destroyers with 10 ship for each class. One of them, was Project 27, which was to be armed with 5 single mount 5' guns, two triple mount torpedo tubes, and several smaller caliber AA guns. The first ships would be laid down at the Mobile Naval Arsenal in September of 1932 with the first ships being launched in July of 1935, and first commissioning in 1937. The class members were the John Y. Beall, Johnathan R. Walsh, Tuner Ashby, Douglas H. Cooper, Melvin P. Dickerson, Herman Cumming, Alfred K. Powers, Robert R. Carter, Emerson, and Judah P. Benjamin. Throughout their carriers, the ships would serve with the Confederate Atlantic Fleet, in which they would battle the Union Navy during the Battle of the Atlantic throughout the war. The sole surviving member of the class was the CSS Robert R. Carter, which was captured with the other Confederate Ships at Tampa Bay at war's end. It was used by the Confederate Mine Clearing Force as a minesweeper tender until June of 1947, when it was ultimately sold for scrapping in Delaware.

    Pickett.gif
    CSS George E. Pickett class Flotilla Leader
    In 1932, the Confederate Admiralty would order into construction the Flotilla Leader class following the Project 1233 specification. The armament included 4 single mount 5' guns, two triple mount torpedo tubes, three 25mm AA guns, and four 13mm AA machine guns. The first ship, the CSS George E. Pickett would be launched on December 29th, 1934 and would be commissioned on November 30th, 1936. It's sisterships would be the Clifton R. Beckingridge, Franklin A. Gutterborough, Albert Pike, John H. Kelly, and Thomas S. Schofield. Like the John Y. Beall class, these were ships that were intended to serve in the Atlantic alongside larger Confederate Warships. One ship would be constructed for the Imperial Mexican Navy starting in 1934 and delivered in 1938, but as a Large Destroyer. Sometime during the summer of 1940, all of the ships in the class were reclassified as destroyers. Throughout the war, the ships would see service and would be upgraded. A depiction of the CSS George E. Pickett shown here shows her following her February of 1943 refit, which had one of her torpedo launchers removed, her AA capacity increased, and also equipped with new anti-submarine radar. The same ship would be notable for single handedly taking one the Union light cruiser USS Detroit and causing severe damage to the cruiser. Ultimately, the CSS G.E. Pickett would be captured at Tampa Bay at War's end along with her sistership the J. H. Kelly, and they would both be scrapped at Mobile in the late 1940s.

    Tucker.gif
    CSS Tucker class Destroyer = Same as the OTL Wicher class Destroyer of the Polish Navy
    Following the First Great War, the Confederate Destroyer Fleet would be reduced to 13 ships to meet the terms of the Treaty of Philadelphia of 1918. During the 1920s, the Confederate Admiralty would be making designs for a new generation of destroyers for it's fleet. The ultimate destroyer design would Project 438, which was similar in design and specification to the French Bourrasque class Destroyer. Construction of these destroyers would begin in May of 1929 with a total of 12 ship being ordered, 5 each being constructed at the United Steel Shipyard and the Mobile Naval Arsenal, the remainder being constructed at the Galveston Shipbuilding Company, a subsidiary of the Tredegar Steel Works. The first ship, the CSS Tucker, would be launched on April 1st, 1931 and be commissioned on July 4th, 1932. The following ships would be the Powell, Horace L. Hunley, James P. Simms, John Thatcher, Thomas D. Squire, Kingston, Andersen, William Steele, Glenn, Rodger Sanders, Ezra L. Lawson, and Arnold J. Holmes. In addition, the Confederacy would also build 5 of these ships for the Mexican Navy and two for the Brazilian Navy. During the 2nd Great War, 6 of the ships within the class would operate as escorts for merchant ships to defend against Union submarines while the other half would serve in offensive operations. In June of 1942 while operating off the coast of Delaware, three of the ships, the Andersen, Glenn, and James P. Simms would be lost as a result of both miscommunication and general confusion while they sailed in heavy fog, which resulted them in being ingloriously destroyed by Confederate Sea Mines. Later that month, the CSS Powell would be sunk alongside the CSS Alabama by the Union Battleship USS Montana. The remaining ships would all eventually be destroyed in the last weeks of the war while defending the coastal cities of Wilmington, New Orleans, and Mobile from advancing Union forces.

    Coyote.gif
    CSS Coyote class Light Destroyer
    In the years following the First Great War, the Admiralty was working on breaching the Naval Armaments Treaty forced upon it by the Union. One of the first warships to be built for the Confederate Navy was the Coyote class, which was based off of Late-War destroyer designs. The design called for two 4 inch main guns with two 3.7 inch guns to either side of the side, two 75mm M1915 AA guns, four 7.7mm AA machine-guns, and two twin torpedo launchers. By 1928, all 6 ships of the class, Coyote, Wolf, Jackal, Bear, Ferret, and Fox would all be commissioned. These ships would be reclassified as Light Destroyers upon the commissioning of the first ships of the Tucker class Destroyer in 1932. For most of the 2nd Great War, these destroyers would serve to protect and patrol the entrances of important harbors from Union submarines and motor torpedo boats. In 1944, these ships would make a futile effort to defend Confederate Waters from the much superior Union Navy. At war's end, two of the ships, the CSS Fox and CSS Ferret would survive the war, and would both be sold to scrap in 1945 to breakers in Galveston, Texas.

    Wrigley.gif
    CSS Wrigley class Torpedo Boat
    Following the First Great War and the Scuttling of the Confederate High Seas Fleet in the Bahamas, their destroyer fleet would be drastically be reduced in size. In planning in building it up again, the Confederate Admiralty would order the construction of 6 six ships following the Project 56 specification, was essentially a development of Wartime designs. The armament was to be two 95mm deck guns, a 75mm AA gun, four 7.7mm AA machine guns, and two dual torpedo launchers. Construction would start on this class in 1925 and the first ship would be launched in April of 1926 and commissioned in May of 1927. The ships in the class would the Wrigley, Allen Thomas, Joseph L. Hogg, George McPeak, Peter M. Davis, and Andrew Jones, and the ships would be classified as Torpedo Boats rather than as Destroyers. By late 1940, the Admiralty was considering of retiring them from service and disposing of them, but the outbreak of war would prevent this. During the war, these ships would be used to defend Confederate ports from attacks by Union submarines, and in the waning days of the Confederacy's existence, would be used in the desperate final defense of the country. After the end of the war, the Wrigley, George McPeak, and the Allen Thomas would be used as minesweeper by the Confederate Mine Clearing Force until June of 1947. In late 1947, the three old Torpedo Ships would be sold to ship breakers in Mobile Alabama.

    D-1.gif
    D-1 class Destroyer
    The Confederate Admiralty would authorize the construction of 16 ships of the D class of Destroyers in 1904. The original armament for the ships was a 3.7 inch main gun, a 75mm deck gun, and three dual torpedo launchers. During the First Great War, the class would see extensive service in the war, with the loss of 5 ships of the class to Union warships and one being sunk by a Sea Mine off the coast of Virginia. After war's end, the Confederacy would be allowed to retain 8 of the ships for it's navy. By the early 1930s, the ships would be withdrawn to secondary duties, such as harbor patrol, gunnery training, and guardship, evem the CSS D-4 was converted into a controlled target ship. When the 2nd Great War began in 1941, 5 of these ships would remain, and would be used as harbor patrol ships at Confederate ports. When the war ended, these would be broken up for scrap.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2019 at 6:03 PM
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  6. Soundwave3591 Active Member

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    Sep 25, 2019
    A counterpart to my US Battleships post in the Union counterpart to this forum:

    Battleships of the Confederate States Navy

    First Great War era


    North Carolina-class: (1910) North Carolina, Mississippi, Louisiana (The CSA's first Dreadnoughts, built to near-copies of the British HMS Dreadnought of 1907)

    Virginia-class (1912) Virginia, Tennessee, Kentucky (Improvements on the North Carolina-class, armed with 14-inch guns in 4 double turrets)

    Florida-class (1914) Florida, Georgia, South Carolina (Built to square off against the USN New York-class)

    Texas-class (1916) Texas, Sequoya, Alabama (Built in response to the Imperial German Bayern-class Superdreadnoughts, based on Queen Elizabeth-class)

    The Sonora-class Superdreadnoughts, (Sonora, Chihuahua, and Cuba) intended to take on the USN's Vermont-class, would be curtailed by lack of materials and professional construction workers, especially after the Black Socialist rebellion, and would be scrapped or sold off along with the rest of the CSA's Battlefleet under the terms of the Peace Treaty. CSS Florida would be given to Spain as part of the treaty, and would be renamed Cristobal Columbo to replace an 1890's vintage battleship. She would in fact serve the Spanish fleet until the 1960's, becoming the last Confederate Warship afloat by the time of her decommissioning.
    CSS Tennessee would be given to Brazil to bolster its battleship fleet, while CSS South Carolina would be given to Chile. Their names would revert to their pre-dreadnought predecessors, the only capitol warships the CSN was allowed to possess under the terms of the treaty.

    Second Great War era


    With the rise of the Freedom Party, Jake Featherston was under no illusions that war was inevitable. Indeed, he was actively working towards it. While his strategy revolved around operation Blackbeard and his assault into Ohio, he knew he needed to protect the CSA's vulnerable coastlines from US bombardment.
    Reaching out to his European Allies, particularly Actionist France, for support, he would acquire support from France's shipyards.

    Louisiana-class (1937) Louisiana, Sonora, Florida (Based on the French Richelieu class, though restructured to have a more conventional turret layout)

    The outbreak of the war would curtail further construction, but the CSA battlefleet would participate in the recapture of Bermuda from the USA, with the Louisiana bombarding US positions on the coast of the island.

    a proposed Alabama-class meant to counter the Idaho-class was begun, but the needs of the land war post-Pittsburg would take materials from Naval construction. Sonora would be caught in the Superbombing of Newport News shortly before the end of the war, while the Louisiana and Florida would be used in Superbomb tests in the Pacific following the end of the war.

    (as before, this is entirely my headcanon)
     
    Last edited: Dec 4, 2019
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  7. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    In my headcannon, the Confederate Admiralty decided to change up the naming conventions sometime in the 1920s.
     
  8. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    V36.png

    The Hughes V36 Seal, the mainstay advanced trainer of the Confederate Air Force, also used as a scout seaplane from large warships and submarines. Machines also sold to Mexico, Venezuela, Brazil, and Persia. In the last three months of the war, many of the Seals would be pressed into combat service as ad-hoc ground attack planes equipped either bombs, gun pods with twin M41 rippers in each pod, or six Barrel Buster rockets.
     
    Last edited: Dec 6, 2019 at 12:03 PM
  9. Pangur The Cat Donor

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    Seaplane? Where are the floats?
     
  10. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    I am going to have a make a version with the floats
     
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  11. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    V36 Naval.png
     
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  12. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Talbot T38 Racoon.png Talbot T38 Racoon Camo.png
    The Talbot T38 Raccoon, the Confederacy's primary twin engine multi-purpose airplane. Used in role such as transport, reconnaissance, communications, advanced trainer, light bomber, cargo, and in the civil configuration, an airliner to which it would excel at. Depicted here is a T38 BR-2 variant of the 17th Reconnaissance Wing near Pittsburgh, circa Autumn of 1942.

    I used a modified Caproni Ca 311 air-frame and added the tail section of a Lockheed Electra.
     
  13. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

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    Razorback.png
    My interpretation of the Confederate Razorback Bomber, which made with elements from the B-24 Liberator and the Handley Page Halifax bombers.
     
  14. Historyman 14 Well-Known Member

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    In the Land of the Ancients.
    [​IMG]

    With Jake Featherston's rearming of the CSA, he sought to ensure the dragging stalemate of the first Great War would not repeat itself in his new planned campaign against the Union. TO this end, he heavily invested in motorizing his forces for his upcoming invasion of Ohio.

    Operation Blackbeard was a resounding success tactically, driving straight to Lake Erie and cutting the US in half, throwing US Industry and logistics into chaos. However, the planned capitulation of the USA was not forthcoming, forcing Featherston to seek a second offensive to continue the tide of victory the CSA was riding.

    Operation Coalscuttle was therefore organized, as a plan to drive into the US' industrial heartland in southern Pennsylvania and cripple US war production. Key target of this offensive was the "Steel City" of Pittsburgh, center of US steel production and a crucial logistical hub.

    Little did the CSA realize, however, that the US had plans of their own...


    (Link.)
     
    Pangur, S. Marlowski and Undeadmuffin like this.
  15. Rorke Generic Beer

    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2017
    Location:
    In Your Fridge
    This reminds me of Junior General.
     
  16. cortz#9 Obrltnt of Kampfgruppe Seelöw

    Joined:
    Mar 14, 2011
    Another CS last ditch weapon of desperation and also one of the first attempt at an assault rifle.

    cb51a-sml.jpg
    Little is known about this rifle because of the chaos surrounding the CSA in its last days but it had some innovative features and was chambered for an intermediate 30 cal. round.
    Example displayed from the Union War Memorial museum.
     
    Historyman 14, Kol and S. Marlowski like this.
  17. Soundwave3591 Active Member

    Joined:
    Sep 25, 2019
    It IS Junior General.
     
  18. S. Marlowski Writer of an upcoming fantasy series

    Joined:
    Aug 22, 2018
    Location:
    Backwoods of Wisconsin
    [​IMG]

    What I think what the Confederate Hand Grenade might look like.