The Sun Will Rise: Mary I of England has a Son

1556

As the night fell in London, there were many an anxious lord and lady to be found prowling the streets, waiting anxiously for any news from Windsor castle where the Queen Regnant, Mary I was entering labour, after many months of excitement and trepidation, the Queen was finally entering childbirth. Her husband, Philip, King of Spain, and King Consort of England was by his wife’s side, or rather outside, pacing up and down desperate for news any sort of news. As the hours went by, many of the servants and the attendants began to lose hope, either the Queen would die, or her child would, the birthing was taking a long, long time, but eventually, at five in the morning on the 15th June, 1556, a boy was delivered to the Queen and King of England. The bells were rung and celebrations were planned, the boy, who was now heir to the throne, was named Philip after his father. The following months were a much joyous time for Queen Mary, having delivered an heir to the throne, she felt as if she was in a much stronger position, and as such, soon had her son confirmed as Duke of Cornwall and Earl of Chester, her husband, confident that his wife would survive without him there, left for Madrid, where he was needed to attend some council business. Mary at the age of forty, knew that this was her only child, and as such doted on her son, one writer, whose name has been lost to time, stated that ‘The Queen is wont to spent all hours of the day with her son, the Prince. Had she not the business of ruling to do, it is likely that she would.’ An indication of the love and affection Mary had for her son. It was during these few months following her son’s birth, that talk began of marrying Princess Elizabeth, the Queen’s sister to someone on the continent, amongst the proposed matches were Archduke Charles of Austria, a cousin to Mary’s husband. Mary, debating the validity of such a match, sent Thomas Howard the Duke of Norfolk to Vienna to assess whether such a marriage was possible, and as the year came to an end, she found herself waiting for a response. The public was on her side, for now.

On the other side of the world, in the land now known as Hindustan, the Second Battle of Panipat was raging. The forces of Hindu Emperor Vikramaditya, were waging war against the Mughal forces of Abu'l-Fath Jalal ud-din Muhammad Akbar, the heir of Humayun. Superior in numbers, and in skill, it was no surprise when the Hindu Emperor after ducking an arrow meant for him, led the charge that destroyed the Mughal army. Abu’l and his general Bairam Khan, fled the carnage, only to be captured a few hours later by scouts send by the Hindu Emperor. High on the scent of victory and determined to set an example, the emperor ordered both Abu’l and Bairam’s deaths, beheading his enemy himself. From there, he ordered his troops to move onto the rest of the Mughal strongholds, determined to end Muslim rule of India once and for all.
 
Hemuchandra (Vikramaditya was a sobriquet/title) wasn't a religious zealot, given that a) he served in the armies of Sher Shah Suri and b) had an army and government made up mainly of Northwest Indians and even Afghans, many if not most of whom were Muslim.

I'm sure one of his successors, once secure, might be able to move against Islam, but Hemchandra certainly couldn't, not without being overthrown.
 
Hemuchandra (Vikramaditya was a sobriquet/title) wasn't a religious zealot, given that a) he served in the armies of Sher Shah Suri and b) had an army and government made up mainly of Northwest Indians and even Afghans, many if not most of whom were Muslim.

I'm sure one of his successors, once secure, might be able to move against Islam, but Hemchandra certainly couldn't, not without being overthrown.
Note it was overthrow Muslim rule in India, not move against Islam.
 
He had Muslim vassals -- his initial goal was to inherit Sher Shah Suri's empire, not to outright remove Muslim elites (whom he used)
 
He had Muslim vassals -- his initial goal was to inherit Sher Shah Suri's empire, not to outright remove Muslim elites (whom he used)
Fair point, though let's be honest as with any leader, he's not exactly going to make that goal known straight off the bat.
 
A quick question, do you think Philip II would give the Spanish low countries to his second son?
Philip II seems to have had the idea floating around at various times in his rule when that was a possibility. However, the marriage contract between him and Mary I of England stipulated that their son would inherit England and the Spanish Netherlands, so I imagine that, in the case of having another son that, after Don carlos dies, that child would be his heir to Spain itself.
 
Philip II seems to have had the idea floating around at various times in his rule when that was a possibility. However, the marriage contract between him and Mary I of England stipulated that their son would inherit England and the Spanish Netherlands, so I imagine that, in the case of having another son that, after Don carlos dies, that child would be his heir to Spain itself.
Okay that is true, also, how likely do you think it is that Carlos dies, if he avoids the fall down the stairs that contributed quite a lot to his insanity?
 
He doesn't seem to have been that healthy regardless, so not for very long tbh. Maybe into his 30s. The fall just exacerbated what what already there. I think that, if he'd not had that fall Don Carlos would have at least made it to 30, maybe his 40s. He'd be married, if not to Elisabeth de Valois then to Anna of Austria. Not sure if he'd be extremely fertile but I imagine at least 1 or 2 kids out of him.
 
He doesn't seem to have been that healthy regardless, so not for very long tbh. Maybe into his 30s. The fall just exacerbated what what already there. I think that, if he'd not had that fall Don Carlos would have at least made it to 30, maybe his 40s. He'd be married, if not to Elisabeth de Valois then to Anna of Austria. Not sure if he'd be extremely fertile but I imagine at least 1 or 2 kids out of him.
Okay that does make sense, hmm him having a son and a daughter would make things very interesting.
 
Okay that does make sense, hmm him having a son and a daughter would make things very interesting.
If Philip chooses to marry him to Elisabeth he could father 3 children before his death: Stillborn Boy (c.1563), Philip (b.1666) and Maria Eugenia (b.1669). That way there's new blood in the family.
 
If Philip chooses to marry him to Elisabeth he could father 3 children before his death: Stillborn Boy (c.156:relievedface:, Philip (b.1666) and Maria Eugenia (b.1669). That way there's new blood in the family.
Hmm indeed makes sense :)
 
1557

Emperor Vikramaditya and his army, compromising many Afghan soldiers who had previously fought for the Suri army, marched on toward the remaining Mughal strongholds, especially the important city of Kabul. With the aid of the Afghan soldiers who knew the mountain passes relatively well, the emperor and his army were able to navigate them with relative ease. Approaching the city of Kabul from the south, they found the city under the control of Kamran Mirza who claimed to be holding the city for his nephew Mirza Muhammed Hakim, however, whether or not that was actually the case is still debated to this day. The siege of Kabul, began on the 11th of January, 1557 and was to last for some four months, before the citizens of Kabul lacking food, due to the encirclement of the Emperor’s forces, revolted and killed the guards and Kamran Mirza himself, opening the gates of the city to the Emperor and his men. The Emperor, happy with what the people had done, decided to spare them, and instead, decided to spend most of the remainder of the year within Kabul, consolidating his hold over the city, as well as moving out to bring some of the southern tribes of Afghanistan under his control. The year ended with the Emperor making his way back to Delhi having appointed a governor of Kabul and its neighbouring provinces.

In England, the year of 1557 sees a lot of talk going around of whether or not there would be war with France, indeed, King Philip had returned from Spain for this very reason. Spending many hours discussing the benefits that England could get from warring with France, including potentially getting more land within the country, using the suggestion of a invasion from Aquitaine as well as a force from Calais as basis for this. Mary, whilst being in favour of the war, harbouring similar ambitions to her father Henry VIII, in her hopes of regaining lands lost in France, knows that economically England is somewhat venturing on hard times, and compounded with the fact that her ministers are adamantly opposed to it, begins faltering over what can and cannot be done. It is only the Spanish Victory at the Battle of St Quentin, alongside a failed attempted by Thomas Stafford to try and capture Scarborough, that finally persuades both Mary and her advisors to move full steam ahead with a war on France. War is officially declared in late August, 1557, with Queen Mary entrusting a force under the command of old Earl of Arundel, which lands at Calais later that year, to begin plans for a two fronted war. A series of early victories over small French forces would add steam to the belief that this was the right choice. Furthermore, news comes from the Duke of Norfolk in Vienna, it seems that the imperial court is favourable to a marriage to Princess Elizabeth.
 
I think you should write 'Hemchandra' instead of 'Vikramaditya', as Vikramaditya was just his accompanying title that he took on his coronation as many Hindu rulers in the past,did.

Yeah and time to remove the Afghans completely has not yet come. Hemchandra had already begun this process right after his coronation but this process will have to be subtle otherwise you have a dangerous rebellion on hand as still most of the ruling class and a major part of the army was Afghan which was fanatically loyal to Hemchandra, and he surely wouldn't want his main support base against him.
 
I think you should write 'Hemchandra' instead of 'Vikramaditya', as Vikramaditya was just his accompanying title that he took on his coronation as many Hindu rulers in the past,did.

Yeah and time to remove the Afghans completely has not yet come. Hemchandra had already begun this process right after his coronation but this process will have to be subtle otherwise you have a dangerous rebellion on hand as still most of the ruling class and a major part of the army was Afghan which was fanatically loyal to Hemchandra, and he surely wouldn't want his main support base against him.
Oh, well I did think it would make more sense to refer to him by his regnal name, so as to avoid confusion later on. And indeed, no removal of the Afghans yet, but there will be teething problems as always.
 
Lady Elizabeth Tudor, the bastard and heretic sister of Queen Mary, doesn't have much market value - especially as Mary has produced a healthy, living male heir in this TL. I don't see the Hapsburgs wasting an Archduke on her, I don't see her consenting to a Catholic match, and I don't see Mary consenting to any marriage that would underline or secure her sister's royal status.
 
Lady Elizabeth Fitzroy, the bastard and heretic sister of Queen Mary, doesn't have much market value - especially as Mary has produced a healthy, living male heir in this TL. I don't see the Hapsburgs wasting an Archduke on her, I don't see her consenting to a Catholic match, and I don't see Mary consenting to any marriage that would underline or secure her sister's royal status.
FTFY

But yeah, I agree with what you said. Would Mary lock her up in a convent once it becomes clear her son will live to produce issue?
 
FTFY

But yeah, I agree with what you said. Would Mary lock her up in a convent once it becomes clear her son will live to produce issue?
Elizabeth was never surnamed FitzRoy - bastard children in Tudor England generally used their father's surname without difference.

I'm not sure she'd lock her up in a convent, but most likely keep her away from court living like a country lady, marry her off to some very very secondary Catholic lackey or bring her to court to serve her as a spinster lady-in-waiting.
 
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