Stonewall Jackson's Way: An Alternate Confederacy Timeline

What Timeline Should I Do Next?

  • Abandon the Alamo!

    Votes: 18 36.0%
  • We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists

    Votes: 26 52.0%
  • Old Cump and Pap

    Votes: 6 12.0%

  • Total voters
    50
I agree I hate it when the nit pickers arrive and try to drown out stories they dont like.
Nit pickers? The less someone knows about a subject the easier it is to pass something off on them as logical. If you write an alternate history you have an obligation to write something plausible. Gettysburg is frequently used as a departure point, because it's the most fames battle of the war, and is considered a turning point. It's not, the Confederacy was already in steep decline. Lee's invasion was a high risk move, who's strategic objective was to divert Union forces from Grant's campaign against Vicksburg, but it came too late, and had no chance of achieving it's objective. Union grand strategy was set in early 1862, was long in motion, and was at the moment of success. Lincoln was committed to controlling the Mississippi Valley, which would assure Union victory. He wasn't going to throw away victory in a 24 hour period, because he was panicked into a totally irrational move.

The depiction of the Battle of Gettysburg itself, isn't something to be taken seriously. The first day's described in nebulus terms with no indication of what roads units are taking, or what time they get there. At some point everyone on both sides just gets there, takes there positions, and starts fighting. I guess just because Jackson is alive the Confederates fight better. They attack, and capture all the high ground from Culps Hill, to the Round Tops, routing all Union forces before them, (He likes the word Rout). After being routed, and losing all the defensible ground they held, Meade decides to stand in the woods, and open fields behind the Fish Hook formed by the hills, and ridges, that the Confederates now hold.

instead of retreating to the strong defensive position at Pipe Creek, where he wanted to fight anyway he just stays in a vulnerable position. Then the Secretary of War in a fit of madness forces Halleck to send irrational orders, (in contravention of Presidential instructions) to Meade to attack at all costs, to recover hills Stanton never heard of the day before. At this point Meade becomes a moral jellyfish, and surrenders any sense of responsibility to his army, or his country. He blindly follows orders he knows can only end in disaster. So Stanton lost his mind, and Halleck, and Meade are morale cowards. This is supposed to be a good plot device?

The union is again routed, then routed again, (That's 3 routs) after the Union Cavalry is caught with it's pants down. More competent leaders transformed into morons. The remnants of the army is too routed to reform, they just run eastward, 30 miles to the burned out bridge at Wrightsville, repair it, cross the Susquehanna, and keep going another 100 miles, till they reach Philadelphia. I guess they just couldn't run anymore? So they run 130 miles with nobody chasing them. This is great military history.

So now Washington is in danger, but instead of calling for readily available reinforcements, the garrison is left on it's own, and the whole civil, and military leadership of the federal government gets on the first train to Philly. The garrison is route, that's 4 routs, and surrenders in mass. An incompetent is put in charge of the Army of the Potomac, and gets routed for a 5th time. After some other routs the war winds down with the Union politely waiting for the 1864 election to end the failed Lincoln Administration, so peace can again reign in America. Poor Honest Abe still gets a bullet in the head, such an emotional moment. Booth continues his acting career, and Dr. Mudd helps found John Hopkins University. Mary Surratt lives to be 99, and has 50 great grand children, one of whom becomes president of the CSA.

In the interests of peace The Union agrees to abandon all the territory of the 11 succeeded states their occupying. That's most of Tennessee, most of Arkansas, West Virginia, which had been admitted as state in the Union, most of Louisiana, a quarter of Mississippi, northern Alabama, the coastal regions of Virginia, North, and South Carolina, Georgia. and Florida. Continuing their self flagellation the United States concedes the federal capital, and the complete states of Maryland, Kentucky, and Missouri. As icing on the cake, and for no particular reason the United States gives the CSA the Oklahoma Territory, and the southern half of the Arizona Territory. Why didn't they give them Delaware, or would that just be too much? Oh yes the toughest issue, a new fugitive slave act. I'm glad the United States hung tough, and didn't agree to pay any reparations, or have it's citizens tried by a foreign government, the USA is a proud nation.

So then we're off too the races, as the CSA starts to industrialize, and become a respectable nation. Now that their free of Northern inference most of the fans think the CSA will settle it's racial, and other social, and economic problems equitable. After all equality, and egalitarianism were hallmarks of Southern Society, it was preached from the pulpit every Sunday, No just kidding, slavery was part of the divine order.

Now yes the Union might have lost the Battle of Gettysburg, I could easily write a plausible scenario were that happens. Writing that the Army of the Potomac is effectively destroyed is far less plausible, running to Philadelphia is ridicules. The Union effectively abandoning Washington, when it could be defended is completely implausible. Throwing the whole Union War Machine into reverse is absurd. Giving up on the war is crazy. Surrendering states that are still part of the Union is insane. Nitpicking is criticizing small details, or plot holes, that's not what I'm doing, I'm pointing out huge gaps, that destroy the plausibility of the whole story.

I give the RockofChickamauga credit for his historical research, and diligence in composing his story, I know it's not easy. His efforts will improve his writing style, for future works. I hope he continues writing on the board, and continues his historical research. I sincerely apologize for being so hard on you Rock. I guess I'm just an old curmudgeon. I think he wanted to write a story of the development of a victorious CSA, which is a difficult job, because it's such an unlikely event. A realistic point of departure is so hard come up with. I think you need a longer, and earlier chain of events. Gettysburg is a popular point, but it's really just too late in the game for the South to pull it off. Good luck Rock.
 
Although Stonewall Jackson's Way is far from over, it eventually will end, and due to all the of support I am receiving, I would like to create another timeline. I have three main ideas in my head, all pre-1900 and each with a varying degree of ideas for it. They are as follows:

Abandon the Alamo!: This TL would start with a Texas Revolution POD that seems fairly clear from the title. This is the one that would probably take the longest for me to make, and I like the least, as I am not an expert on the Texas Revolution. It probably would also have the most historical inaccuracy and lack of detail early on.

We are all Republicans, we are all Federalists: This timeline would focus on a POD in the aftermath of the Election of 1796. I like the idea of this one, and already have some of ideas of put down, but am not sure if I should create yet another Founding Father POD TL, as there seems to be plenty being created currently. Then again, this one would be quite different from the others

Old Cump and Pap: This timeline is probably my favorite of the group, and I have the most ideas for it. It would be another Civil War TL, but very different from Stonewall Jackson's Way. It would probably be the shortest of the three, but would have a major change in format from my current TLs, in that it would combine the history book writing style I currently use with scenes and dialogues amongst characters similar to The Killer Angels. In my opinion, it probably would be the best.

I will put up a poll to see what the viewers of this timeline think of the ideas. I will strongly consider the results of the poll when deciding what TL I will create next.
 
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Chapter Twenty-Eight: The U.S. Election of 1880
Chapter Twenty-Eight: The U.S. Election of 1880

The 1880 Republican National Convention
With the Election of 1880 approaching, it had become abundantly clear the William B. Hazen neither wanted, or was likely to receive, his party's renomination. A new man had to be chosen to lead the Republicans, and everyone expected a hard fought convention. At first, the convention had three main candidates. First was James G. Blaine, the man who had taken up the mantle of Republican leadership after the Civil War and had lead the party during their rise to prominence again. Despite this, many influential men, such as Roscoe Conkling, disliked Blaine, which hurt his chances. Second was Ulysses S. Grant, who some supported because he was a Midwestern war hero. Despite this, Grant's alleged drinking problem during the war, along with technically leading the U.S. Army during the time that the United States made peace with the CSA hurt his chances. Third and finally was John Sherman, who had returned to his seat as Senator from Ohio after beating incumbent Democrat Allen G. Thurman. While being a Midwestern did aid him, his recent return to political success and lack of a war hero reputation also seemed to hurt him. Eventually, the party settled on none of these candidates, and instead went with James Garfield, who was the Republican Conference Chairman in Congress, as he was a war hero, had a large amount of political experience, and very few enemies. The vice-presidential contest saw Secretary of the Navy John A. Logan, Indiana Representative Benjamin Harrison, and New York State Republican Executive Committee Chester Arthur all compete against each other. It appeared at first Logan might receive the nomination, but when he refused to criticize Hazen, the Republicans turned on him, and Conkling was able to gain enough support to see that Chester Arthur, the candidate he favored, received the nomination.

James Garfield and Chester Arthur
The Democratic Party, meanwhile, seemed to have recovered from their sudden fall from power, and were ready to challenge the divided Republican Party. Their three main candidates were former president and current Ohio Senator George H. Pendleton, former New York Governor Samuel Tilden, and Delaware Senator Thomas F. Bayard. Their convention would be deadlocked at first, and it would only break when supporters Pendleton were convinced to throw their votes to Bayard, which secured his nomination. Some wanted Tilden to receive the vice-presidential nomination, but their efforts would be thwarted by Bayard supporters, who saw to it that Samuel J. Randall, the Pennsylvania Representative and Leader of the House Democratic Caucus would receive it instead.

Thomas F. Bayard and Samuel J. Randall
In the wake of the recent political realignment the country had undergone, a new political party, the Gold and Silver Party, emerged. Though by no means having the amount of support of either the Republican or Democratic Party, the Gold and Silver Party had most assuredly entered the national stage, and was a national party. They favored returning to currency based on gold and silver instead of Greenbacks, as their name would imply. Despite not having the finances or heritage of the two main stream parties, the Gold and Silver Party would manage to secure two fairly well-known people to be their candidates. For president, they managed to convince the Governor of New York, Grover Cleveland, who was elected as a Democrat, to be their party's nominee. For their vice-presidential nomination, Benjamin F. Butler, the Civil War general and former Democratic Massachusetts representative would be their nominee.

Grover Cleveland and Benjamin Butler
The 1880 campaign season would be a hard fought one, with many personal and political attacks. The Republicans still attacked the Democrats as the party of corruption, and pointed out how Cleveland, the man the Democrats had chosen to be their candidate for governor due to his reputation of anti-corruption man, had turned against them. The Democrats attacked the Republicans for their political divisions, and noted how that even the president elected on their ticket, William B. Hazen, had grown disgusted with them. It is interesting to note that Hazen came out in favor of no candidate in this election. Meanwhile, the Gold and Silver Party focused more on advocating their policies rather than political attacks, and hoped to gain support in the Western states, where solid currency, rather than paper money, were still preferred. As the election continued, both the Republicans and the Democrats realized that the Gold and Silver Party might have been a bigger threat than they realized.

A Thomas Nast cartoon favoring neither the Republicans not the Democrats. It shows the Republicans walking towards chaos due to their divisions, and Democrats as men desiring power they did not earn through corruption and trickery
With the results came in, the election had gone to the Republicans, by large margin electoral vote wise, but narrowly popular vote wise. Garfield would secure 172 electoral votes, as opposed to Bayard's 74, and Cleveland's 15. Garfield would win Kansas, Nebraska, Iowa, Minnesota, Illinois, Wisconsin, Michigan, Indiana, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Connecticut, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Maine. Bayard would win Missouri, Kentucky, Delaware, New Jersey, and New York. Cleveland would win California, Oregon, Nevada, and Colorado. The popular vote, however, told a different story, with the Republicans barely securing Kansas and Nebraska from the Gold and Silver Party, and nearly losing several Midwestern states, including Ohio, Michigan, and Wisconsin to the Democrats. This election would show two things. First, that the Democratic Party had recovered from the recent allegations of corruption leveled against them, and were still a major threat, and that a new political force had entered the stage with the Gold and Silver Party, with it remaining to be seen if they could continue their momentum.
 

Odan-Urr

Banned
@TheRockofChickamauga : Keep up the great work. This is very interesting. Don't be discouraged by negative people. Personally, there are lots of timelines I've taken a look at that I didn't like. I just don't comment in them.

I vote for Abandon the Alamo. I wonder if the Texas Rebellion had been crushed (or was about to be) would the USA intervene, leading to an earlier war with Mexico?
 
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Chapter Twenty-Nine: The Garfield Presidency
Chapter Twenty-Nine: The Garfield Presidency

President James Garfield
As soon as Garfield entered office, it immediately became clear that Garfield would be able to function more efficiently than Hazen in the presidency. While Hazen was argumentative and made many rivals, Garfield was able to work well with others, retaining many of Hazen's cabinet members. Garfield's cabinet would include all three men who had challenged him during the Republican National Convention, and he was able to mold them into an effective board of advisors. One of the first things Garfield did when he entered office was to see to it that the 13th Amendment, which finally outlawed slavery in the United States despite only less then a thousand slaves still were in the country, was passed. The amendment had been started during Hazen's term, but he had stonewalled it both to spite his rivals in Congress and he feared it might enrage the CSA, who he was trying to improve relations with. Garfield also helped in the passing of 14th and 15th Amendments, which gave defined citizenship and ensured voting equality based on race under the law respectively.

An photograph of some of the last slaves left in the USA. Taken in Kentucky, with the white man in the foreground being one of Garfield's personal Black Guards he sent out to ensure the slaves were freed
Despite his progressive acts in terms in civil rights, Garfield still maintained his predecessor's opinion in terms of relations with the South. Working with CSA President Longstreet, Garfield would help organize several more treaties of friendship between the two nations, although they were not as sweeping as the ones of Hazen and Gordon. This included expanding free trade with the CSA and most of the rest of the Western Hempshire, in which Garfield was heavily aided by Secretary of State James G. Blaine. Garfield would also work with Secretary of the Navy John A. Logan to help renovate and expand the U.S. Navy as part of the a program he started with the CSA in which they would take the chief role of patrolling the Western Hempshire's oceans.

The USS Galena, one of the new ships create during the Garfield Administration
Despite his immense popularity, some people still disliked Garfield. Most of the hatred Garfield received was due to his support of anti-corruption and anti-patronage laws, which were viewed by many low ranking politicians as the just rewards of the winning president. All of this anger reached a boiling point in 1882. While speaking with Secretaries Blaine and Logan on work to meeting concerning free trade and the navy, a crazed office seeker, Charles Guiteau, would walk up to them a pull out a revolver. Quickly, one of the Black Guards accompanying Garfield would take down Guiteau, and managed to hold him down until the police arrived. Nonetheless, Garfield was still shaken by the experience, and personally stayed and watched until Guiteau was secured by the police and arrested.

Charles J. Guiteau, attempted assassin
Despite having a successful presidency, and being beloved by the general public, Garfield had made a powerful rival during his presidency. Garfield and his anti-patronage, pro-good relations with the CSA wing of the party would find opposition from Roscoe Conkling, who lead the pro-patronage, pro-heightened tensions or war of reconquest against the CSA faction of the Republicans, who believed the only way to clear themselves both in the eyes of the people and future generations was to eliminate the biggest mark of shame on their party. When the Republican National Convention of 1884 came around, it would decide which of the two factions would control the party.

Vice-President Arthur, standing at left, walking into argument between Garfield, seated at right, and New York Senators Thomas C. Platt, seated at left, and Roscoe Conkling, standing at right​

Garfield and his cabinet:
President: James A. Garfield
Vice-President: Chester A. Arthur
Secretary of State: James G. Blaine
Secretary of the Treasury: George F. Edmunds
Secretary of War: Ulysses S. Grant
Attorney General: David Davis
Postmaster General: Henry L. Dawes
Secretary of the Navy: John A. Logan
Secretary of the Interior: John Sherman
 
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Chapter Twenty-Nine: The Garfield Presidency

President James Garfield
As soon as Garfield entered office, it immediately became clear that Garfield would be able to function more efficiently than Hazen in the presidency. While Hazen was argumentative and made many rivals, Garfield was able to work well with others, retaining many of Hazen's cabinet members. Garfield would even return to seeming political exile David Davis back into the spotlight with his appointment as Attorney General. Garfield's cabinet would include all three men who had challenged him during the Republican National Convention, and he was able to mold them into an effective board of advisors. One of the first things Garfield did when he entered office was to see to it that the 13th Amendment, which finally outlawed slavery in the United States despite only less then a thousand slaves still were in the country, was passed. The amendment had been started during Hazen's term, but he had stonewalled it both to spite his rivals in Congress and he feared it might enrage the CSA, who he was trying to improve relations with. Garfield also helped in the passing of 14th and 15th Amendments, which gave defined citizenship and ensured voting equality based on race under the law respectively.

An photograph of some of the last slaves left in the USA. Taken in Kentucky, with the white man in the foreground being one of Garfield's personal Black Guards he sent out to ensure the slaves were freed
Despite his progressive acts in terms in civil rights, Garfield still maintained his predecessor's opinion in terms of relations with the South. Working with CSA President Longstreet, Garfield would help organize several more treaties of friendship between the two nations, although they were not as sweeping as the ones of Hazen and Gordon. This included expanding free trade with the CSA and most of the rest of the Western Hempshire, in which Garfield was heavily aided by Secretary of State James G. Blaine. Garfield would also work with Secretary of the Navy John A. Logan to help renovate and expand the U.S. Navy as part of the a program he started with the CSA in which they would take the chief role of patrolling the Western Hempshire's oceans.

The USS Galena, one of the new ships create during the Garfield Administration
Despite his immense popularity, some people still disliked Garfield. Most of the hatred Garfield received was due to his support of anti-corruption and anti-patronage laws, which were viewed by many low ranking politicians as the just rewards of the winning president. All of this anger reached a boiling point in 1882. While speaking with Secretaries Blaine and Logan on work to meeting concerning free trade and the navy, a crazed office seeker, Charles Guiteau, would walk up to them a pull out a revolver. Quickly, one of the Black Guards accompanying Garfield would take down Guiteau, and managed to hold him down until the police arrived. Nonetheless, Garfield was still shaken by the experience, and personally stayed and watched until Guiteau was secured by the police and arrested.

Charles J. Guiteau, attempted assassin
Despite having a successful presidency, and being beloved by the general public, Garfield had made a powerful rival during his presidency. Garfield and his anti-patronage, pro-good relations with the CSA wing of the party would find opposition from Roscoe Conkling, who lead the pro-patronage, pro-heightened tensions or war of reconquest against the CSA faction of the Republicans, who believed the only way to clear themselves both in the eyes of the people and future generations was to eliminate the biggest mark of shame on their party. When the Republican National Convention of 1884 came around, it would decide which of the two factions would control the party.

Vice-President Arthur, standing at left, walking into argument between Garfield, seated at right, and New York Senators Thomas C. Platt, seated at left, and Roscoe Conkling, standing at right​

Garfield and his cabinet:
President: James A. Garfield
Vice-President: Chester A. Arthur
Secretary of State: James G. Blaine
Secretary of the Treasury: George F. Edmunds
Secretary of War: Ulysses S. Grant
Attorney General: David Davis
Postmaster General: Henry L. Dawes
Secretary of the Navy: John A. Logan
Secretary of the Interior: John Sherman
Very happy to see a surviving Garfield. I'm a big fan of James Garfield :D Love the update!
 
Chapter Twenty-Nine: The Garfield Presidency

President James Garfield
As soon as Garfield entered office, it immediately became clear that Garfield would be able to function more efficiently than Hazen in the presidency. While Hazen was argumentative and made many rivals, Garfield was able to work well with others, retaining many of Hazen's cabinet members. Garfield would even return to seeming political exile David Davis back into the spotlight with his appointment as Attorney General. Garfield's cabinet would include all three men who had challenged him during the Republican National Convention, and he was able to mold them into an effective board of advisors. One of the first things Garfield did when he entered office was to see to it that the 13th Amendment, which finally outlawed slavery in the United States despite only less then a thousand slaves still were in the country, was passed. The amendment had been started during Hazen's term, but he had stonewalled it both to spite his rivals in Congress and he feared it might enrage the CSA, who he was trying to improve relations with. Garfield also helped in the passing of 14th and 15th Amendments, which gave defined citizenship and ensured voting equality based on race under the law respectively.

An photograph of some of the last slaves left in the USA. Taken in Kentucky, with the white man in the foreground being one of Garfield's personal Black Guards he sent out to ensure the slaves were freed
Despite his progressive acts in terms in civil rights, Garfield still maintained his predecessor's opinion in terms of relations with the South. Working with CSA President Longstreet, Garfield would help organize several more treaties of friendship between the two nations, although they were not as sweeping as the ones of Hazen and Gordon. This included expanding free trade with the CSA and most of the rest of the Western Hempshire, in which Garfield was heavily aided by Secretary of State James G. Blaine. Garfield would also work with Secretary of the Navy John A. Logan to help renovate and expand the U.S. Navy as part of the a program he started with the CSA in which they would take the chief role of patrolling the Western Hempshire's oceans.

The USS Galena, one of the new ships create during the Garfield Administration
Despite his immense popularity, some people still disliked Garfield. Most of the hatred Garfield received was due to his support of anti-corruption and anti-patronage laws, which were viewed by many low ranking politicians as the just rewards of the winning president. All of this anger reached a boiling point in 1882. While speaking with Secretaries Blaine and Logan on work to meeting concerning free trade and the navy, a crazed office seeker, Charles Guiteau, would walk up to them a pull out a revolver. Quickly, one of the Black Guards accompanying Garfield would take down Guiteau, and managed to hold him down until the police arrived. Nonetheless, Garfield was still shaken by the experience, and personally stayed and watched until Guiteau was secured by the police and arrested.

Charles J. Guiteau, attempted assassin
Despite having a successful presidency, and being beloved by the general public, Garfield had made a powerful rival during his presidency. Garfield and his anti-patronage, pro-good relations with the CSA wing of the party would find opposition from Roscoe Conkling, who lead the pro-patronage, pro-heightened tensions or war of reconquest against the CSA faction of the Republicans, who believed the only way to clear themselves both in the eyes of the people and future generations was to eliminate the biggest mark of shame on their party. When the Republican National Convention of 1884 came around, it would decide which of the two factions would control the party.

Vice-President Arthur, standing at left, walking into argument between Garfield, seated at right, and New York Senators Thomas C. Platt, seated at left, and Roscoe Conkling, standing at right​

Garfield and his cabinet:
President: James A. Garfield
Vice-President: Chester A. Arthur
Secretary of State: James G. Blaine
Secretary of the Treasury: George F. Edmunds
Secretary of War: Ulysses S. Grant
Attorney General: David Davis
Postmaster General: Henry L. Dawes
Secretary of the Navy: John A. Logan
Secretary of the Interior: John Sherman
As the villain on this thread dare I add a dose of reality? The North was protectionist, only moderating that policy in a compromise with the South. Having thrown a war to the South, and with protectionism aimed at the pro Confederacy Britain, why would they reverse policy? A free trade zone is beyond 19th Century thinking. Could you address the issue of the Mississippi? All the inland states of the United States are now land locked, crippling long term economic development. Why is the USN needing modernization, it never would've been left to rot as it was in the OTL. Just why are the USN, and CSN patrolling the Western Hemisphere?

Why is all this happy land stuff happening? The USA, and CSA have huge economic conflicts. The disruptions of war are live, and unhealed. The bitterness of a self inflicted defeat would only fester. It took a generation for the South to get over the bitterness of defeat in a hard fought war, and that was after national unity was reestablished. In a war that was thrown, resulting in a national division would be much worse. The bitter recriminations, and charges of treason in the North would resemble post WWI Germany. Calles for a war of reunion would be overwhelming. Peace, and love for the CSA wouldn't be very popular in the United States.
 
Chapter Thirty: The Longstreet Presidency
Chapter Thirty: The Longstreet Presidency

President James Longstreet
Once in office, it immediately became clear that Longstreet was not going to be another Gordon. His cabinet consisted of his friends and close political allies, with several people criticizing that it consisted of 5 representatives and one governor, with not one senator in sight. He also had very different temperament than Gordon. While both Gordon and Longstreet could have been said to have suffered from stubbornness, Longstreet took it to the next level, and often judged political matters based solely on the opinions of himself and his cabinet, and often disregarding the Liberty Party leaders in Congress, like President Pro Tempore Robert M.T. Hunter, House Speaker Zebulon Vance, and the chairs of the three most powerful Senate committees, Finance, Military Affairs, and Foreign Affairs, chaired by Senators James A. Seddon, Albert G. Brown and John H. Reagan respectively. This often created friction between himself and the Liberty Party, and helped to create factions in the party.

Robert M.T. Hunter, Zebulon Vance, James A. Seddon, Albert G. Brown, and John H. Reagan
Longstreet's presidency would also see the rise of the greatest CSA Native American warrior: Geronimo. Spurred by the expansion of CSA settlers on their land, Geromino would lead the Apache in their resistance against the encroaching settlers. He would lead raids against smaller settlements, usually just stealing horses and supplies, but occasionally a few citizens would be killed. Eventually, enough citizens were killed to attract the attention and ire of President Longstreet. Turning to the CSA's iron fist, their cavalry, Longstreet would request that General Forrest send at least a regiment out to stop Geronimo and his Apaches. Forrest would select a man he had experience serving with, General James R. Chalmers, and send him out with his command, the 5th CSA Cavalry, to destroy the threat.

Geronimo and James R. Chalmers
Despite being a veteran of the Civil War and much raiding, Chalmers and the 5th Cavalry would find themselves wholly unprepared for defeating Geronimo. Geronimo would launch small surprise attacks and raids on the 5th Cavalry, whittling down their numbers while hardly costing any men of his own. Eventually, Chalmers decided he was going to need to unencumber himself for a successful campaign, and would leave his pair of Gatling guns and their crews in the small local town of McGowan, Arizona Territory to defend the town while he lead the rest of his cavalry in a pursuit of Geronimo. Eventually, Chalmers would corner Geronimo and his forces near the Gilo River, and he planned to attack them the next day. What he did not realize, however, was that Geronimo's forces actually slightly outnumbered his own, and that Geronimo had merely been forcing Chalmers into a chase that would expend much of his resources. The following morning, Geronimo would lead his forces in a surprise attack of the 5th Cavalry's camp, forcing them to fall back and attempt to form a defense. It would be in vain, however, as Geronimo continued to apply pressure, and soon almost all the 5th Cavalry broke and routed, leaving behind a small rearguard under General Chalmers to try and protect them. This rearguard would not last long, however, with them rapidly being all killed or wounded and captured, with Chalmers among the dead. With the rearguard down, Geronimo continued to harass the retreating 5th Cavalry, now under Colonel Charles C. Crews, killing or capturing dozens more until the reached the relative safety of McGowan, where, with their Gatling guns, they put up a defense. The Battle of Gilo would be the worst defeat the CSA suffered to Native American forces, and Geronimo and his forces would only be forced to surrender when General Forrest himself, along with the 6th Cavalry under General Frank Armstrong, the 7th Cavalry under General John S. Williams, and the remnants of the 5th Cavalry under Colonel Crews, came west and moved against him.

Chalmers' Last Rally by Jacob Mulvany, with Chalmers at center holding revolver and saber
Longstreet's term in office also saw two disturbing things to the Liberty Party, one the result of the other. First was the rise of Republicans favoring a war of CSA reconquest, and though at the present, Garfield and the peace Republicans maintained the Executive Branch, the greater number of Republicans in congress were pro-war. Secondly, as a result of the CSA populace fearing that a second war with the USA might be imminent, the southern Democrats were beginning to regain power and traction in Congress and the public mind. Combining this with the increasing divide in the Liberty Party, and some believed that in the upcoming election, the Democrats might have a chance at gaining the presidency. Many agreed, however, that the success or failure of a Democrat candidate likely depend on whether a pro or anti-war candidate was elected as the next U.S. president.

Longstreet and his cabinet:
President: James Longstreet
Vice-President: Wade Hampton III
Secretary of State: Thomas J. Goree
Secretary of the Treasury: Moxley Sorrel
Secretary of War: Micah Jenkins
Secretary of the Navy: George W.C. Lee
Attorney General: Lucius Q.C. Lamar
Postmaster General: P.G.T. Beauregard
 
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Battles of Little Bighorn and Gilo Tables
Battle of Little Bighorn
Good Marksmanship and Guts by Kevin Rocco

Date: July 25, 1873
Location: Near Little Bighorn River, Montana
Result: Decisive American victory
Belligerents
Lakota
Dakota
Northern Cheyenne
United States

Commanders and leaders
Red Cloud (W.I.A. & C.)
Crazy Horse (K.I.A.)
Sitting Bull
James B. McPherson (W.I.A.)
George Crook
Units Involved
Irregular military
1st-10th United States Infantry
1st
-3rd United States Cavalry
1st
& 2nd United States Artillery
Strength
~2,000 warriors~13,000 soldiers
Casualties and losses
~450
100 killed
250 wounded
100 captured
~100
45 killed
55 wounded


Battle of Gilo
Chalmers' Last Rally by Jacob Mulvany​

Date: August 13, 1881
Location: Near Gilo River, Arizona
Result: Decisive Apache victory
Belligerents
Apache
Confederate States
Commanders and leaders
GeronimoJames R. Chalmers (K.I.A.)
Charles C. Crews
Units Involved
Irregular military5th Confederate States Cavalry
Strength
~900 warriors~800 soldiers
Casualties and losses
~50
15 killed
35 wounded
~600
90 killed
160 wounded
350 captured
 
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Been enjoying the timeline of your's @TheRockofChickamauga. I vote for the "Abandon The Alamo!" timeline. It should be quite interesting, especially on how the Texan Revolution would play out with a different scenario, judging by its namesake.
 
Warning
Battle of Little Bighorn
Good Marksmanship and Guts by Kevin Rocco

Date: July 25, 1873
Location: Near Little Bighorn River, Montana
Result: Decisive American victory
Belligerents
Lakota
Dakota
Northern Cheyenne
United States
Commanders and leaders
Red Cloud (W.I.A. & C.)
Crazy Horse (K.I.A.)
Sitting Bull
James B. McPherson (W.I.A.)
George Crook
Units Involved
Irregular military1st-10th United States Infantry
1st
-3rd United States Cavalry
1st
& 2nd United States Artillery
Strength
~2,000 warriors~13,000 soldiers
Casualties and losses
~450
100 killed
250 wounded
100 captured
~100
45 killed
55 wounded


Battle of Gilo
Chalmers' Last Rally by Jacob Mulvany​

Date: August 13, 1881
Location: Near Gilo River, Arizona
Result: Decisive Apache victory
Belligerents
Apache
Confederate States
Commanders and leaders
GeronimoJames R. Chalmers (K.I.A.)
Charles C. Crews
Units Involved
Irregular military5th Confederate States Cavalry
Strength
~900 warriors~800 soldiers
Casualties and losses
~50
15 killed
35 wounded
~600
90 killed
160 wounded
350 captured
Wow Geronimo did very well. He led an Apache war band many times larger then he ever did in the OTL. He engaged and destroyed a bigger cavalry force then Custer led at Little Big Horn. The CSA 5th Cavalry lost more then twice as many men as Custer did, but then Custer didn't have many men taken prisoner, I believe the number was 0. Just what do Indians do with prisoners? I should be to freighted to ask. 12 to 1 loses, you can't do much better then that, but that's what happens when you get routed. Do Confederate Paratroopers shout "GERONIMO!"?
 
Wow Geronimo did very well. He led an Apache war band many times larger then he ever did in the OTL. He engaged and destroyed a bigger cavalry force then Custer led at Little Big Horn. The CSA 5th Cavalry lost more then twice as many men as Custer did, but then Custer didn't have many men taken prisoner, I believe the number was 0. Just what do Indians do with prisoners? I should be to freighted to ask. 12 to 1 loses, you can't do much better then that, but that's what happens when you get routed. Do Confederate Paratroopers shout "GERONIMO!"?
Could you do us all a favour and just ease up on the sarcasm a little, please? It is starting to grate. I realise you probably mean well, but the way you are putting things is, well, harsh to say the least...

@TheRockofChickamauga, keep up the very entertaining work. I always enjoy this TL, having had a soft spot for the Southern US ever since I read Gone With The Wind for the first time. It is also reminding me of a very happy road trip through Virginia and the Carolinas this summer, which is all to the good...
 
Wow Geronimo did very well. He led an Apache war band many times larger then he ever did in the OTL. He engaged and destroyed a bigger cavalry force then Custer led at Little Big Horn. The CSA 5th Cavalry lost more then twice as many men as Custer did, but then Custer didn't have many men taken prisoner, I believe the number was 0. Just what do Indians do with prisoners? I should be to freighted to ask. 12 to 1 loses, you can't do much better then that, but that's what happens when you get routed. Do Confederate Paratroopers shout "GERONIMO!"?
If you have a critique, make it civilly. Don't pull this passive-aggressive trolling routine.
 
Could you do us all a favour and just ease up on the sarcasm a little, please? It is starting to grate. I realise you probably mean well, but the way you are putting things is, well, harsh to say the least...

@TheRockofChickamauga, keep up the very entertaining work. I always enjoy this TL, having had a soft spot for the Southern US ever since I read Gone With The Wind for the first time. It is also reminding me of a very happy road trip through Virginia and the Carolinas this summer, which is all to the good...
Wow. Lets all engage in happy talk, everything, anyone writes gets a gold star, forget about logic, or reason. Glad you enjoyed your road trip. I used to live in Virginia, have visited North Carolina many times, and was stationed in SC for some of the best years of my life. So was your view of the Confederacy formed by movies like "Gone with the Wind"? Have you seen "Birth of a Nation"? President Wilson loved it.

In your visit did you see any plantations, or restoration sites? Do you think the happy slaves in GWTW are representative of the "Peculiar Institution"? Just what do you think the Confederacy was fighting for? What was the Glorious Cause? "Our rights" What right was that? Could it be the institution of Slavery, which was made permanent in the Confederate Constitution? The CSA wasn't some charming place, of grace, and honor. It's economy was based on the breeding, selling, and exploiting of human beings. It's social structure was based on the racial superiority of the Whiteman over the Blackman. The hierarchy was becoming increasingly autocratic, and anti democratic.

An independent CSA would have been an ugly, repressive nation, dependent on the violent, and brutal repression of almost 40% of it's people. You can have a soft spot for the modern South, but there is nothing to be sentimental about the CSA. It's not worthy of your kind feelings.
 
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