Reds fanfic

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: After 1900' started by E. Burke, Jan 17, 2015.

  1. WotanArgead God of Impalers Kicked

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    I don't say hundred in my country there is no revanchism (many blame for the collapse of the USSR, the US and NATO), but .... we have 15,000 rubles paid to workers, mass retirement, a growing number of suicides, the population is dying out, and corruptness has reached unprecedented proportions . In the penultimate study, I wandered down the corridor where the first-graders were rushing, and every five seconds they swore at the mat. And after all my children will have to be trained in a similar school.
     
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  2. Archangel Battery-powered Bureaucrat

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    Sorry to hear that. :(
     
  3. Mr.E The Man that Time Forgot

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    Happy New Years, everyone! In celebration, a double feature.
    Excerpts from "Art in the First Cultural Revolution", generic art history textbook, c. 2003

    ".... Among the many artists recruited by the Secretariat of Culture was a young illustrator named Norman Percevel Rockwell. A native New Yorker, he had been a promising artist in the Boy Scouts magazine Boy's Life in his teens, before he was recruited for the Navy during World War I[1]. His experiences, like so many others, left him alienated and disillusioned. Still, he had managed to find some work with various magazines, as well as continuing with his beloved illustrations at Boy's Life (particularly the Scouting Magazines' yearly calendar), though his disillusionment only continued as magazines began to make thousands his drawings, whilst he got only the payment for the initial drawing. Inevitably, he slowly began to drift towards a number of artists who had become radicalized by the Worker's Party. He began to contribute some illustrations for recruitment and propaganda posters.With his experiences with Boy's Life, he also made some contributions to the Pioneer magazine. It was also during this time that Soviet influenced social realism also began to penetrate his work, showing various workers in a more realist manner similar to Soviet artists of the time

    By the time of the revolution, he had already built up some goodwill from his illustrations in magazines and for the Party. Now, he was asked to make propaganda to help promote the revolution. His illustrations often depicted workers and farmers going on with their daily activities, or people enjoying leisure activities. He also contributed to the new Pioneer magazine, and the Pioneer calendars, which would become some of his most enduring. His biggest project came however, in 1938, when he was commissioned to draw a series of paintings corresponding to the "Declaration of the Rights of Person, Toiler, Exploited Peoples and Citizen." He would spend years releasing this series (partly delayed by World War II), before he released the final one "Article XIX" in 1947....."

    [1] He had tried to apply OTL for the Navy, but was ultimately rejected, and he instead became a military artist who never saw service. I imagine, with an earlier entry into World War I, they would have a need for more soldiers.
    ------------------------

    El Terror al Acecho (The Lurking Terror)

    A 1958 Mexican science fiction-horror film. Despite being a "riff" (read: rip-off) of The Quatermass Experiment , it is considered an underrated classic of the Golden Age of Mexican Cinema.

    An American space capsule crashes in the Mexican desert in Sonora, after a lunar orbit mission. Only the Mexican crew member, Diego, is, and is forced into a Mexico City hospital. Dr. Ernesto Galvez, a local astronomer, and Diego's wife, Julianna Curbelo, another astronomer who works with Galvez and helped the mission, are sent to retrieve and interview Diego about what caused the crash. However, when Diego awakes from his coma, he lashes out violently, saying that "It's Coming! It's Coming!"

    With Diego sedated and restrained, Galvez goes to the crashed craft, and sees no technical failure. Then, he spots some mold on the side of the craft. He collects it, and returns to his university to have it tested. Julianna attempts to console her husband, and, now that he is calmed down, tries to convince the hospital staff to release him. Galvez learns that the mold does not match any Earth species, and this gets him speculating. He goes to where the other two are autopsied, and learns that the mold was also found on them.

    Diego is finally calm enough to tell Galvez and Julianna what really happened. During the return to Earth, his crew mates began to become more aggressive. While they attributed it to Cabin Fever, they grow more and more deranged. Diego noted that their skin became more flaky, and when he heard them talking, he realized that they were under a strange possession, and were planning to wreck havoc once back on Earth. The crash was orchestrated by Diego to prevent this from happening.

    Galvez notes that Diego seems boiling, implying he is under the mysterious mold control as well. While Julianna tries to convince Galvez otherwise, he demands that Diego be held under complete surveillance. Sure enough, Diego finds the strength to escape, and when Julianna tries to reason with him, he pushes her aside, showing that he is now under the complete control of the mold. He heads to the morgue, where he retrieves the two bodies. (It's implied the mold merges them).

    Galvez and Julianna go to find the monster that Diego has become is rampaging through Mexico City. While the militas try to gun him down, they shrug him off. Luckily, Galvez and Julianna are able to stall the monster enough (appealing to the remaining consciouses of the crew), that the Mexican militas are able to destroy it. The film ends with Galvez comforting a grieving Julianna.
    -------------

    Happy New Year!
     
  4. Mr.E The Man that Time Forgot

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    Inspired a little by one of @The_Red_Star_Rising 's recent batch of parties and an earlier mention of it ( a bit of a retcon, though):

    Franco-British Party for the Advancement of Mankind/
    Parti Franco-Britannique pour l'Avancement de l'Humanité


    Party Leader: Simon Wells
    Founded:2002
    Ideology: Marxist-Transhumanism
    Political position: Ultra-Left (FBU), Far-Left (International
    International Affiliation: Futurist International
    Official Color: Purple
    Youth Wing: Youth for Science, Technology, and Futurism
    Party Newspaper: The Shape of Things to Come/ Le Tour du Monde en Quatre-Vingts Secondes
    Party of Government?: No, aligned with Left Oppositon, two seats
    Animal symbol of the Party: Ant

    Capital Punishment: Strongly opposes capital punishment, and advocates its immediate abolition
    Civil Defense: Replace current civil system with a defense computer system, whose operations are regulated and controlled by the people, and controls robots, drones, etc. to protect them
    Cultural Stance: Advocates transhumanism (in the form of genetic modification and prosthetics) and cultural revolution; advocates the complete upheaval of social and cultural norms (eliminating any trace of any societal differences), as well as rights for sentient creatures besides man; generally supports cultural nationalism, but supports a unified humanity in any event
    Defense: Downsize and supplement it with drones, robots, robotic suits, automated computer systems, etc.
    Drug Policy: Supports the use of genetic modification and neurotherapy to counteract the more devastating effects of drug use, de facto legalization of all drugs
    Economy: Transition to planned, Lange-Lerner-Friedman economy, through the use of a democratically-planned Cybersyn system and computer systems to help with calculation and distribution
    Education: Government run schools, with a strong emphasis on science and technology, as well as the increased use of computers in classrooms
    Environment: Strongly environmentalist, supports the use of technology for helping combat climate change and other environmental issues (mostly through solar or microwave power satellites, research into fusion reactors, and renewable energy sources)
    Foreign Aid: Supports aid to all nations, in an attempt to bring them together in a form of mutual assistance
    Foreign Alliances: Supports the Futurist "World State" Consensus, steadily eliminating borders and alliances, and forming a nation transcending political and economic system
    Immigration: Open Borders
    Law Enforcement: Gradually reduce number of policemen, and replace them with an automated computer system
    Monarchy: Completely dismantle the British Monarchy, as part of the slow dissolution of nations
    Nuclear Armament: Status quo on nuclear arms, disarmament only when the World State is able to disarm
    Social Welfare: Strongly supports it as a means of allowing people the means of gaining augmentations and eventually reaching a post-work, automated economy
    Taxation: Tax computer and robotics industries
    Trade: Use of planned Cybersyn and Computer systems to help regulate and monitor trade.
     
  5. Alexander the Average Anti-lion tamer

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    I unironically support this.

    Can their education policy include mandatory Esperanto classes?
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2018
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  6. WotanArgead God of Impalers Kicked

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    I personally for the creation of a world language based on Sanskrit - it is very reasonably arranged.
     
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  7. Mr.E The Man that Time Forgot

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    9
    I considered including something about Esperanto, since they advocate that as the language for the "World State" (local venaculars are used for the local communities.)
     
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  8. Alexander the Average Anti-lion tamer

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    On that note I wonder what is the status of Esperanto ITTL. It was quite popular in radical socialist circles until Stalin decided that anyone speaking it was clearly a spy IOTL.
     
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  9. Mr.E The Man that Time Forgot

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    I figure, with the UASR taking up the mantle of "socialist experimentation", and without the period of high Stalinism, Esperanto remains very popular in leftist circles, and probably has a major association in the UASR and maybe the USSR.
     
  10. The_Red_Star_Rising Homestuck Trash

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    Stalin's attempts to curtail the growth of Esperanto is only part of why it fizzled out OTL. Hitler hated the language and had it targeted for persecution and annihilation which gutted the movement across Europe. So WW2 is still probably going to hurt for the language, it'll just be able to recover in the future instead of falling and never really picking itself up.
     
  11. WotanArgead God of Impalers Kicked

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    TV Tropes: Boys of Krapivin

    "The name of this trope is prevalent primarily in the Soviet, and partly in the American environment. Arisen thanks to the work of the famous children's writer and one of the leaders of the informal pedagogical movement Vladislav Krapivin. As a rule, boys-protagonists fall into this category. They are characterized by clearly expressed common features: the Krapivin boy is always brave, clear-sighted, knee-high, golenast, vihrast, and endowed with an extremely exacerbated sense of justice, which, as a rule, he protects from right to left. Dressed most often in shorts and a shirt. Shoes do not like, as a last resort manages sandals. Characterizes this type of special relationship of the author - affectionate, bordering on the frank love of their own characters. In the cinema, by the way, the works of director Gus Van Sent are impregnated with the same spirit.

    Where it occurs -

    Vladislav Krapivin's works as a codifier - For example, the cycle "The Great Crystal".

    This type is spread out in Japanese animation.

    The main characters of the story of Ray Bradbury "Wine from Dandelions" fall under this Trope. It is noteworthy that this author is popular in the Soviet Union.

    [​IMG]
    Subversion - Occasionally girls fall into this type."
    *****​

    Guys - I need to consult with one of you, and I would like to do this in correspondence so as not to offend anyone and not to disclose my personal information too much.
     
  12. Aelita In ur means of production...

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    Besides, when it comes to conlangs it's Lojban or bust. Or you're going to go through the trouble of creating an entirely artificial language, it should do something novel that no natural language can. In Lojban (and it's predecessor Loglan), it's a grammar based on predicate logic, meaning that all sentences are syntactically unambiguous.
     
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  13. The_Red_Star_Rising Homestuck Trash

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    My other issue with Esperanto is that for a language that wants to be a world language it is pretty strongly rooted in Indo-European linguistics.
     
  14. Knightmare Well-Known Member

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  15. The_Red_Star_Rising Homestuck Trash

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    He obviously is the one who brings about the end of the FBU and the Cold war as a whole.
     
  16. Mr.E The Man that Time Forgot

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    Pluto Demotion Causes Controversy in Strange, Unexpected Places
    Nature, August 28th, 2006

    What do such disparate places as the New Mexico, Navajo, and Illinois SRs, and Cuba have in common?

    Each passed a resolution this week to protest the International Astronomical Union's demotion of Pluto as a planet. The vote came after the IAU drew up a new definition for a planet. A planet now has to be 1.) In Orbit around the sun, 2.) Rounded by its gravity, and 3.) Cleared out its orbit. Pluto had failed to reach the third definition, and so was demoted to the new status of Dwarf planet. This follows many other discoveries of trans-Neptunian objects and other objects in the so-called "Kuiper Belt", which caused some astronomers to push for the reclassification of Pluto, away from its status as the ninth planet.

    The decision has not sat well with some, who have longed considered Pluto the Ninth Planet in the solar system. In particular, places connected Clyde Tombaugh, the American astronomer who discovered Pluto in 1930, have resented the demotion of the most famous astronomical discovery by their resident. The Illinois Soviet (Tombaugh was born in Illinois in 1906) passed a resolution condemning the IAU, and stating that Pluto would be considered a planet within the state skies (the resolution has no bearing on educational institutes to teach the new IAU definition). Both the New Mexico and Navajo Soviets passed similar resolutions regarding Pluto, in that it will still be considered a planet when in the skies over them, and honor Tombaugh, who had worked in observatories and university in both SRs for most of his career afterwards.

    Most interesting of all, Cuba also passed a resolution, stating that Pluto was a "unique American discovery", and that, while astronomers in the country were to use the IAU's definition for a planet in their research, and schools can update their texts and classes to reflect the new reality, "in the hearts and minds of most Americans, Pluto will always be a planet." Notably, Clyde Tombaugh was also briefly mentioned and honored, despite him staying and working in the mainland after the revolution.

    Both the UASR and Cuba have astronomy associations affiliated with the International Astronomical Union, the American Academy for Astronomy (section of the Academy of Arts and Sciences), and the National Astronomical Institute, respectively, as well as individual members within the union.
     
  17. NintendoFan1998 Well-Known Member

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    ITTL if Shin Megami Tensei is still made, I would assume the law route would be depicted as even more fascist than OTL. (If that's even possible.)
     
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  18. Mr.E The Man that Time Forgot

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    If you're wondering why I'm posting a lot recently, this piece was actually written a couple days ago. It got delayed a bit, and I wrote the other two pieces to make up for it. Anyway, this refers to two pieces by @Bookmark1995 and @Mr. C extensively (here and here, respectively), so special thanks to them (both for writing those two and for looking this one over):

    Mambo Film

    Mambo Film (also known as Cub-sploitation) refers to low budget films (mostly Western, Crime, Horror, or Action) produced or filmed in Cuba. Often, these were produced by B-List Cuban movie studios or subsidiaries of Franco-British film companies, both hoping to make cheap but well-earning features through a loophole in the infamous Cinema Act, which allowed tax breaks for films with "American content", and had a quota for movie theaters, requiring local content. Indeed, these films often contained many Americuban elements to fit this description, and get tax breaks (thus the nickname "Cub-sploitation"). While films fitting the label were produced starting in the 50's, and the labels continued use in the present, the "Golden Age of Mambo Films" is largely considered from the late 60's right up until the repeal of the Cinema Act in 1988. It is considered an underrated, if ultimately beloved part of the "Alliance New Wave" of the 70's, the late 80's, and the 90's.

    Origins

    With big name studios like Warner Bros. and Columbia primarily focused on so-called "Macaco" films or other such lavish productions, Cuban B-Movies were mostly low budget dramas or crime films, often with an element of shock or hysteria to draw in crowds, given their low budget status. These B-Movies were the direct antecedents of the Mambo film. However, the main starting point is considered the enactment of the Cinema Act in 1951. The Cinema Act, forcing movie theaters to fulfill a quota of locally made films in their line-up, was primarily enacted from pressure from the film industry, primarily to help lower costs for production (the allotted subsidies from the Department of Communications only going so far), and to ensure that local content (and films with "American values") was not drowned out by foreign films.

    However, while this benefited the larger studios in their making of "Macaco" war films, it also opened the market up to lesser studios, since any film that had "American values" could get a tax break, lowering costs costs. The first Mambo films were made to take advantage of this and fill the quotas. One of the most notorious of these first Mambo films was The Legend of Johnny Birch, a noted flop and bad movie cult classic about the famed counterrevolutionary. However, the first use of "Mambo" (a reference to its Cuban origin) came from a review of a far better film released in 1956. Produced by Howard Hughes and released through his new purchase RKO, Deliverance was a Western, filmed in Venezuela, and starring 73 year old Tom Mix in the lead role as a sheriff who is forced out of retirement by bandits attacking his town. In contrast of the "Red Westerns" of the UASR, which deconstructed and condemned the myth of the Old West, this was more of a traditional Western, with distinct heroes and villains, though with a surprisingly sympathetic tone towards Native Americans, and a theme of time and development, with a new railroad being built around Mix's town. In their review of the film, the Daily Mirror critic called Deliverance (and other Cuban westerns with a renewed focus on traditional American cowboys and iconography) a "Mambo Western". The term would be picked up as a term for Cuban variations on genres, and eventually, to the specific kind of low-budget film made with a heavy emphasis on Americuban elements or themes that would make it appropriate for the theater quota.

    An unintended side effect was that Franco-British film companies could take advantage of a loophole (that films that were produced by "local companies" and/or had "American values" could be considered quota films), and set subsidiaries up to make films on a low budget and easy distribution in Cuba. These often advertised their Americuban elements openly to ensure that they fit the criteria. Films like The Havana Connection or Yankee Doodle Boy(a biography of George M. Cohan) were made specifically to appeal to both Cuban and British audiences.

    The Golden Age of Mambo Films

    However, the real Golden Age of Mambo films began after MacArthur's death. Several elements contributed to the uptick in exploitation films made during this period. While the Cinema Act remained in place, the censorship of films and the heavy government involvement slowly chipped away, meaning films could explore more taboo topics. The criteria for films that fitted the Cinema Act quota was subsequently expanded in 1966 to include "American and/or Cuban content or values," as well as a new rating system with "A" for films meant exclusively for adults. The fall of Warner Bros-Columbia left a vacuum for content, and a new Cuban middle class desired films that appealed to their sensibilities.

    Hammer Films was one of the major film studios behind many features in the Golden Age, through their Cuban subsidiary, Constitution Pictures [1]. They began to explore the youth market in the late 60's, and to help cement their status, they began to make more lurid horror pictures to appeal to them. One of their biggest films was 1968's Voodoo Witches from Havana, a film which involved three British college girls on vacation in Havana seduced into a cult, very loosely based on Cuban voodoo practices. The success of the film resulted in Hammer filming more such "Cuban" pictures, exploiting the exoticism of the location and would feature both shocking horror and appeals to youth culture (including subtle sexuality). Often, these would involve either "Cuban Voodoo", zombies, or using a Spanish colonial mansion as a haunted location. Other Constitution successes from the early 70's included The Night Men and The Lizards

    Other studios also conspicuously used Cuban settings and/or American themes or imagery for Cuban tax breaks. Eon Productions set up "American Eon" solely to be able to film Caribbean scenes in Cuba for James Bond films. (Indeed, Dr. No and Man with the Golden Gun were both technically Eon-American Eon "co-productions").1970's Havana Nights saw Roger Moore as a British detective investigating a Mafia-related death in London, ultimately bringing him to Havana and teaming up with a Cuban policeman. Other sub-genres which became popular to film in Cuba included "Women in Prison" films (some co-produced by notorious producer Manuel Trujillo*, sometimes called "Cuba's Roger Corman" ) and so-called "Macaco-sploitation", which mocked and denegrated the historical epics produced by Warner-Columbia.

    On the flip side, with the new Cuban audience, many local pictures turned toward contemporary society and issues facing native Cubans. Many famed Cuban filmmakers got their start producing content for Trujillo, primarily geared towards a middle class, native Cuban audience. As opposed to his more controversial pictures for foreign audience, Trujillo actually encouraged a more conservative stance with his native Cuban films. Still, they contained an element of populism. The famed Billy Sanchez (1971-1984) series saw the titular vigilante fighting various criminal elements threatening the native Cuban populace, from corrupt or racist businessmen to Mafia fronts. The Party was a satire where a shoe salesman is mistaken for an important figure, and soon finds himself President of the nation. Many of these would be fondly remembered, and would even become influential for filmmakers in the Cuban exile community in the UASR. Infamously, 1979's Exiles was an exploration of a native man haunted by the memory of his torture in a Cuban prison.

    Fall and Legacy

    While the end of the Cinema Act is considered the end of the Golden Age of Mambo Films by some film historians, other contend that other factors also contributed to its decline. For one, home video options like Laserdisc would slowly kill the "grindhouses", where these films were shown. Another was the closure of many studios during the mid-80's depression across the capitalist sphere. Many Franco-British studios would close their Cuban subsidiaries, and many native studios that had produced these films would also shut down. India and Brazil were also becoming the new key exotic locations, with more favorable climates and local film industries to partner with.

    However, the local backlash was the biggest contributor to their fall. From almost the beginning, conservatives had targeted the more controversial Mambo films as a sign of a outdated system. However, this backlash would come to incorporate liberals and members of the native community, who felt that these sorts of Mambo films were placing a bad image onto their country. Similarly, during the early 80's, Cuban films came under fire in the FBU during the "Video Nasties" scare for their overt sexuality and violence, with Mary Whitehouse citing it, the UASR, and Brazil as the leading locations for the production of "filth coming to our shores."

    The Cinema Act was finally repealed in whole in 1988, along with other "native quota" laws, replaced with a more updated system. While local talent was still encouraged, tax breaks would only be given to projects of "artistic or cultural merit" The loophole was also closed, with only Cuban owned and operated studios allowed these tax breaks. It also lowered the quota necessary, limiting the sheer number of films produced.

    The Golden Age is seen by most film historians as a mixed bag. While it allowed the production of a high number of trashy or simply bad films, it also encouraged a large level of creativity and gave a lot of Cuban filmmakers their start. The label "Mambo film", has been applied to numerous films after 1988, including Juan of the Dead. The era has also been homaged and parodied, from Sanderson Perez's Billy Sanchez homage, El Luchador Cubano, to Edgar Wright's fake trailer homaging the Constitution horror films, The Zapata Swamp Zombies. Mark Hartley's Cuban Party Slaughter: the Story of Mambo Films was a documentary exploring the era and its legacy.

    [1] To disguise their nature from general audiences, most companies owned by Franco-British companies used patriotic names
     
  19. NintendoFan1998 Well-Known Member

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    Nov 3, 2017
    I wonder what the lyrics to We Didn't The Fire would be ITTL. I would write some but I have no musical talent and haven't read (no pun intended) Jello's TL up to the most recent update.
     
  20. Alexander the Average Anti-lion tamer

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    I tried doing my own version for a different timeline idea I had. It is very hard to do.