List of monarchs III

What if Queen Anne had less terrible luck in childbirth?

Kings and Queens of Great Britain
1707-1714: Anne (House of Stuart)
1714-1738: James VIII & III (House of Oldenburg) [1]
1738-1777: George I "The British Lion" (House of Oldenburg) [2]
1777-1808: George II "The Benevolent Bureaucrat" (House of Oldenburg) [2]


Prins_Christian.jpg

James VIII & III as a young boy

[1]
James was born in 1687 as the eldest son of Princess Anne of England and her husband Prince George, Duke of Gloucester. Because his uncle William III and Aunt Mary II didn't have any children, Prince James was third in line to succeed them after his mother. Following the deaths of Mary in 1694 and William in 1702, Prince James' mother Anne became Queen. In 1707, England and Scotland united into Great Britain via the Act of Union and so James became heir of the United Kingdom.

James became king after the death of his mother in 1714. He worked closely with Parliament and the Prime Minsters who formed governments, which helped to consolidate the new political order that formed after the Glorious Revolution.

An issue James had to deal with throughout his reign were the Jacobites, who wanted to install his Catholic cousin James Francis Edward Stuart on the British throne. They were particularly active in the Scottish Highlands, with clans in the region proclaiming their loyalty to the Old Pretender. This isn't to say that the British royal family was against Catholicism altogether, as James' sister Elizabeth remarried to Joao V of Portugal in 1714 following the death of her first husband Friedrich I of Prussia.

In his personal life, James married Sophia Dorothea of Hanover in 1706, with it resulting in the birth of many children. The King would die in 1738 at the age of 61, with his son, George succeeding him as the new monarch.

[2] Born shortly after the death of his grandfather, George of Denmark and Norway, his grandmother Queen Anne had him baptised George Edward Frederick William, in honour of her deceased husband and his Danish relations. Considered the first prince of the "Hampton Generation" - which included the likes of his younger brothers, and his cousins born from his British uncles - George of Cumberland and Frederick of Clarence. Tall from a young age and considered by his tutors to be "too bright for the games of childhood", the Prince of Wales grew into a famous personage - his height, an absurd 1.94 meters, half a giant by the standards of those times and his quick wit made him famous throughout Europe.

George would become King in 1738, at the age of 20, immediatelly causing trouble with parliament. While parliament had been allowed to flourish under the reign of his father, George was instead eager to recover the prerogatives that his grandmother Anne and her brother-in-law, William of Orange, had. Often applying his power of veto and dismembering a plot to have him killed and place one of his younger brothers on the throne, the people of London would revolt against Parliament once news filtered from the palace that the King had "almost been killed" by Whig partisans. Contrary to parliamentary rethoric, George did not install absolute rule but instead issued a charter - combining the ideology of the Stuarts with the teachings and passings of the Glorious Revolution into one - The King's Charter. The role of the Prime Minister was set down, a branching of political power in the person of the King, the two houses of Parliament and the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. While the royals would obtain many powers from George's role in the subversion of Parliamentary supremacy, George would nonetheless rule with Parliament for his whole reign, never over it, contributting to the political balance of the realm.

330px-Portrait_of_Fran%C3%A7ois_Marie_de_Broglie%2C_Duke_of_Broglie%2C_Marshal_of_France_%28member_of_the_circle_of_Hyacinthe_Rigaud%29.jpg

George would marry in 1742 to Princess Friederike Luise of Prussia, beginning what European historians called the "Diplomatic Revolution". After the death of Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire, his son (his only son from a brood with five daughters) Joseph the II, fearing the growing ambition of powers like Saxony, Prussia and Bavaria decided to abandon his traditional rivalry with France, inheriting the legacy of defeat of war in the Low Countries and the loss of the Austrian Netherlands to France. Realigning with France and Russia, abandoning the alliance with Great Britain, this left much of the smaller continental European powers guideless. George would - through family ties and alliances of occasion - form detente with various European powers to beat off this alliance - The Kingdom of Prussia, home to the Queen, was the first to join George, with Sweden - ruled by Gustav III Vilhelm, the son of William of Gloucester, James VIII's younger brother and Ulrika Eleanora, Queen of Sweden. As Austria and France made ouvertures to Spain following George's diplomatic manouveurs, it backfired, as the Netherlands - where the Orangist Statholders had managed to keep a great degree of power following William of Orange's death and Portugal, threatened by Spain both in Europe and in Southern Brazil and ruled by George's cousin, Henry the II. This close alliance of minor powers under Britain's lead - The Netherlands, Sweden, Prussia and Portugal would rise up to challenge the continental hegemony as war broke out in 1749 in Canada between British and French colonial forces, a casus bellii that started what was called the "Eleven years war", with Britain and it's allies coming out victorious.

While countries such as the Netherlands and Prussia looked, at the time, as the most profitable winners of the war - as France and the Netherlands came to an accord to divide the lower Netherlands, Flanders going to the Dutch Republic while Prussia cemented it's control over Pomerania, gained Hamburg and Silesia, Britain came out of the war with a growing influence over the continent and supremacy in colonial affairs - having gained Louisiana and Canada from the French and becoming the dominant power in India.

George and his wife would have four children, beginning the "British Imperial Era", also known as the Georgian age. He was succeeded by his son, George, Prince of Wales.

[3] George Frederick Christian Augustus was born in November 1744, to King George I and Queen Frederica, as the second child, but eldest son. He would receive tutoring from Martin Folkes, with whom, many believe gave, George, his future views.

Although George was 0.05 meters smaller than his father, he was still seen as a large figure in British politics, for when he came of age, George would use his residence to became a frequent meeting place of different individuals, writers, scientists, inventors and statesmen discussing new ideas regarding culture, technology, and diplomacy.

George would also take up his seat in the House of Lords, through this office, he would support and become patron of many new members of the house of common, for example, he would support a colonial agent from Pennsylvania, Dr. Benjamin Franklin to represent a new political party, that would rival both the Tories and the Whigs, the Democratic Party.
This party would push the Whigs from opposition to obscurity and once George himself came to the throne, they would become the ruling party for a majority of his reign.

In 1763, George married Princess Caroline of Hesse-Darmstadt (1746–1821), the eldest daughter of Louis IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt and his wife Countess Palatine Caroline of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld. This marriage was contracted for diplomatic and political reasons, with Great Britain wanting to have closer ties with the the Protestant states within the Holy Roman Empire, and it was his mother, Frederica of Prussia, arranging with her family, a German wife.

Caroline’s brother, would become Prince Louis X (1753–1830), later Grand Duke Louis I, while her sisters went on to have royal matches; Princess Frederica (1751–1805), married King Friedrich Wilhelm II of Prussia; Princess Amalie (1754–1832), married her first cousin Karl Ludwig, Grand Duke of Baden; Princess Wilhelmina (1755–1776), married Emperor Petrovich of Russia, and Princess Luise (1757–1830), married Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.

The marriage was able to produce many healthy children but also developed into a loving personal relationship, which spanned 44 years.

His nickname would come from his generosity with political reforms showing that devolution didn’t have to mean diminishing his authority, but instead allowed his laws to be passed across the empire, from the American Dominion Assembly in Philadelphia to the Bombay Governors office, with support of local officials as well as keeping the vast colonies running efficiency.

Queen Caroline awoke to find George dead next to her in bed, having slipped away peaceful in his sleep, following a short illness, she would alert the guards, who informed his successor, _____________, as well as the prime minister to address parliament.
 
It was six hours, it's in the rules on the first page, so @TheBeanieBaron was right.

Plantagenet claimed at 5.40, valid to 11.40

Last post was at 9.50 on Sunday so would have timed out at 9.50 on Wednesday.

1. Each poster get's one entry per list and must wait for at least one post by someone else before adding another entry. If a poster wishes to make an entry but is unable to do so immediately, they may stake a claim to their post - this is only valid for six hours, at which point, if they have not posted, someome else may stake a claim. Only one claim may be in play on each list at any given time.
 
What if Queen Anne had less terrible luck in childbirth?

Kings and Queens of Great Britain
1707-1714: Anne (House of Stuart)
1714-1738: James VIII & III (House of Oldenburg) [1]
1738-1777: George I “The British Lion” (House of Oldenburg) [2]
1777-1808: George II "The Benevolent Bureaucrat” (House of Oldenburg) [3]
1808-1819: George III (House of Oldenburg) [4]


Prins_Christian.jpg

James VIII & III as a young boy

[1]
James was born in 1687 as the eldest son of Princess Anne of England and her husband Prince George, Duke of Gloucester. Because his uncle William III and Aunt Mary II didn't have any children, Prince James was third in line to succeed them after his mother. Following the deaths of Mary in 1694 and William in 1702, Prince James' mother Anne became Queen. In 1707, England and Scotland united into Great Britain via the Act of Union and so James became heir of the United Kingdom.

James became king after the death of his mother in 1714. He worked closely with Parliament and the Prime Minsters who formed governments, which helped to consolidate the new political order that formed after the Glorious Revolution.

An issue James had to deal with throughout his reign were the Jacobites, who wanted to install his Catholic cousin James Francis Edward Stuart on the British throne. They were particularly active in the Scottish Highlands, with clans in the region proclaiming their loyalty to the Old Pretender. This isn't to say that the British royal family was against Catholicism altogether, as James' sister Elizabeth remarried to Joao V of Portugal in 1714 following the death of her first husband Friedrich I of Prussia.

In his personal life, James married Sophia Dorothea of Hanover in 1706, with it resulting in the birth of many children. The King would die in 1738 at the age of 61, with his son, George succeeding him as the new monarch.

[2] Born shortly after the death of his grandfather, George of Denmark and Norway, his grandmother Queen Anne had him baptised George Edward Frederick William, in honour of her deceased husband and his Danish relations. Considered the first prince of the "Hampton Generation" - which included the likes of his younger brothers, and his cousins born from his British uncles - George of Cumberland and Frederick of Clarence. Tall from a young age and considered by his tutors to be "too bright for the games of childhood", the Prince of Wales grew into a famous personage - his height, an absurd 1.94 meters, half a giant by the standards of those times and his quick wit made him famous throughout Europe.

George would become King in 1738, at the age of 20, immediatelly causing trouble with parliament. While parliament had been allowed to flourish under the reign of his father, George was instead eager to recover the prerogatives that his grandmother Anne and her brother-in-law, William of Orange, had. Often applying his power of veto and dismembering a plot to have him killed and place one of his younger brothers on the throne, the people of London would revolt against Parliament once news filtered from the palace that the King had "almost been killed" by Whig partisans. Contrary to parliamentary rethoric, George did not install absolute rule but instead issued a charter - combining the ideology of the Stuarts with the teachings and passings of the Glorious Revolution into one - The King's Charter. The role of the Prime Minister was set down, a branching of political power in the person of the King, the two houses of Parliament and the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. While the royals would obtain many powers from George's role in the subversion of Parliamentary supremacy, George would nonetheless rule with Parliament for his whole reign, never over it, contributting to the political balance of the realm.

330px-Portrait_of_Fran%C3%A7ois_Marie_de_Broglie%2C_Duke_of_Broglie%2C_Marshal_of_France_%28member_of_the_circle_of_Hyacinthe_Rigaud%29.jpg

George would marry in 1742 to Princess Friederike Luise of Prussia, beginning what European historians called the "Diplomatic Revolution". After the death of Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire, his son (his only son from a brood with five daughters) Joseph the II, fearing the growing ambition of powers like Saxony, Prussia and Bavaria decided to abandon his traditional rivalry with France, inheriting the legacy of defeat of war in the Low Countries and the loss of the Austrian Netherlands to France. Realigning with France and Russia, abandoning the alliance with Great Britain, this left much of the smaller continental European powers guideless. George would - through family ties and alliances of occasion - form detente with various European powers to beat off this alliance - The Kingdom of Prussia, home to the Queen, was the first to join George, with Sweden - ruled by Gustav III Vilhelm, the son of William of Gloucester, James VIII's younger brother and Ulrika Eleanora, Queen of Sweden. As Austria and France made ouvertures to Spain following George's diplomatic manouveurs, it backfired, as the Netherlands - where the Orangist Statholders had managed to keep a great degree of power following William of Orange's death and Portugal, threatened by Spain both in Europe and in Southern Brazil and ruled by George's cousin, Henry the II. This close alliance of minor powers under Britain's lead - The Netherlands, Sweden, Prussia and Portugal would rise up to challenge the continental hegemony as war broke out in 1749 in Canada between British and French colonial forces, a casus bellii that started what was called the "Eleven years war", with Britain and it's allies coming out victorious.

While countries such as the Netherlands and Prussia looked, at the time, as the most profitable winners of the war - as France and the Netherlands came to an accord to divide the lower Netherlands, Flanders going to the Dutch Republic while Prussia cemented it's control over Pomerania, gained Hamburg and Silesia, Britain came out of the war with a growing influence over the continent and supremacy in colonial affairs - having gained Louisiana and Canada from the French and becoming the dominant power in India.

George and his wife would have four children, beginning the "British Imperial Era", also known as the Georgian age. He was succeeded by his son, George, Prince of Wales.

[3] George Frederick Christian Augustus was born in November 1744, to King George I and Queen Frederica, as the second child, but eldest son. He would receive tutoring from Martin Folkes, with whom, many believe gave, George, his future views.

Although George was 0.05 meters smaller than his father, he was still seen as a large figure in British politics, for when he came of age, George would use his residence to became a frequent meeting place of different individuals, writers, scientists, inventors and statesmen discussing new ideas regarding culture, technology, and diplomacy.

George would also take up his seat in the House of Lords, through this office, he would support and become patron of many new members of the house of common, for example, he would support a colonial agent from Pennsylvania, Dr. Benjamin Franklin to represent a new political party, that would rival both the Tories and the Whigs, the Democratic Party.
This party would push the Whigs from opposition to obscurity and once George himself came to the throne, they would become the ruling party for a majority of his reign.

In 1763, George married Princess Caroline of Hesse-Darmstadt (1746–1821), the eldest daughter of Louis IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt and his wife Countess Palatine Caroline of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld. This marriage was contracted for diplomatic and political reasons, with Great Britain wanting to have closer ties with the the Protestant states within the Holy Roman Empire, and it was his mother, Frederica of Prussia, arranging with her family, a German wife.

Caroline’s brother, would become Landgrave Louis X (1753–1830), later Grand Duke Louis I, while her sisters went on to have royal matches; Princess Frederica (1751–1805), married King Friedrich Wilhelm II of Prussia; Princess Amalie (1754–1832), married her first cousin Karl Ludwig, Grand Duke of Baden; Princess Wilhelmina (1755–1776), married Emperor Petrovich of Russia, and Princess Luise (1757–1830), married Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.

The marriage was able to produce many healthy children but also developed into a loving personal relationship, which spanned 44 years.

His nickname would come from his generosity with political reforms showing that devolution didn’t have to mean diminishing his authority, but instead allowed his laws to be passed across the empire, from the American Dominion Assembly in Philadelphia to the Bombay Governors office, with support of local officials as well as keeping the vast colonies running efficiency.

Queen Caroline awoke to find George dead next to her in bed, having slipped away peaceful in his sleep, following a short illness, she would alert the guards, who informed his successor, George III, as well as the prime minister to address parliament.

[4] Born in 1768 as the eldest surviving child of King George II and Queen Caroline, George grew up to become a vain prince who loved partying, drinking, and women. His terrible temper caused many people to detest the idea of having him be their future king, with Jacobitism and even Republicanism rising in popularity during the final years of George II’s reign. But tradition was strong and George succeeded his father as King of Great Britain.

The biggest event that occurred during George’s reign was the Spanish Revolution, which saw the country's monarchy get overthrown and replaced by a radical republic that wanted to spread their influence across Europe. Worried by what Spain could do to them, Europe's great powers came together to form a coalition to defeat the republic and restore the Wittelsbachs, who had escaped the revolutionaries clutches and were ruling from their American colonies in exile. Great Britain was part of the coalition and although they were successful in containing Republicanism to Iberia, Spain was able to invade Portugal and establish a sister republic there.

Another problem George had to deal with was James Henry Stuart, the current Jacobite pretender at the time. Known to his supporters as James IX & IV, the prince served in the French army and was a close friend of Charles X of France. He was also popular among the British populace due to his support of Irish sovereignty. This made George worried that the Jacobites would try to overthrow him, though no attempts were made.

George married in 1801 to Duchess Luise of Württemberg, though it didn’t result in any children due to the couple’s total disinterest in each other. In fact, Luise was reportedly glad to hear the news of her husband’s death from heath issues in 1819 just as the two were about to divorce. Thus George’s _____, _____ would succeed him on the throne.
 
What if Queen Anne had less terrible luck in childbirth?

Kings and Queens of Great Britain
1707-1714: Anne (House of Stuart)
1714-1738: James VIII & III (House of Oldenburg) [1]
1738-1777: George I “The British Lion” (House of Oldenburg) [2]
1777-1808: George II "The Benevolent Bureaucrat” (House of Oldenburg) [3]
1808-1819: George III (House of Oldenburg) [4]
1819-1825: Charles III (House of Oldenburg) [5]


Prins_Christian.jpg

James VIII & III as a young boy

[1]
James was born in 1687 as the eldest son of Princess Anne of England and her husband Prince George, Duke of Gloucester. Because his uncle William III and Aunt Mary II didn't have any children, Prince James was third in line to succeed them after his mother. Following the deaths of Mary in 1694 and William in 1702, Prince James' mother Anne became Queen. In 1707, England and Scotland united into Great Britain via the Act of Union and so James became heir of the United Kingdom.

James became king after the death of his mother in 1714. He worked closely with Parliament and the Prime Minsters who formed governments, which helped to consolidate the new political order that formed after the Glorious Revolution.

An issue James had to deal with throughout his reign were the Jacobites, who wanted to install his Catholic cousin James Francis Edward Stuart on the British throne. They were particularly active in the Scottish Highlands, with clans in the region proclaiming their loyalty to the Old Pretender. This isn't to say that the British royal family was against Catholicism altogether, as James' sister Elizabeth remarried to Joao V of Portugal in 1714 following the death of her first husband Friedrich I of Prussia.

In his personal life, James married Sophia Dorothea of Hanover in 1706, with it resulting in the birth of many children. The King would die in 1738 at the age of 61, with his son, George succeeding him as the new monarch.

[2] Born shortly after the death of his grandfather, George of Denmark and Norway, his grandmother Queen Anne had him baptised George Edward Frederick William, in honour of her deceased husband and his Danish relations. Considered the first prince of the "Hampton Generation" - which included the likes of his younger brothers, and his cousins born from his British uncles - George of Cumberland and Frederick of Clarence. Tall from a young age and considered by his tutors to be "too bright for the games of childhood", the Prince of Wales grew into a famous personage - his height, an absurd 1.94 meters, half a giant by the standards of those times and his quick wit made him famous throughout Europe.

George would become King in 1738, at the age of 20, immediatelly causing trouble with parliament. While parliament had been allowed to flourish under the reign of his father, George was instead eager to recover the prerogatives that his grandmother Anne and her brother-in-law, William of Orange, had. Often applying his power of veto and dismembering a plot to have him killed and place one of his younger brothers on the throne, the people of London would revolt against Parliament once news filtered from the palace that the King had "almost been killed" by Whig partisans. Contrary to parliamentary rethoric, George did not install absolute rule but instead issued a charter - combining the ideology of the Stuarts with the teachings and passings of the Glorious Revolution into one - The King's Charter. The role of the Prime Minister was set down, a branching of political power in the person of the King, the two houses of Parliament and the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. While the royals would obtain many powers from George's role in the subversion of Parliamentary supremacy, George would nonetheless rule with Parliament for his whole reign, never over it, contributting to the political balance of the realm.

330px-Portrait_of_Fran%C3%A7ois_Marie_de_Broglie%2C_Duke_of_Broglie%2C_Marshal_of_France_%28member_of_the_circle_of_Hyacinthe_Rigaud%29.jpg

George would marry in 1742 to Princess Friederike Luise of Prussia, beginning what European historians called the "Diplomatic Revolution". After the death of Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire, his son (his only son from a brood with five daughters) Joseph the II, fearing the growing ambition of powers like Saxony, Prussia and Bavaria decided to abandon his traditional rivalry with France, inheriting the legacy of defeat of war in the Low Countries and the loss of the Austrian Netherlands to France. Realigning with France and Russia, abandoning the alliance with Great Britain, this left much of the smaller continental European powers guideless. George would - through family ties and alliances of occasion - form detente with various European powers to beat off this alliance - The Kingdom of Prussia, home to the Queen, was the first to join George, with Sweden - ruled by Gustav III Vilhelm, the son of William of Gloucester, James VIII's younger brother and Ulrika Eleanora, Queen of Sweden. As Austria and France made ouvertures to Spain following George's diplomatic manouveurs, it backfired, as the Netherlands - where the Orangist Statholders had managed to keep a great degree of power following William of Orange's death and Portugal, threatened by Spain both in Europe and in Southern Brazil and ruled by George's cousin, Henry the II. This close alliance of minor powers under Britain's lead - The Netherlands, Sweden, Prussia and Portugal would rise up to challenge the continental hegemony as war broke out in 1749 in Canada between British and French colonial forces, a casus bellii that started what was called the "Eleven years war", with Britain and it's allies coming out victorious.

While countries such as the Netherlands and Prussia looked, at the time, as the most profitable winners of the war - as France and the Netherlands came to an accord to divide the lower Netherlands, Flanders going to the Dutch Republic while Prussia cemented it's control over Pomerania, gained Hamburg and Silesia, Britain came out of the war with a growing influence over the continent and supremacy in colonial affairs - having gained Louisiana and Canada from the French and becoming the dominant power in India.

George and his wife would have four children, beginning the "British Imperial Era", also known as the Georgian age. He was succeeded by his son, George, Prince of Wales.

[3] George Frederick Christian Augustus was born in November 1744, to King George I and Queen Frederica, as the second child, but eldest son. He would receive tutoring from Martin Folkes, with whom, many believe gave, George, his future views.

Although George was 0.05 meters smaller than his father, he was still seen as a large figure in British politics, for when he came of age, George would use his residence to became a frequent meeting place of different individuals, writers, scientists, inventors and statesmen discussing new ideas regarding culture, technology, and diplomacy.

George would also take up his seat in the House of Lords, through this office, he would support and become patron of many new members of the house of common, for example, he would support a colonial agent from Pennsylvania, Dr. Benjamin Franklin to represent a new political party, that would rival both the Tories and the Whigs, the Democratic Party.
This party would push the Whigs from opposition to obscurity and once George himself came to the throne, they would become the ruling party for a majority of his reign.

In 1763, George married Princess Caroline of Hesse-Darmstadt (1746–1821), the eldest daughter of Louis IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt and his wife Countess Palatine Caroline of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld. This marriage was contracted for diplomatic and political reasons, with Great Britain wanting to have closer ties with the the Protestant states within the Holy Roman Empire, and it was his mother, Frederica of Prussia, arranging with her family, a German wife.

Caroline’s brother, would become Landgrave Louis X (1753–1830), later Grand Duke Louis I, while her sisters went on to have royal matches; Princess Frederica (1751–1805), married King Friedrich Wilhelm II of Prussia; Princess Amalie (1754–1832), married her first cousin Karl Ludwig, Grand Duke of Baden; Princess Wilhelmina (1755–1776), married Emperor Petrovich of Russia, and Princess Luise (1757–1830), married Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.

The marriage was able to produce many healthy children but also developed into a loving personal relationship, which spanned 44 years.

His nickname would come from his generosity with political reforms showing that devolution didn’t have to mean diminishing his authority, but instead allowed his laws to be passed across the empire, from the American Dominion Assembly in Philadelphia to the Bombay Governors office, with support of local officials as well as keeping the vast colonies running efficiency.

Queen Caroline awoke to find George dead next to her in bed, having slipped away peaceful in his sleep, following a short illness, she would alert the guards, who informed his successor, George III, as well as the prime minister to address parliament.

[4] Born in 1768 as the eldest surviving child of King George II and Queen Caroline, George grew up to become a vain prince who loved partying, drinking, and women. His terrible temper caused many people to detest the idea of having him be their future king, with Jacobitism and even Republicanism rising in popularity during the final years of George II’s reign. But tradition was strong and George succeeded his father as King of Great Britain.

The biggest event that occurred during George’s reign was the Spanish Revolution, which saw the country's monarchy get overthrown and replaced by a radical republic that wanted to spread their influence across Europe. Worried by what Spain could do to them, Europe's great powers came together to form a coalition to defeat the republic and restore the Wittelsbachs, who had escaped the revolutionaries clutches and were ruling from their American colonies in exile. Great Britain was part of the coalition and although they were successful in containing Republicanism to Iberia, Spain was able to invade Portugal and establish a sister republic there.

Another problem George had to deal with was James Henry Stuart, the current Jacobite pretender at the time. Known to his supporters as James IX & IV, the prince served in the French army and was a close friend of Charles X of France. He was also popular among the British populace due to his support of Irish sovereignty. This made George worried that the Jacobites would try to overthrow him, though no attempts were made.

George married in 1801 to Duchess Luise of Württemberg, though it didn’t result in any children due to the couple’s total disinterest in each other. In fact, Luise was reportedly glad to hear the news of her husband’s death from heath issues in 1819 just as the two were about to divorce. Thus George’s brother, Frederick, Duke of Kendal and Kent, would succeed him on the throne.

[5] Charles Augustus Frederick George was the seventh child and four son of King George II and Caroline, born in 1781. His birth had been complicated and resulted in permanent withering of his left leg, caused by damage done to the nerves in his leg.
From an early age his disability put him at a disadvantage, not being able receive a military training like his other brothers, instead he had to rely upon his ability of wit and knowledge.

He briefly considered becoming a cleric in the Church of England, having taken tutorage from numerous bishops during his educational years, however tragedy struck the family, when the third brother, Edward, Duke of Gloucester and Ross, born 1774, whom had yet to marry, had served in the Royal Navy and sadly was lost at sea, when their ship was sunk battling a pirate fleet, in 1795, while the second brother, William, Duke of York and Edinburgh, born 1769, died from consumption in 1801, without issue with his wife, Sophia of Prussia.

This placed the fourth son to the position of third in line and then on the passing of his father, at the age of 27, Charles became heir presumptive to his brother.

During his brother’s 11 year reign, Charles would spend time sitting in for him, during parliamentary meetings, seeing contempt in the eyes of the public officers; if it wasn’t the drunk, womanising, party animal, leading them, it was the crippled and uncharismatic spare, with Charles being compared to the disfigured Elizabeth statesman, Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury.

This did not hinder is ability to debate politics and he still became a sort after bachelor, with brides from all of Europe seeking an audience. With in a year, in 1809, Charles would propose to his cousin, Princess Caroline Louise of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, daughter of Charles Augustus, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Charles’s aunt, Princess Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt.
The match was seen as a perfect one, the pair having written to each other from a young age, as well as Caroline being a kind soul, forging a loving and caring relationship with her husband. They would only produce two children but were happy with their small family.

When he succeeded his brother, many expected him to chose an alternative name, but Charles persisted that his parents and everyone he knew by his Christian name and didn’t care that the young Jacobite pretender, had used it, Charles Oldenburg was the rightful king and would use his name with pride.

His own reign would be remembered for securing trade with the monarchies of Europe, Asia and Wittelsbach’s monarchy in the Americas while isolating the Iberian Peninsula. As well as restoring trust in the monarchy.
Sadly his reign came to an abrupt end when he suffered a stroke at the age of 44, in 1825, being succeeded by, ______.
 
What if Queen Anne had less terrible luck in childbirth?

Kings and Queens of Great Britain
1707-1714: Anne (House of Stuart)
1714-1738: James VIII & III (House of Oldenburg) [1]
1738-1777: George I “The British Lion” (House of Oldenburg) [2]
1777-1808: George II "The Benevolent Bureaucrat” (House of Oldenburg) [3]
1808-1819: George III (House of Oldenburg) [4]
1819-1825: Charles III (House of Oldenburg) [5]
1825-1854: William IV "The Colonial" (House of Oldenburg) [6]


Prins_Christian.jpg

James VIII & III as a young boy

[1]
James was born in 1687 as the eldest son of Princess Anne of England and her husband Prince George, Duke of Gloucester. Because his uncle William III and Aunt Mary II didn't have any children, Prince James was third in line to succeed them after his mother. Following the deaths of Mary in 1694 and William in 1702, Prince James' mother Anne became Queen. In 1707, England and Scotland united into Great Britain via the Act of Union and so James became heir of the United Kingdom.

James became king after the death of his mother in 1714. He worked closely with Parliament and the Prime Minsters who formed governments, which helped to consolidate the new political order that formed after the Glorious Revolution.

An issue James had to deal with throughout his reign were the Jacobites, who wanted to install his Catholic cousin James Francis Edward Stuart on the British throne. They were particularly active in the Scottish Highlands, with clans in the region proclaiming their loyalty to the Old Pretender. This isn't to say that the British royal family was against Catholicism altogether, as James' sister Elizabeth remarried to Joao V of Portugal in 1714 following the death of her first husband Friedrich I of Prussia.

In his personal life, James married Sophia Dorothea of Hanover in 1706, with it resulting in the birth of many children. The King would die in 1738 at the age of 61, with his son, George succeeding him as the new monarch.

[2] Born shortly after the death of his grandfather, George of Denmark and Norway, his grandmother Queen Anne had him baptised George Edward Frederick William, in honour of her deceased husband and his Danish relations. Considered the first prince of the "Hampton Generation" - which included the likes of his younger brothers, and his cousins born from his British uncles - George of Cumberland and Frederick of Clarence. Tall from a young age and considered by his tutors to be "too bright for the games of childhood", the Prince of Wales grew into a famous personage - his height, an absurd 1.94 meters, half a giant by the standards of those times and his quick wit made him famous throughout Europe.

George would become King in 1738, at the age of 20, immediatelly causing trouble with parliament. While parliament had been allowed to flourish under the reign of his father, George was instead eager to recover the prerogatives that his grandmother Anne and her brother-in-law, William of Orange, had. Often applying his power of veto and dismembering a plot to have him killed and place one of his younger brothers on the throne, the people of London would revolt against Parliament once news filtered from the palace that the King had "almost been killed" by Whig partisans. Contrary to parliamentary rethoric, George did not install absolute rule but instead issued a charter - combining the ideology of the Stuarts with the teachings and passings of the Glorious Revolution into one - The King's Charter. The role of the Prime Minister was set down, a branching of political power in the person of the King, the two houses of Parliament and the Supreme Court of the United Kingdom. While the royals would obtain many powers from George's role in the subversion of Parliamentary supremacy, George would nonetheless rule with Parliament for his whole reign, never over it, contributting to the political balance of the realm.

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George would marry in 1742 to Princess Friederike Luise of Prussia, beginning what European historians called the "Diplomatic Revolution". After the death of Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire, his son (his only son from a brood with five daughters) Joseph the II, fearing the growing ambition of powers like Saxony, Prussia and Bavaria decided to abandon his traditional rivalry with France, inheriting the legacy of defeat of war in the Low Countries and the loss of the Austrian Netherlands to France. Realigning with France and Russia, abandoning the alliance with Great Britain, this left much of the smaller continental European powers guideless. George would - through family ties and alliances of occasion - form detente with various European powers to beat off this alliance - The Kingdom of Prussia, home to the Queen, was the first to join George, with Sweden - ruled by Gustav III Vilhelm, the son of William of Gloucester, James VIII's younger brother and Ulrika Eleanora, Queen of Sweden. As Austria and France made ouvertures to Spain following George's diplomatic manouveurs, it backfired, as the Netherlands - where the Orangist Statholders had managed to keep a great degree of power following William of Orange's death and Portugal, threatened by Spain both in Europe and in Southern Brazil and ruled by George's cousin, Henry the II. This close alliance of minor powers under Britain's lead - The Netherlands, Sweden, Prussia and Portugal would rise up to challenge the continental hegemony as war broke out in 1749 in Canada between British and French colonial forces, a casus bellii that started what was called the "Eleven years war", with Britain and it's allies coming out victorious.

While countries such as the Netherlands and Prussia looked, at the time, as the most profitable winners of the war - as France and the Netherlands came to an accord to divide the lower Netherlands, Flanders going to the Dutch Republic while Prussia cemented it's control over Pomerania, gained Hamburg and Silesia, Britain came out of the war with a growing influence over the continent and supremacy in colonial affairs - having gained Louisiana and Canada from the French and becoming the dominant power in India.

George and his wife would have four children, beginning the "British Imperial Era", also known as the Georgian age. He was succeeded by his son, George, Prince of Wales.

[3] George Frederick Christian Augustus was born in November 1744, to King George I and Queen Frederica, as the second child, but eldest son. He would receive tutoring from Martin Folkes, with whom, many believe gave, George, his future views.

Although George was 0.05 meters smaller than his father, he was still seen as a large figure in British politics, for when he came of age, George would use his residence to became a frequent meeting place of different individuals, writers, scientists, inventors and statesmen discussing new ideas regarding culture, technology, and diplomacy.

George would also take up his seat in the House of Lords, through this office, he would support and become patron of many new members of the house of common, for example, he would support a colonial agent from Pennsylvania, Dr. Benjamin Franklin to represent a new political party, that would rival both the Tories and the Whigs, the Democratic Party.
This party would push the Whigs from opposition to obscurity and once George himself came to the throne, they would become the ruling party for a majority of his reign.

In 1763, George married Princess Caroline of Hesse-Darmstadt (1746–1821), the eldest daughter of Louis IX, Landgrave of Hesse-Darmstadt and his wife Countess Palatine Caroline of Zweibrücken-Birkenfeld. This marriage was contracted for diplomatic and political reasons, with Great Britain wanting to have closer ties with the the Protestant states within the Holy Roman Empire, and it was his mother, Frederica of Prussia, arranging with her family, a German wife.

Caroline’s brother, would become Landgrave Louis X (1753–1830), later Grand Duke Louis I, while her sisters went on to have royal matches; Princess Frederica (1751–1805), married King Friedrich Wilhelm II of Prussia; Princess Amalie (1754–1832), married her first cousin Karl Ludwig, Grand Duke of Baden; Princess Wilhelmina (1755–1776), married Emperor Petrovich of Russia, and Princess Luise (1757–1830), married Karl August, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach.

The marriage was able to produce many healthy children but also developed into a loving personal relationship, which spanned 44 years.

His nickname would come from his generosity with political reforms showing that devolution didn’t have to mean diminishing his authority, but instead allowed his laws to be passed across the empire, from the American Dominion Assembly in Philadelphia to the Bombay Governors office, with support of local officials as well as keeping the vast colonies running efficiency.

Queen Caroline awoke to find George dead next to her in bed, having slipped away peaceful in his sleep, following a short illness, she would alert the guards, who informed his successor, George III, as well as the prime minister to address parliament.

[4] Born in 1768 as the eldest surviving child of King George II and Queen Caroline, George grew up to become a vain prince who loved partying, drinking, and women. His terrible temper caused many people to detest the idea of having him be their future king, with Jacobitism and even Republicanism rising in popularity during the final years of George II’s reign. But tradition was strong and George succeeded his father as King of Great Britain.

The biggest event that occurred during George’s reign was the Spanish Revolution, which saw the country's monarchy get overthrown and replaced by a radical republic that wanted to spread their influence across Europe. Worried by what Spain could do to them, Europe's great powers came together to form a coalition to defeat the republic and restore the Wittelsbachs, who had escaped the revolutionaries clutches and were ruling from their American colonies in exile. Great Britain was part of the coalition and although they were successful in containing Republicanism to Iberia, Spain was able to invade Portugal and establish a sister republic there.

Another problem George had to deal with was James Henry Stuart, the current Jacobite pretender at the time. Known to his supporters as James IX & IV, the prince served in the French army and was a close friend of Charles X of France. He was also popular among the British populace due to his support of Irish sovereignty. This made George worried that the Jacobites would try to overthrow him, though no attempts were made.

George married in 1801 to Duchess Luise of Württemberg, though it didn’t result in any children due to the couple’s total disinterest in each other. In fact, Luise was reportedly glad to hear the news of her husband’s death from heath issues in 1819 just as the two were about to divorce. Thus George’s brother, Frederick, Duke of Kendal and Kent, would succeed him on the throne.

[5] Charles Augustus Frederick George was the seventh child and four son of King George II and Caroline, born in 1781. His birth had been complicated and resulted in permanent withering of his left leg, caused by damage done to the nerves in his leg.
From an early age his disability put him at a disadvantage, not being able receive a military training like his other brothers, instead he had to rely upon his ability of wit and knowledge.

He briefly considered becoming a cleric in the Church of England, having taken tutorage from numerous bishops during his educational years, however tragedy struck the family, when the third brother, Edward, Duke of Gloucester and Ross, born 1774, whom had yet to marry, had served in the Royal Navy and sadly was lost at sea, when their ship was sunk battling a pirate fleet, in 1795, while the second brother, William, Duke of York and Edinburgh, born 1769, died from consumption in 1801, without issue with his wife, Sophia of Prussia.

This placed the fourth son to the position of third in line and then on the passing of his father, at the age of 27, Charles became heir presumptive to his brother.

During his brother’s 11 year reign, Charles would spend time sitting in for him, during parliamentary meetings, seeing contempt in the eyes of the public officers; if it wasn’t the drunk, womanising, party animal, leading them, it was the crippled and uncharismatic spare, with Charles being compared to the disfigured Elizabeth statesman, Robert Cecil, 1st Earl of Salisbury.

This did not hinder is ability to debate politics and he still became a sort after bachelor, with brides from all of Europe seeking an audience. With in a year, in 1809, Charles would propose to his cousin, Princess Caroline Louise of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach, daughter of Charles Augustus, Grand Duke of Saxe-Weimar-Eisenach and Charles’s aunt, Princess Louisa of Hesse-Darmstadt.
The match was seen as a perfect one, the pair having written to each other from a young age, as well as Caroline being a kind soul, forging a loving and caring relationship with her husband. They would only produce two children but were happy with their small family.

When he succeeded his brother, many expected him to chose an alternative name, but Charles persisted that his parents and everyone he knew by his Christian name and didn’t care that the young Jacobite pretender, had used it, Charles Oldenburg was the rightful king and would use his name with pride.

His own reign would be remembered for securing trade with the monarchies of Europe, Asia and Wittelsbach’s monarchy in the Americas while isolating the Iberian Peninsula. As well as restoring trust in the monarchy.
Sadly his reign came to an abrupt end when he suffered a stroke at the age of 44, in 1825, being succeeded by his only son, William.

[6] Born the first child (and only son) of King Charles, William Frederick George Christian, was born in New Orleans in 1810, during his parent's honeymoon in the American colonies, while his father led negotiations with the Wittelsbach's Empire-in-Exile, thus, earning forever the moniker "the Colonial", although much of his life would be spent in Great Britain. William became King at the age of 15, staying under the regency of his grief-striken mother and the only remaining Oldenburg "dukes" left, all other lineages having been wiped out, Duke Frederick of Cumberland.

When he did come of age, though, William faced a long series of crisis and personal mistakes that cost him the peace and quiet he would only achieve later in his reign, as the whole world seemed to come crashing down. In America, British colonists came into conflict with Wittelsbach Mexico as they ventured further and further west, breaking both into Texas and even California. While many expected war to break out between the powers, with the Prime Minister and the American Grand Consul almost forcing him into signing a war declaration, the death of King-Emperor Ferdinand saw the Spanish overseas Empire divided into four crowns - the eldest son, Carlos, would become Emperor of Mexico, King of Spain and sovereign over the Caribbean, the second, Juan, would become the first Emperor of Peru, while the youngest's, Ferdinand and Diego would become Kings of Colombia and Argentina respectivelly, with the youngest children theoritically beholden to Carlos in Mexico. Mexico, was however, in a competition of development with the other three hispanic realms and thus would offer to sell both California and Texas to Great Britain in exchange for a great sum. The "Purchase of the West", as remembered in American history, started the great alliance between the British Empire and the Hispanic monarchies and cemented the whole of the Americas into the British sphere of influence.

Furthermore, internal division inside the American dominion saw to it that instead of one large American Dominion, there would be various, smaller Dominions that would more easily manage the British American territories. Thus, the American Dominion was divided into many, while many previously directed territories, such as Louisiana, Ohio, Canada, Texas, Michigan and others were elevated to Dominion status.

William would also make the mistake of falling in love with the wrong woman. While the Franco-British rivalry had mostly abated with the emergence of Republican Spain, France and Britain still were the premier European powers and competed for influence all over the continent and the world. This did not stop him from falling in love with King Jean's the V's famed beauty of a daughter, Princess Charlotte of France. They met during a visit to Berlin for the marriage of the King of Prussia and the King's sister, Amalie, where it is said that the young princess outshone Amalie of Britain. While it is unrecorded if Princess Amalie was affronted by Charlotte's stunning appearance at her own wedding, she is the first recording of a budding romance between the King and the "frenchwoman". William would have his office arrange two visits to France in the two following years, alongside one of the most extensive pen-pal relationships of the 19th century between the two. Charlotte's father would eventually be convinced by Charlotte to allow her to marry William, and the future Queen of Great Britain finally stepped down in London in 1833. Charlotte was a catholic, which made her deeply unpopular with the political establishment, but Charlotte would, over the years, prove a great boon to the monarchy. Her kindness, fashion sense and patronage of the poor workers, the Irish and of London's arts would make her the most popular, and important, British Queen since Anne herself.

William's reign was tumultuous, as the British Empire would gain South Africa and much of Indonesia from the Dutch during a war, alongside participating in the liberation of Greece from the Ottomans and conquering Egypt from the same. William would become the first "Emperor of America" and "Emperor of India", while South Africa, Australia and New Zealand and much of the American West going the direction of expanding the Dominions of Britain overseas.

William and his wife had seven children together, although William would die from lung cancer caused by smoking in 1854. He left for his heir,_______, the World's largest Empire ever.
 
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