List of monarchs III

Discussion in 'Alternate History Discussion: Before 1900' started by Shiva, Nov 17, 2014.

  1. Shiva Dreaming... always dreaming...

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Location:
    A comfy couch
    List of monarchs III
    Since the last list fell apart and people discussed making a new thread with some formal rules, and no one's updated the list on the last thread, here's the new thread.​
    The rules are simple.​
    1. Each poster get's one entry per list and must wait for at least one post by someone else before adding another entry.​
    2. Each entry must be logical, realistic (nothing involving Aliens, Magic, Time Travel, etc.), and with a footnote with information on their reign.​
    3. There can be no more than two active lists at any given time, splitting ONE list into TWO is allowed but MUST BE REALISTIC, and they have to be in the same timeline, so to speak.​
    4. Whoever finishes a list gets to start the next list, if they don't start the list within 24 hours then it's fair game for everyone else.​
    5. If there isn't an update on the list in three days then it is dead and a new list can be proposed. ​
    6. If the Original Poster of a list doesn't include a time limit of when the list ends, then the list HAS to continue to the present day or if the list fails due to the TL ending, or it isn't updated in three days time. WARNING: If you start something in the ancient era, like Ancient Egypt or Rome then for the sake of everyone else PLEASE set a timelimit, otherwise we will have things like Ramses XXXIII to deal with and keep track of.
    7. Formatting: Date of Reign is bolded but left black. Monarch + House is bolded and colored, the color corresponds to the House in question. Footnotes are bolded, information is not. For example (using parentheses instead of brackets):
    (B)1848 - 1916: (color)Franz Joseph (House of Habsburg-Lothringen)(/color)[1](/B)​
    Example post:​
    Kings of England
    1485 - 1487: Henry VII (House of Tudor) [1]
    1487 - 1535: Richard IV (House of York/Simnel) [2]
    1535 - 1556: Richard V (House of York/Simnel) [3]
    [1] Overthrew Richard III and established the brief 'House of Tudor' until the Yorkish Revolution of 1487 saw Henry's assassination and the restoration of the Yorks under 'Richard IV'.​
    [2] The figurehead of the Yorkish rebellion, suspected by many to be an imposter named Lambert Simnel (proven in the modern era through DNA testing). Never the less Richard IV was able to build up support in the restored Yorkish government and managed to escape being a puppet and ruled England in his own right, passing the crown to his son, Richard V.​
    [3] The reign of Richard V witnessed the rise of the 'Cranmerists', a radical branch of Protestantism that was persecuted by Richard V. Despite this a golden age of literature and the arts prospered in his reign. When the king died of the sweating sickness in 1556 he passed the crown to ____.​
    Now as you can see the blank space is for a name for the next poster to write, if you HAVE to include the heir in your post then do _____ <---- that for the name and gender.​
    Oh and advice on female monarchs, a woman doesn't have to mean that a dynasty ends, she could marry a cousin or her husband could be low-ranked enough that her successor keeps the dynastic name, or hell she could establish a line of female monarchs and the name passes with them. Be creative!​
    Let's begin!​
    (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)
    Kings of England
    1135 - 1151: William IV (House of Norman) [1]
    [1] When William IV took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named _____ late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.​
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2014
  2. PoorBoy Laborus Tardis

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2005
    Location:
    ~49°N; 123°W (±30′)
    So, there's no Billy the Third in this TL? I shall fix that:

    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [1]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
     
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  3. KingofArkham The Mad King of Arkham

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2013
    Location:
    Lancashire, England
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness
     
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  4. Jonathan Corbynite with fire in heart & food in belly

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    Kent, England, United Kingdom
    OOC: Really glad this has started again with better rules, especially seeing the old one fall into decay :(

    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256 Henry II (House of Norman) [4]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry threatening them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
     
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  5. Shiva Dreaming... always dreaming...

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Location:
    A comfy couch
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, _____.
     
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  6. ImperialVienna Franz Joseph's Moustache

    Joined:
    Feb 2, 2007
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard (House of Norman) [6]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.

    Point of Inquiry: Is House of Norman supposed to be House of Normandy? Or am I missing something?
     
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  7. alex costa Just an average Portuguese guy

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2012
    Location:
    Portugal
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard (House of Norman) [6]
    1301-1304: Sucession Crisis [7]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was_____ Earl of ______ who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304

    Point of Inquiry: Is House of Norman supposed to be House of Normandy? Or am I missing something?

    It is indeed the House of Normandy.
     
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  8. Zorqal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Location:
    DC
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard (House of Norman) [6]
    1301-1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
     
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  9. ByzantineLover Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Nov 11, 2012
    Location:
    Canberra, Australia
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard (House of Norman) [6]
    1301-1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund (House d'Aubigny) [9]

    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, ______.
    __________________
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2014
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  10. G.Bone lurks

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2004
    Location:
    Hon., HI
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard (House of Norman) [6]
    1301-1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund (House d'Aubigny) [9]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [9] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince ______ followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince ____ soon declared himself King.
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2014
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  11. PoorBoy Laborus Tardis

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2005
    Location:
    ~49°N; 123°W (±30′)
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard (House of Norman) [6]
    1301-1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund (House d'Aubigny) [9]
    1326 - 1332: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [10]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [9] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [10] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
     
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  12. Zorqal Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Apr 20, 2013
    Location:
    DC
    Someone combined the two Edmunds into one in the list, but got rid of Richard II's information. I'm going to try and fix it, so sorry if any stories get a little messed up.

    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard (House of Norman) [6]
    1301-1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]

    1326 - 1331: Edmund (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]



    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
     
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  13. Shiva Dreaming... always dreaming...

    Joined:
    Aug 21, 2014
    Location:
    A comfy couch
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]

    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]

    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
     
    Last edited: Nov 18, 2014
    The Champion likes this.
  14. PoorBoy Laborus Tardis

    Joined:
    Oct 16, 2005
    Location:
    ~49°N; 123°W (±30′)
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]

    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]

    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]
    1379 - 1388: Agatha (House d'Aubigny) [14]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
    [14] Agatha became heiress upon the unexpected death of her only brother, Prince Jacob, due to a heart attack. Married to Floris, the Count of Holland, she found herself overlord to the King of Scotland, and vassal to the King of France (in Normandy and Gascony) and potentially, to the Holy Roman Emperor (due to her husband being Count of Holland). The French King used this opportunity to invade her French domains by invoking agnatic succession. She successfully appealed to the Emperor for aid through her husband, and turned the Western Schism into a Great War. She decided to retire as Queen and Duchess in the middle of the war in 1388 in favour of her son, _______, in an attempt to legitimize succession in Normandy and Gascony.
     
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  15. KingofArkham The Mad King of Arkham

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2013
    Location:
    Lancashire, England
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]
    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]
    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]
    1379 - 1388: Agatha (House d'Aubigny) [14]
    1388 - 1420 : Innocent III (House of Otterburn) [15]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
    [14] Agatha became heiress upon the unexpected death of her only brother, Prince Jacob, due to a heart attack. Married to Floris, the Count of Holland, she found herself overlord to the King of Scotland, and vassal to the King of France (in Normandy and Gascony) and potentially, to the Holy Roman Emperor (due to her husband being Count of Holland). The French King used this opportunity to invade her French domains by invoking agnatic succession. She successfully appealed to the Emperor for aid through her husband, and turned the Western Schism into a Great War. She decided to retire as Queen and Duchess in the middle of the war in 1388 in favour of her son, Innocent III, in an attempt to legitimize succession in Normandy and Gascony.
    [15] Innocent III, chose to discard his father's name to take a new name in the name of his castle, Otterburn with his house now know as the House of Otterburn and continued the Great War to its end with combined forces of Hapsburg and the forces of the Otterburn King victorious against the French King. The following peace treaty releases the Otterburn King from his vassalage to the French King and towards the end of his king, he is crowned as King of Normandy and Gascony, raising the former duchies to Kingdoms
     
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  16. G.Bone lurks

    Joined:
    Jan 1, 2004
    Location:
    Hon., HI
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]
    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]
    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]
    1379 - 1388: Agatha (House d'Aubigny) [14]
    1388 - 1420 : Innocent III (House of Otterburn) [15]
    1420 - 1445 : Roger (House of Otterburn) [16]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
    [14] Agatha became heiress upon the unexpected death of her only brother, Prince Jacob, due to a heart attack. Married to Floris, the Count of Holland, she found herself overlord to the King of Scotland, and vassal to the King of France (in Normandy and Gascony) and potentially, to the Holy Roman Emperor (due to her husband being Count of Holland). The French King used this opportunity to invade her French domains by invoking agnatic succession. She successfully appealed to the Emperor for aid through her husband, and turned the Western Schism into a Great War. She decided to retire as Queen and Duchess in the middle of the war in 1388 in favour of her son, Innocent III, in an attempt to legitimize succession in Normandy and Gascony.
    [15] Innocent III, chose to discard his father's name to take a new name in the name of his castle, Otterburn with his house now know as the House of Otterburn and continued the Great War to its end with combined forces of Hapsburg and the forces of the Otterburn King victorious against the French King. The following peace treaty releases the Otterburn King from his vassalage to the French King and towards the end of his king, he is crowned as King of Normandy and Gascony, raising the former duchies to Kingdoms
    [16] Roger is known as the 'Ship' or 'Talking' King. He focused on infrastructure linking his Norman and Gascony realms with that of England/Scotland/Wales. He is listed as the first English King to visit Denmark, the Holy Roman Empire, and Sweden. Roger negotiated the marriage of his firstborn son _____ to Princess ____ of the Holy Roman Empire. Roger helped to found the practice of letters of marquis against France. His crowning achievement is the "First" Royal Navy. Roger died of disease with his son _______ assuming the throne.
     
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  17. alex costa Just an average Portuguese guy

    Joined:
    Mar 24, 2012
    Location:
    Portugal
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]
    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]
    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]
    1379 - 1388: Agatha (House d'Aubigny) [14]
    1388 - 1420 : Innocent III (House of Otterburn) [15]
    1420 - 1445 : Roger (House of Otterburn) [16]
    1445 - 1466 : Edmund III (House of Otterburn)[17]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
    [14] Agatha became heiress upon the unexpected death of her only brother, Prince Jacob, due to a heart attack. Married to Floris, the Count of Holland, she found herself overlord to the King of Scotland, and vassal to the King of France (in Normandy and Gascony) and potentially, to the Holy Roman Emperor (due to her husband being Count of Holland). The French King used this opportunity to invade her French domains by invoking agnatic succession. She successfully appealed to the Emperor for aid through her husband, and turned the Western Schism into a Great War. She decided to retire as Queen and Duchess in the middle of the war in 1388 in favour of her son, Innocent III, in an attempt to legitimize succession in Normandy and Gascony.
    [15] Innocent III, chose to discard his father's name to take a new name in the name of his castle, Otterburn with his house now know as the House of Otterburn and continued the Great War to its end with combined forces of Hapsburg and the forces of the Otterburn King victorious against the French King. The following peace treaty releases the Otterburn King from his vassalage to the French King and towards the end of his king, he is crowned as King of Normandy and Gascony, raising the former duchies to Kingdoms
    [16] Roger is known as the 'Ship' or 'Talking' King. He focused on infrastructure linking his Norman and Gascony realms with that of England/Scotland/Wales. He is listed as the first English King to visit Denmark, the Holy Roman Empire, and Sweden. Roger negotiated the marriage of his firstborn son Edmund to Princess Marie of the Holy Roman Empire. Roger helped to found the practice of letters of marquis against France. His crowning achievement is the "First" Royal Navy. Roger died of disease with his son Edmund assuming the throne.
    [17]During his reign Edmund III continued to expand the Royal Navy further. He also established an alliance with his father-in-law and the King ________ of Denmark marrying his eldest daugther__________ to the Heir of the Throne of Denmark. It was also during his reign that the Kings of England after winning a short War against France managed to finally get recogition of English rule over Normandy and Gascony. He also managed to turn the Duchy of Britanny into a vassal. Economically he kept the Jews rights protected and was also a patron of the arts. His first born son______ who married the only daugther and heir of the Duke of Scotland would succed him then in 1466 after his death finally uniting the thrones of England and Scotland again.
     
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  18. KingofArkham The Mad King of Arkham

    Joined:
    Sep 21, 2013
    Location:
    Lancashire, England
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]
    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]
    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]
    1379 - 1388: Agatha (House d'Aubigny) [14]
    1388 - 1420 : Innocent III (House of Otterburn) [15]
    1420 - 1445 : Roger (House of Otterburn) [16]
    1445 - 1466 : Edmund III (House of Otterburn)[17]
    1466 - 1494 : Innocent IV (House of Otterburn) [18]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
    [14] Agatha became heiress upon the unexpected death of her only brother, Prince Jacob, due to a heart attack. Married to Floris, the Count of Holland, she found herself overlord to the King of Scotland, and vassal to the King of France (in Normandy and Gascony) and potentially, to the Holy Roman Emperor (due to her husband being Count of Holland). The French King used this opportunity to invade her French domains by invoking agnatic succession. She successfully appealed to the Emperor for aid through her husband, and turned the Western Schism into a Great War. She decided to retire as Queen and Duchess in the middle of the war in 1388 in favour of her son, Innocent III, in an attempt to legitimize succession in Normandy and Gascony.
    [15] Innocent III, chose to discard his father's name to take a new name in the name of his castle, Otterburn with his house now know as the House of Otterburn and continued the Great War to its end with combined forces of Hapsburg and the forces of the Otterburn King victorious against the French King. The following peace treaty releases the Otterburn King from his vassalage to the French King and towards the end of his king, he is crowned as King of Normandy and Gascony, raising the former duchies to Kingdoms
    [16] Roger is known as the 'Ship' or 'Talking' King. He focused on infrastructure linking his Norman and Gascony realms with that of England/Scotland/Wales. He is listed as the first English King to visit Denmark, the Holy Roman Empire, and Sweden. Roger negotiated the marriage of his firstborn son Edmund to Princess Marie of the Holy Roman Empire. Roger helped to found the practice of letters of marquis against France. His crowning achievement is the "First" Royal Navy. Roger died of disease with his son Edmund assuming the throne.
    [17]During his reign Edmund III continued to expand the Royal Navy further. He also established an alliance with his father-in-law and King Christian I of Denmark marrying his eldest daugther Margaret to the Heir of the Throne of Denmark. It was also during his reign that the Kings of England after winning a short War against France managed to finally get recogition of English rule over Normandy and Gascony. He also managed to turn the Duchy of Britanny into a vassal. Economically he kept the Jews rights protected and was also a patron of the arts. His first born son Innocent IV who married the only daugther and heir of the Duke of Scotland would succed him then in 1466 after his death finally uniting the thrones of England and Scotland again.
    [18] Innocent IV succeeded his father and during his reign oversaw wars with France and Sweden with first Christian I of Denmark as his ally, followed by Christian I's son and his cousin John of Denmark. Innocent IV was also briefly considered for the Imperial throne of the Holy Roman Empire before it was decided that it would give him too much power. Innocent IV died in 1494 after falling from his horse in Normandy
     
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  19. LSCatilina Vassican Labosiotos Vergagnatos

    Joined:
    Dec 5, 2008
    Location:
    Polanian Occupation Zone in Transylvania
    Kings of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?)

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]
    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]
    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]
    1379 - 1388: Agatha (House d'Aubigny) [14]
    1388 - 1420 : Innocent III (House of Otterburn) [15]
    1420 - 1445 : Roger (House of Otterburn) [16]
    1445 - 1466 : Edmund III (House of Otterburn)[17]
    1466 - 1494 : Innocent IV (House of Otterburn) [18]
    1494-1498 : Edmund IV (House of Otterburn)[19]


    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
    [14] Agatha became heiress upon the unexpected death of her only brother, Prince Jacob, due to a heart attack. Married to Floris, the Count of Holland, she found herself overlord to the King of Scotland, and vassal to the King of France (in Normandy and Gascony) and potentially, to the Holy Roman Emperor (due to her husband being Count of Holland). The French King used this opportunity to invade her French domains by invoking agnatic succession. She successfully appealed to the Emperor for aid through her husband, and turned the Western Schism into a Great War. She decided to retire as Queen and Duchess in the middle of the war in 1388 in favour of her son, Innocent III, in an attempt to legitimize succession in Normandy and Gascony.
    [15] Innocent III, chose to discard his father's name to take a new name in the name of his castle, Otterburn with his house now know as the House of Otterburn and continued the Great War to its end with combined forces of Hapsburg and the forces of the Otterburn King victorious against the French King. The following peace treaty releases the Otterburn King from his vassalage to the French King and towards the end of his king, he is crowned as King of Normandy and Gascony, raising the former duchies to Kingdoms
    [16] Roger is known as the 'Ship' or 'Talking' King. He focused on infrastructure linking his Norman and Gascony realms with that of England/Scotland/Wales. He is listed as the first English King to visit Denmark, the Holy Roman Empire, and Sweden. Roger negotiated the marriage of his firstborn son Edmund to Princess Marie of the Holy Roman Empire. Roger helped to found the practice of letters of marquis against France. His crowning achievement is the "First" Royal Navy. Roger died of disease with his son Edmund assuming the throne.
    [17]During his reign Edmund III continued to expand the Royal Navy further. He also established an alliance with his father-in-law and King Christian I of Denmark marrying his eldest daugther Margaret to the Heir of the Throne of Denmark. It was also during his reign that the Kings of England after winning a short War against France managed to finally get recogition of English rule over Normandy and Gascony. He also managed to turn the Duchy of Britanny into a vassal. Economically he kept the Jews rights protected and was also a patron of the arts. His first born son Innocent IV who married the only daugther and heir of the Duke of Scotland would succed him then in 1466 after his death finally uniting the thrones of England and Scotland again.
    [18] Innocent IV succeeded his father and during his reign oversaw wars with France and Sweden with first Christian I of Denmark as his ally, followed by Christian I's son and his cousin John of Denmark. Innocent IV was also briefly considered for the Imperial throne of the Holy Roman Empire before it was decided that it would give him too much power. Innocent IV died in 1494 after falling from his horse in Normandy

    [19] After Innocent IV death, his son rose to the throne. He made peace with France, but maintained English participation to the Second Scandinavian War. He was injuried in 1497 at the Battle of Flensborg but while the wound was superficial, he died in Febuary 1498 from an infection without issue.
     
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  20. Jonathan Corbynite with fire in heart & food in belly

    Joined:
    Nov 30, 2013
    Location:
    Kent, England, United Kingdom
    Monarchs of England (What if William Adelin survived the White Ship disaster?) (1135 - 1498 )

    1135 - 1151: William III (House of Norman) [1]
    1151 - 1174: Roland I (House of Norman) [2]
    1174 - 1214: William IV (House of Norman) [3]
    1214 - 1256: Henry II (House of Norman) [4]
    1256 - 1295: Innocent I (House of Norman) [5]
    1295 - 1301: Richard I (House of Norman) [6]
    1301 - 1304: Sucession Crisis [7]
    1304 - 1321: Richard II (House d'Aubigny) [8]
    1321 - 1326: Edmund I (House d'Aubigny) [9]
    1326 - 1331: Edmund II (House d'Aubigny) [10]
    1331 - 1337: Jacob (House d'Aubigny) [11]
    1337 - 1350: Roland II (House d'Aubigny) [12]
    1350 - 1379: Innocent II (House d'Aubigny) [13]
    1379 - 1388: Agatha (House d'Aubigny) [14]
    1388 - 1420 : Innocent III (House of Otterburn) [15]
    1420 - 1445 : Roger (House of Otterburn) [16]
    1445 - 1466 : Edmund III (House of Otterburn)[17]
    1466 - 1494 : Innocent IV (House of Otterburn) [18]
    1494 - 1498 : Edmund IV (House of Otterburn)[19]

    Monarchs of England and Scotland (1498 -)
    1498 - 1532 : Graham and Mary (House of Otterburn)[18]




    [1] When William III took the throne, England was stable enough, though he had to settle his father's debts and faced agitation from his relation Stephen of Blois who viewed himself as William's heir, however William's wife Matilda of Anjou bore him an heir named Roland late in life. It was problems in Normandy, William's French Dukedom that would dominate his reign since the French Kings disliked having a foreign monarch that held land within France (and so close to Paris as well). William died at age 48 of what is believed to be liver cancer.
    [2] Was 11 years old when he took the throne. Had to fend off periodic raids and attempts to usurp the Norman throne from Stephen's second son, William of Blois, which were covertly sponsored by the French king. Died of a hunting accident when he fell off his horse in Normandy.
    [3] Ascended the throne of England at the age of 13. Spent ten years of the beginning of his reign in Normandy, dealing with raids from French troops (sent by Louis VII of France) until the ascenion of a new King (Philip II became King of France in 1180) whose personal dislike of Count Henry of Blois (son of William) saw him enter into an alliance with William IV. The power held by Henry was vastly reduced after the loss of Chartres in the later years of the reign of William IV. William IV died aged 53 after a long two year illness.
    [4] Henry was 22 when his father William IV died, he had been nicknamed "Henry the Loyal" because in 1212, he had been approached by William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke to kill his ill father and take the Kingdom sooner, Henry rushed straight to his father's side and informed him of this plot, King William IV executed all the conspirers and honoured Henry with the title of Prince of Wales and made him his regent when William's health began to worsen.
    King Henry's 42 year reign was marked mainly with the increase of Jewish communities, with Henry treating them with respect meaning the English economy began to flourish and became one of the most prosperous in Europe, to the annoyance of Pope Gregory IX, who saw this as un-christian and an attack on his policy of Papal Supremacy.
    [5] The only surviving son of Henry II, Innocent continued his father's policy of Jewish toleration. Surviving records indicate that this was due more to his need of money to fund his wars than any actual liking of the Jewish people on his part. Innocent was forced to fight for the Duchy of Gascony after Philip IV of France attempted to declare it forfeit. Innocent also found himself fighting Llywelyn ap Gruffudd, the 'Prince of Wales', and despite Llywelyn winning several victories, ultimately it was Innocent who prevailed and conquered Wales. Innocent did play a more diplomatic role when Alexander III of Scotland died with only a girl-child as an heir, Margaret the Maid of Norway. Margaret was wed to Innocent's only surviving heir, Richard.
    [6] Neither Richard nor his Queen were particularly healthy, a tragedy for both England and Scotland. Margaret died in childbirth, while Richard succumbed a few weeks later to the melancholy that followed after the death of his wife and stillbirth of his daughter. His death caused a succession crisis, with no living siblings or male first cousins of patrilineal descent to ascend the throne.
    [7] After the death of both the King and Queen a Sucession War begun as many nobles begun fighting for the Throne of England. In Scotland the Clansman nominated Malcom Dunkeld King of Scotland. Malcom also wished to claim the throne of England and managed to rally the North Earls under him but opposing him was Richard d'Aubigny, Earl of Arundel who defeated him in battle near York and was crowned King of England in 1304
    [8] Crowned King of England after defeating Malcom of Scotland, Richard II d'Aubigny set about increasing his legitimacy to the lords of England who had stayed loyal, all those other than Northumberland. He greatly increased the size of his home lordship of Arundel, greatly increasing the size of the harbor and beginning construction of a great castle there.
    [9] The eldest son of Richard II. After 4 years of peace, the Jewish matter finally came to a head when Pope John XXII told the King to expel the Jews from England or face excommunication. Edmund boldly refused, giving King Philip V of France all the excuse he needed to invade Gascony and Normandy. Sailing from Sussex to stop him, the English King achieved some success until he was wounded in the neck by a Genovese crossbowman. Despite the best efforts of his physicians, the wound became gangrenous and King Edmund died in Gascony. Edmund's younger brother, John, had become a priest, so the throne passed to the King's eldest son, Edmund.
    [10] Edmund continued the war against the "French" Crusade for the next 5 years with limited success. King Edward was often referred to as the 'Caretaker' King due to this reason. His brother Prince René followed his father's footsteps and started to overshadow the King due to numerous victories over the Crusader Army. This created tension within the English Army and in 1326 King Edmund died by a "mysterious Viennese assassin" who poisoned his cup of wine. Prince René soon declared himself King Jacob.
    [11] Naming himself Jacob pretty much earned the ire of of the Pope, the French, and even the Burgundians, who accused him of converting to Judaism (FYI, Jacob = Israel). Despite resounding successes in battle, the last straw for most of Western Europe was the attempted assassination of his uncle John, the Bishop of Aire and Prince of England. This drew Navarre and Leon into the Crusade. Jacob was killed in the battle of Angers in 1332.
    [12] Roland II, Jacob's cousin, quickly expelled the Jews as the Pope had asked, being a devout Catholic since his birth. He continued his ancestor Richard II's policy of expanding the city of Arundel, and declared that his capital. The castle begun under Richard II finally finished construction in 1347, and the King moved his court and family there. He invited the Pope to his first feast held in the castle, but he rather rudely refused, showing the feud between England and other Catholics was not yet over.
    [13] Roland's only living son, Innocent II was known as the 'English Hercules' due to his height of 6'3 and being heavily muscled (unusual for the era). Known for falling asleep during mass, Innocent was disinterested in religion and quietly allowed several Jewish families to return. When the Pope complained, Innocent sent him a blistering letter calling him a hypocrite due to allowing the Jews in Rome to stay and using them to run the finances of the church. He got away with it due to the Papacy having fallen under a series of short-lived and corrupt Popes, in 1360 there was a Year of Three Popes that led to a disputed election over the successor of Pope Luke II, the end result was that there were two Popes elected, a French backed Pope Luke III and a Hapsburg backed Pope Valentine II. The Western Schism had begun and would not be resolved in Innocent's lifetime. In more local matters, Innocent dealt with a Scottish incursion known as the Battle of Otterburn led by Alexander VI and captured the Scottish King, forcing him to become an English vassal. In honor of his victory, the great castle of Arundel was named Otterburn Castle.
    [14] Agatha became heiress upon the unexpected death of her only brother, Prince Jacob, due to a heart attack. Married to Floris, the Count of Holland, she found herself overlord to the King of Scotland, and vassal to the King of France (in Normandy and Gascony) and potentially, to the Holy Roman Emperor (due to her husband being Count of Holland). The French King used this opportunity to invade her French domains by invoking agnatic succession. She successfully appealed to the Emperor for aid through her husband, and turned the Western Schism into a Great War. She decided to retire as Queen and Duchess in the middle of the war in 1388 in favour of her son, Innocent III, in an attempt to legitimize succession in Normandy and Gascony.
    [15] Innocent III, chose to discard his father's name to take a new name in the name of his castle, Otterburn with his house now know as the House of Otterburn and continued the Great War to its end with combined forces of Hapsburg and the forces of the Otterburn King victorious against the French King. The following peace treaty releases the Otterburn King from his vassalage to the French King and towards the end of his king, he is crowned as King of Normandy and Gascony, raising the former duchies to Kingdoms
    [16] Roger is known as the 'Ship' or 'Talking' King. He focused on infrastructure linking his Norman and Gascony realms with that of England/Scotland/Wales. He is listed as the first English King to visit Denmark, the Holy Roman Empire, and Sweden. Roger negotiated the marriage of his firstborn son Edmund to Princess Marie of the Holy Roman Empire. Roger helped to found the practice of letters of marquis against France. His crowning achievement is the "First" Royal Navy. Roger died of disease with his son Edmund assuming the throne.
    [17]During his reign Edmund III continued to expand the Royal Navy further. He also established an alliance with his father-in-law and King Christian I of Denmark marrying his eldest daugther Margaret to the Heir of the Throne of Denmark. It was also during his reign that the Kings of England after winning a short War against France managed to finally get recogition of English rule over Normandy and Gascony. He also managed to turn the Duchy of Britanny into a vassal. Economically he kept the Jews rights protected and was also a patron of the arts. His first born son Innocent IV who married the only daugther and heir of the Duke of Scotland would succed him then in 1466 after his death finally uniting the thrones of England and Scotland again.
    [18] Innocent IV succeeded his father and during his reign oversaw wars with France and Sweden with first Christian I of Denmark as his ally, followed by Christian I's son and his cousin John of Denmark. Innocent IV was also briefly considered for the Imperial throne of the Holy Roman Empire before it was decided that it would give him too much power. Innocent IV died in 1494 after falling from his horse in Normandy

    [19] After Innocent IV death, his son rose to the throne. He made peace with France, but maintained English participation to the Second Scandinavian War. He was injuried in 1497 at the Battle of Flensborg but while the wound was superficial, he died in Febuary 1498 from an infection without issue.
    [18] Graham being the youngest born son of Edmund III, became King of England at the age of 36 and with his marriage to Mary, a countess of Scotland, could unite the two thrones into one kingdom, however the noblemen of Scotland wanted Mary to be an equal, so Graham and Mary's joint reigned as King and Queen.
    The couple were blessed with fourteen daughters, Matilda (married John II of Portugal), Adeliza, Mabel (married Duke, Alexander Jagiellon of Lithuania), Sybilla, Anne (married John I Albert of Poland), Juliana, Constance, Henrietta (married Peter I of Savoy), Catherine, Bridget, Elizabeth (married Vladislaus II of Hungary), Mary, Jane (married John II of Aragon) and Cecily, then the fifteenth and youngest was their son, _________.
    The couple became known as "the in-laws of Europe" after strategically marring their daughters out to foreign allies.
    When Graham, died in 1532, Mary abdicated her throne for their only son, to be the King of England and Scotland.