List of monarchs III

Kings of France
Henry III, r. 1574 to 1589 (House of Valois-Angouleme)
Henry IV, r. 1589 to 1646 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (1)

Henry V, r. 1647 to 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Rene "The Usurper", r. (1646 to) 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (2)
Henry V, r. 1655 to 1678 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Francis III, r. 1678 to 1722 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (4)
Pierre I, r. 1722 to 1747 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (5)
Phillipe VII, r. 1747 to 1764 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (6)
Jean III, r. 1764 to 1800 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (7)
Phillipe VIII, r. 1800 to 1813
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (8)
Gaston I regent 1800 to 1813, r. 1813 to 1820 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (9)
Pierre II, r.1820 to 1859 (House of Bourbon-Conde)
(10)
Guillaume I, r. 1859 to 1879
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (11)
Lèopold I, r.1879 to 1897
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (12)
Henry VI, r. 1897 to 1913
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (13)
Gaston II, r. 1913 to 1920 (
House of Bourbon-Conde) (14)



(1) After the death of the King of Navarre, Henry IV became heir to the throne of France (Henry III having disinherited the Archbishop of Rouen upon the death of the King of Navarre, the Archbishop would die shortly after, before any attempt to oust the child King could be formulated) at the age of one whilst the throne of Navarre passed to Henry of Navarre's sister, Catherine II. Catherine II would die in 1604, to be succeeded by Henri de Rohan as Henri IV of Navarre, until 1638.

Henry IV of France would marry Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of James VI and I of England in 1613 when she was 17 and Henry was 25. The couple would have 13 children from 1614 to 1632, out of which 8 were boys. Only 4 of these children predeceased their father (compared to 6 who predeceased their mother). Despite his father and cousin having been lead Huegenot figures, Pope Clement insisted that the young King be raised as a devout Roman Catholic which avoided the War of Religion that had been threatened when Henry III of Navarre had been heir.

Until 1614 (for 24 years), the Premiere Prince Du Sang was the Kings uncle, the Prince of Conti (who also acted as Regent until 1606), and subsequently his ten year old cousin, Louis. Henry would later raise the countship to a dukedom upon Louis' marriage.

Henry would die in 1646 in Paris, surrounded by his children and grandchildren, to be succeeded by his son , Rene I

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(2) Rene was never meant to be King. As the legitimate heir, his nephew was still to young to rule Rene was named Regent until His Highness could ascend to the throne. However Rene abused his position to make himself the real power behind the throne ruling in all but name. His rule was fraught with challenges from backers of the heir who grew into a seemingly promising ruler, yet was continuously shut out of decision making by Rene. As a devoted Catholic Rene encouraged repression against the French Huguenots which led to the bloody Nevers Revolt in 1652. While the revolt was ultimately destroyed the Regents authority was shaken and he had to rely increasingly on various local landowners to shore up support giving them large concessions. These concessions, known to history as the Renian Concessions, would haunt his successors. In 1655 Rene would finally outmaneuver the Heir's supporters in court and force him to flee to Savoy. He was crowned King Rene I of France soon after to little fanfare and much anger among the nobility. When offers of increased privileges didn't satisfy their anger Rene resorted to military action. The resulting years of intermittent conflict saw the balance of power see-saw between the King and the nobility who largely supported the legitimate heir. In the end however Rene, never the master military strategist was killed in battle during the Battle of Calais. The crown was left to his nephew, Henry

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(3) Henry V reign had effectively begun in 1646 with the death of his grandfather, following the death of his father, Le Grand Dauphin, three years earlier. Aged only 6 at the point of his succession, his uncle, the Duke of Vendome, had taken control of court, sideload Henry and eventually taken the throne himself. In 1655, with the young King nearly of age, he fled to Savoy where he regrouped with the Duke of Soissons, and two of his other uncles, the Dukes of Orleans and Anjou, and marshalled an army that defeated the royal forces of Rene The Usurper. By Christmas of 1655, Henry V had regained his rightful place on the throne and was recrowned in a ceremony witnessed by all three of his surviving uncles, including the Duke of Orleans who had been made Regent for the next 3 year's until Henry reached 18.

He would subsequently marry Jeanne of Savoy in 1663, daughter of Philibert, Duke of Savoy, to further cement the friendship and alliance after sheltering him in 1655. The marriage would not be as fruitful as that of his grandfather, providing only three children, of whom two were daughters, named Jeanne and Christine.

After the Reneian Concessions had fielded power to the local landowners, much of Henry's reign was spent attempting to appease them. Whilst Henry V was not an adherent to the concept of the divine right of kings, having been somewhat humbled in the fight for his crown, he did believe that a strong centralised seat of government was the best option for France. Therefore, Henry considered the creation of a Parliament Francais, inspired by the English model of his Stuart relations, was the avenue to explore. Thus the remains of his reign were spent ingratiating himself with the nobility that would sit within the Parliament, and the composition would impact numerous national military and agricultural decisions that were made from 1670 to 1678.

Jeanne, Madame Royale, his eldest child, would only be 14 when her father passed away in 1678 of a heart attack. This meant that the throne passed to Dauphin Francis, his 12 year old son.

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(4) Francis III was born on 4th October 1665, Feast of St Francis of Assisi, being named in honour of the saint and his great-uncle Francis, Duke of Orleans, who was also his god father, along with King Charles II of England. His god mothers were Henrietta, Duchess of Orléans (Wife of Francis and sister of Charles II) and Mariana of Austria, Queen Regent of Spain (to support a special relationship between Spain and Holy Roman Empire)

The first 12 years of Francis’s life was happy with his parents being very involved with their children’s upbringings. He was initially under the care of royal governesses, among them being Claire, Duchess of Berry and Maria, wife ofMarshal Jean d'Estrées, Count of Estrées (1624–1707).

When Francis reached the age of seven, he was removed from the care of women and placed in the society of men. He received Francis, Duke of Orleans as his governor and was tutored by Hardouin de Péréfixe de Beaumont, Archbishop of Paris.

It was during a tutorial about French history, that Dauphin Francis received the news of his future, with his father dying of a heart attack.

Francis, Duke of Orleans, quickly transported his great-nephew to Reims Cathedral, where Charles-Maurice Le Tellier, Archbishop of Reims, crowned the 12 year old king, with 57 year old Duke, declared himself regent for the second time, but starting the new tradition of declaring his support to the king, kneeling in front of his king saying:
I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the King of France against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the Kingthat I take this obligation freely. So help me God.

For the next five years, known commonly as the “Reign of two Francises” the elder Francis would include the younger on all political matters, teaching the way of ruling as they went along.

During his sixteenth birthday, a grand party was held, in his honour. The party was also used as a match making, with nobilities of all ranks, from Viscomte to Emperors, such as Maria Antonia of Austria, daughter of Emperor Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor, Anne Marie d'Orléans, a cousin as the daughter of Francis, Duke of Orléans and of Henrietta of England.

His eyes through the night were drawn to an unlikely match, King Charles II of England had relished in being invited to a party bringing along with him, his niece, Her Highness The Lady Anne of York, second daughter of the Duke of York, and his first wife, Anne Hyde.

King Charles II was over the moon that his niece was picked as a bride for the King of France. The wedding was planned for two years later when both bride and groom turned 18, allowing the wedding to coinciding with his full coronation.

The pair were happily married, however their marriage was plagued by miscarriages and stillborns, with only 5 of the 17 pregnancies seeing the babies born healthy, it is said Francis’s love grew for his wife with each pregnancy and he shared her grief, pushing away all attempts at mistresses coming on to him.

On 6 February 1685, Charles II died without legitimate issue, leading to Anne’s father, James to inherited the thrones of England, Ireland and Scotland.
On 10 June 1688, James saw the birth of a son and heir, Prince James Francis Edward, with Francis being his middle namesake as well as his brother-in-law’s Godfather.
French spies in England, found evidence that some members of the English court were trying to take away the Divine Right of Prince James of Wales, and invite his older sister, Anglican Mary and her Protestant husband, William of Orange.

In response, Francis requested the French navy to keep an eye on the Dutch port of Hellevoetsluis, by early October, news of nearly 500 ships being organised reached France and so the great Battle of the English Channel began with Anglo-French navy defeating the Dutch fleet, killing William of Orange.

This next eight years, saw a new religious war engulf Europe, between Catholics and Protestants. The alliance between France and England grew with Francis and his father-in-law, arranging a trade agreement between the neighbouring nations, assisting each other in putting down Protestant protest as well as blockading thechannel from enemy nations.

In 1701, when news of King James II’s death reached France, Francis was publicly more affected than his wife, the daughter. Francis and Anne attended the coronation of her brother King James III.

For the last 21 years of his reign Francis saw the expansion of land in the colonies including Nova Frankia (OT Louisiana) assist his country’s economy.
However is death at the age of 57, came following a sickness he hid from the public, many modern doctors to be cancer, with a dramatic weight loss being the hardest to hide. He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son.


His majesty Francois III reviewing the artillery upon the field of Versailles, 1686.

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(5) Pierre had been Duke of Normandy at birth whilst his elder brother Francis had been Dauphin. Francis had died in a horse riding accident at 16, celebrating the fact that his bride was on the way to Paris. This meant that 13 year old Pierre was now Dauphin, his brothers betrothal to Magdalena of Soissons, daughter of the Premiere Prince Du Sang, now hinged upon him. Magdalena was 15, only two years older so the pair were not officially married until 1710. They reportedly had a happy marriage and produced several children children who survived infancy.

A big change in France occurred only one year after Pierre had ascended the throne. The Premiere Prince Du Sang, a role which had been held by his wife's family for about 130 years, held by the senior most male line descendant of a monarch who wasn't a son or grandson, shifted to the Dukes of Orleans. Francois of Orleans (son of Henry IV) had been incredibly long lived, but in 1723 his own grandson, Jean Robert, had become Duke and Premiere Prince Du Sang. This meant that any influence the Dukes of Soissons had hoped to wield through the marriage of the Queen and their role had largely evaporated.

Shortly after this transfer of position, Europe fell into the War of the Spanish Infantas. Charles III of Spain (son of Charles II and Maria Anna of Neuberg) died childless after his wife died in childbirth with their son.

Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire was the male line heir to Spain, but this would increase the Habsburg domains and influence of the HRE to a worrying level. And nobody wanted that.

But the Spanish crown could pass through a female line, and both of Charles III's sisters had male heirs - the eldest Mariana (after her grandmother) was married to James III of England and Scotland which meant that James, the Prince of Wales, was the rightful heir.

However, Louise was the wife of the Duke of Beja, brother of Joao V, King of Portugal, and she pushed for her own son as a compromise candidate to become King of Spain.

And nobody wanted either of those either. Hostilities would continue for a decade, with France backing the English candidate (Pierre and James were cousins, after all), the Holy Roman Empire pushing the Emperor and Portugal pulling together a coalition of minor nations, alongside the Russians.

In the end, the Treaty of the Hague saw Spain partitioned, with the north handed to England, and the south handed to Portugal. Nobody particularly liked it, but a decade of war had made Europe weary of the succession.

The remaining ten years of Pierres reign were peaceful, and the King died in 1747 with his wife at his side, she would survive him by 13 years, seeing his nephew, Phillipe, Duke of Anjou become King of France.


Pierre of France, exhibiting his skill at sculpting, 1746.

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(6) The final years of Pierre's reign, albeit peaceful, were full of heartache as the House of Bourbon suffered losses. From Orleans to the surviving sons of the King, it ended with the succession pointing at Stanislas-Phillipe, Duke of Anjou. The Bourbon-Anjou began with Robert, Duke of Anjou who after his marriage into the Cröy inherited the county of Fontenoy within the Imperial Duchy of Lorraine in 1645, and so as an Imperial Prince sought to make his own glory. His son; Louis-Jean, would eventually become a general of great renown, firstly serving his cousins in France, and then moving on to serve the Imperial armies in the early 1680s, the Kings of Spain later that decade, and lastly the Polish King; Jakob I Wisnowiecki, and became such a fixture of the polish court, he would marry the eldest daughter of the King; Karolina of Poland, with his son being born a full year after their wedding. That son; Stanislas-Jean, was even considered a candidate for the Polish throne in 1696 as the eldest grandson of Jakob I, but lost to his maternal cousin; Wilhelm of Teschen. Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou would return to France in 1708, bringing the so-called "Angevin Treasure" with him. A year later, he would marry the daughter of his majesty; Francis III, giving the king a grandson; Stanislas-Phillipe of Anjou.

Inheriting the throne of France at the age of 37, Stanislas-Phillipe chose the regal name of Phillipe VII for himself, and would continue his uncle's policies of Peace and the endearing will to protect that Peace. Remarkably little would threaten that Peace aside from the war of the Polish succession, where France would support the Kings cousin; Zygmunt, Prince Wisnowiecki, the grandson of Jakob I of Poland, as opposed to Frederick of Hohenzollern, elected by rebel members of the Sejm.

Phillipe VII would pass after a stroke in 1764, and the French throne would pass to Jean III.


Phillipe VII in Hunting clothes, 1748.

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(7) Jean was the second son of Phillipe VII, born Duke of Normandy, becoming Dauphin upon the death of his elder brother in 1750. After the Orleans line had been cut short, Phillipe VII had briefly been First Prince of the Blood, but upon his coronation that became the duty of the Dukes of Berry.

The male line of the Duke of Berry extended back to the youngest son of Henry IV, Charles. The Duke for much of Jean III's reign was Gaston, 5th Duke of Orleans, great great grandson of Charles. Gaston had married Yolande of Beja, daughter of the then present Duke of Beja, who also acted as Governor of Portuguese Spain.

When it came to the question of who Jean might marry, that question was answered with Gaston's daughter, Isabeau of Berry, only a year younger than the Dauphin. They married in 1761 and by the time of Jean becoming King of France, they already had a son and a daughter, and would go on to have four more children.

The continued "Age of Anjou" saw the relative peace of his father's reign continue into Jean's. Of course, there were minor skirmishes and a few colonies swapped hands in compensation or as countries needed funds. But nothing escalated to the level of the War of the Spanish Infantas, or the Battle of the Channel. Even difficulties with the colonies in Nueva Frankia were minimal, with the territories under the day to day supervsion of the Duke of Soissons as Viceroy.

This would continue to 1800 when Jean died after a bridge he was riding over collapsed and he fell into a freezing river. Although he survived, he would later die of hypothermia and be succeeded by his eldest son; Phillipe, Dauphin of France.
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(8) The Eldest of the two surviving sons of Jean III, and named for his decade older sibling; Phillippe, Dauphin of France, Phillipe inherited throne at the age of twenty eight, and despite his years, is said to have remained a child throughout. Obsessed by the French army, Phillipe VIII would often gather two or three regiments in Parade purely for his own amusement, and delight in their uniforms and drill.​
Plagued by a lack of Mental capability, it could be said that Phillipe VIII was the best king for the times, as it was the unofficial Regency council, headed by the Kings brother that slowly ushered in the Constitutional Monarchy of France, with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain.​
A.sidenote of Phillipes reign would be the death of Antoine, Duke of Berry and thus the extinction of the other lines of the house of Bourbon, aside from the Conti and the Bourbon-Soissons.​
At the age of 40, the now powerless King would pass, and it was determined that the king had choked upon his own spittle, and was succeeded by his brother; Gaston​

View attachment 589537
(9)
His eldest brother Phillipe, Dauphin of France, died aged 9, after a severe seizure, caused him to bite his tongue and bleed to death.

Without a male heir, Jean III was desperate for a son, a second son also called Phillipe was born 1772 and Gaston was born in 1775, the last child of Isabeau of Berry and named after her father, Gaston of Berry. Unlike any of his older siblings, he was born with no physical or mental disability.

While his older brother was not expected to last long, Gaston was raised and tutored in the way of running the State.

Gaston was 25 when his father died and some nobility, wished for him to claim the throne over his older brother, however Gaston believed that God had seen fit to keep Phillipe alive, only he will sit on the throne as king, while Gaston acted as his unofficial Head of Regency council.

No marriages were arranged for Phillipe as he never called for a female companion, preferring to watch soldiers parade.
As the heir to his brother Gaston was seen as the most eligible bachelor in Europe, he married in 1802, Charlotte, Princess Royal of Britain, the British isles becoming a United Kingdom under the reign of her father, Charles V.
As regent to his brother, Gaston found that trying to keep all the power under the rule of a single person, was time consuming and lead to unpopular actions being blamed solely on that person.

Over the 13 years as regent, Gaston was able to reform the political part of the monarchy to form a Constitutional Monarchy with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain, which over numerous kings has seen power devolved to the people.

Gaston was deeply saddened when he heard that his brother had choked upon his own spittle and presided over a funeral fit for his brother.

With the crown now on 38 year old, King Gaston, many expected for the constitution to be altered to fit him, however Gaston explained that “the office of government is for the people to decide, I will work with the government to assist in the interior politics of France but I believe I am better suited concentrating on religious matters and foreign affairs.”

In 1814, Gaston saw his country hold its first election, with property owning men vote for their Chancellor, as well as county representatives. This election saw retired General, Jean-de-Dieu Soult, elected Chancellor and leading a traditionalist nationalist party to the majority.

While political harmony was being felt in the West, the rest of European, were seeing unrest and revolts as more and more citizens were calling for Revolution,

This resulted in an Austrian monarchist, Johann Georg Hiedler, aged 30, assassinating the 45 year old King, as he rode in his open carriage, while screaming “I killed one king to save a hundred others”



(10) Pierre was the eldest child of Gaston I and his wife, and was taught from early in his life, that the ideal monarch was a figurehead as opposed to a russian style autocrat, and did his best to fulfil this statement. Before He took the throne, as a young man, he would attempt to bring a number of Parisian prostitutes into the palace, and when the King did find out, he took a horsecrop to his son, reminding his son of his duties and of the Press.

When his father died, and Pierre, Dauphin of France became Pierre II, King of France, France was entering a truly golden age, with her empire spanning the globe and nearly half of all humanity speaking French. At the age of 23, Pierre would marry Euphemia of the Netherlands, and the pair would have three children; two sons and a Daughter. It would be in 1824, when Pierre would negotiate for his younger brother; Charles, Duke of Orleans to marry the heiress of Cosimo V, Grand Duke of Tuscany and with the death of Cosimo in 1830, Charles and his wife would be crowned as Grand Duke and Duchess of Tuscany.

The thirty nine year rule of Pierre saw major expansion of the French Empire, particularly in South East Asia, and it would be in 1859 that Pierre II would pass and the throne of France would pass to his son, Guillaume.




(11) Guillaume was born in 1835, during the reign of his father, named after his maternal grandfather, William of the Netherlands. He was the second son, created Duke of Orleans at birth, and married to Princess Militza of Montenegro, a distant cousin through the Bourbon-Soissons line, of the House of Petrović-Njegoš. They were married in 1855, and by the time of both his elder brother and father's death four years later, had produced only a daughter, Vjera.

In the time since the likely union of France and Navarre almost three centuries earlier, Navarre had flourished under the House of Albert. Despite the impact of the War of the Spanish Infantas, Navarre enjoyed a happy trading partnership with their neighbours, both France and English Spain.

However, through a fluke of marriage and succession, Navarre became part of the United Kingdom of Portugal (alongside Brazil, the Algarve and Portuguese Spain) which put England and France in the peculiar position that they effectively controlled access to Navarre by both land and sea. And they took advantage of this, essentially holding the tiny nation hostage in order to acquire preferential trade partnerships.

Guillaume went to lengths to stress behind closed doors that this was the will of the Parliament Francis, the newer bicameral version rather than the older version established by Henry V, now known as the Parliament de L'Ancien Regime, filled with members of the nobility.

Guillaume only ruled for 20 years, but continued the expansion into South East Asia, renaming Timor in honour of his wife on their twentieth wedding anniversary. He would die a few years later of a stroke, to be succeeded by his Cousin; Lèopold, Duke of Anjou.



(12) At the death of Guillaume I, the throne would pass to another grandson of Gaston I; the Duke of Anjou. Born in 1839 and baptised as Lèopold Stanislas Phillipe of Anjou, there was little chance of him ever receiving the throne of France, apart from a series of events; firstly Guillaume of France only produced a daughter, and then the declaration of 1843 came, in which Carlo I of Tuscany and his descendents forfeited their right to the French Throne as forced by the Parliament of Tuscany in order to retain their throne, and lastly the death of his elder brother in 1870 not only made Lèopold the duke of Anjou, but unannounced heir to the throne of France. Lèopold had married his distant cousin in 1860, and by the time of being made Duke, had 5 children, with his eldest son; _________, becoming Dauphin of France.

during the 1880s, The French Empire was eclipsed industrially and militarily by the newly formed German Empire; a colossal industrial power stretching from the Adriatic to the North and Baltic seas. The French parliament was gripped by fear of invasion, and in an attempt to assuage fears, began a wholesale military expansion, so much so that by 1893, the military was some three times the size of was a decade earlier. The King was present at many parades in this period, as a symbol of nationalism and pride in the French Empire.

In 1897, the King would fall from his horse at one such parade, and dragged across the sand of the parade ground, and would pass a week later, succeeded by Henry.



(13) Henry VI was planned from birth to marry Vjera of France and Montenegro, and this happened when he was 18 and she was 19. The first of three children followed shortly after.

Whilst Germany had become a military colossus during his father's reign, the realisation dawned that a cadet branch of the House of Bourbon, the House of Soissons, now occupied the thrones of Portugal (and thus Navarre, the problem of which remained unsolved), England, the Netherlands and Italy. This meant that France was surrounded, and despite the occasional marriage between the main Soissons line and the Bourbon-Conde one, the House of Soissons was far enough removed that no real loyalty existed between them.

The senior most Soissons was 27th in line to the French throne, after the lines of the Dukes of Normandy and Chartres who had four sons each. Still, the German Kaiser forced the hand of the Parliament Francais and Henry by forcing them to sign a law that removed the male line of Charles, Count of Soissons, from the line of succession. Despite the fact that the current Duke was unlikely to ascend to the French throne, this still caused some diplomatic problems with the various monarchs descended from the Count making land grabs to German and French colonial assets.

This meant that the French Navy was deployed to protect those assets, leading to conflicts, led in South East Asia by the Soissons Powers by James, Duke of Porto. This culminates in the Battle of Kowloon, in which the German vessel Ingelfingen sank the Portuguese ship, Queen Victoria.

By the time news of this reached Paris, Henry was dead, leaving the whole mess for his successor, Gaston , his oldest child to steer France through.

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(14) Gaston was born in 1877 before his grandfather became King, but after it was clear he was next inline, making Gaston at his birth third inline behind his father and grandfather, so he was raised to someday be King. Early in his life the German Empire was an antagonist of France as the two powerful nations armed themselves against each other and pursed colonial Empires as rivals.

The old Holy Roman Empire had been dissolved when the electors in 1848 had failed to agree on a new Emperor, with a split between Wilhelm Hohenzoller, the King of Prussia and the heir of the just passed Joseph Michael Hapsburg of Austria through his mother Maria of Hapsburg, and a third cousin, Grigori Kovács, descended from the Hapsburg through his grandmother, an aunt of Joseph Michael. The result was the two new Empires, the German and the Hungarian, which had the eastern regions that had been part of the Hapsburg realm.

It was the next German Kaiser, Wilhem I's son, Frederick I, that was the Emperor of the rising German Empire during Gaston's youth. By the time Gaston's father was King, France had forged a wary truce with Germany as the two recognized their various colonial holdings. This was cemented with two marriages as Gaston's sister, the Princess Louisa, in 1900 married the Kaiser's heir, Prince Frederick, who beame Kaiser Frederick II in 1905, and the Dauphin Gaston married the Kaiser's daughter, Camila, in 1901. It was Frederick II who impacted the French to disinherit the Soissons cadet branch.

Added to the alliance between France and Germany was the other rival of Germany's enemy Hungary, the Ottoman Empire. This resulted in Hungary's ally and Germany's main enemy to the East, the Russian Empire, to ally with Hungary, Portugal, England, and Italy.

As Gaston took the throne, it was hoped that the conflict in Asia would remain a limited colonial war. But that was not to be when Hungarian forces marched on Vienna, the secondary capital of the German Empire.

As the war was fought not only on four fronts in Europe, but throughout the colonial empires in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific, this was called the War of the Global Empires or the Imperial War. (Later the First Imperial War.)

At home the main fighting for the French was the northern front with the English who were allied with Holland and the southern front with Portugal. Sporadic fighting took place on the Italian frontier, but the Alps limited the fighting and Italy focused on fighting the Germans to the east.

It was a terrible war unlike any before as the new machine guns made the land combat become trench warfare that turned into a stalemate. At sea the fighting was in giant coal driven iron clad battleships and submarines. Meanwhile airships dropped bombs and, as the war continued, more and more machine gun armed Aeroplanes fought each other in dog fights as they escorted or attacked the fleet of bomber airships. This meant that cities behind the lines were bombed.

Millions of the French died in the war, an entire generation of young men decimated. As the stalemate turned from months into years in Europe, the battles in the colonial empires went back and forth. In 1917 Japan joined the French alliance and Russia now had a two front war. Then the Chinese Empire joined on the side of Russia and invaded Indochina.

But the worst part was the spread of disease. In late 1918 a new Influenza known as the Portugueese Flu, swept like a plague through the Continent. In January of 1920, without any end of the stalemate in Europe in sight and the colonial fortunes of the French alliance not going well, the King contracted the virus and died.


The House of Bourbon-Conde

Charles de Bourbon, Duke of Vendome, b. 1489, d. 1537
a) Antoine, King of Navarre, b. 1518, r. 1537 to 1562​
1) Henri III, King of Navarre, b. 1553, r. 1572 to 1589​
2) Catherine II, Queen of Navarre, b. 1559, r. 1589 to 1604​
b) Louis, Prince of Conde, b. 1530, d. 1569​
1) Henri I, Prince of Conde, b. 1552, d. 1588​
a) Henry IV of France, b. 1588, r. 1589 to 1646, m. Elizabeth Stuart (1596 to 1662)​
2) Francois, Prince of Conti, b. 1558, d. 1614​
3) Charles, Count of Soissons, b. 1566, d. 1612​
a) Louis, Count/Duke of Soissons, b. 1604, d. 1641​
1) line continues


Henry IV of France, b. 1588, r. 1589 to 1646, m. Elizabeth Stuart (1596 to 1662)
1) Henry, Dauphin of France, b. 1616, d. 1643​
a) Henry V of France, prev. Duke of Burgundy, b. 1640, r 1646 to 1655, then 1655 to 1678, m. Jeanne of Savoy (1645 to 1703)​
1) Jeanne of France, Madame Royale, b. 1664​
2) Francis III of France b. 1665, r. 1678 to 1722 m. 168, Anne of England (1665–1714)​
b) Jeanne b. 1685 D.1711, m. Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou​
c) Anne b. 1686​
g) Francis, Dauphin of France, b. 1689, d. 1705​
h) Maria b. 1690​
i) Pierre I of France, prev. Duke of Normandy, b. 1692, r. 1722 to 1747, m. 1710, Magdalena of Soissons (1690 to 1760)​
1) Pierre, Dauphin of France b.1712 d.1719​
2) Louis, Duke of Normandy b.1712 d.1719​
3) Charles, Dauphin of France b.1715 d.1731​
4) Jeanne of France b.1713 d.1762​
5) Isabeau of France b. 1714 d.1781​
3) Christine of France​
2) Rene I of France, prev. Duke of Vendome, b. 1618, r. 1655​
3) Francis, Duke of Orleans, b. 1621, Regent 1655 to 1658, then 1678 to 1683, d. 1705 m. Henrietta of England (1644–1670)​
a) Francis II, Duke of Orleans, b. 1665, d. 1723​
1) Jean Robert, Duke of Orleans, Premiere Prince Du Sang, b. 1690 d.1742​
4) Robert, Duke of Anjou b. 1624 d.1690, m. Marie-Alexandrine de Cröy​
a) Louis-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1650 d.1698, m. Karolina Wisnowiecki, Princess of Poland​
1) Louis-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1650 d.1698, m. Karolina Wisnowiecki, Princess of Poland​
a) Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1681 d.1740, m. Jeanne of France​
1) Phillipe VII, King of France (also Premiere Prince Du Sang 1742 to 1747) b. 1710, r. 1747 to 1764, m. Claudia of Savoy​
5) Charles, Duke of Berry b. 1625, d. 1687, m. Claire Clémence de Maillé (1628-1694)​
a) several generations
a) Gaston, 5th Duke of Berry, b. 1710, d. 1790, Premiere Prince du Sang 1760 to 1790, m. Yolande of Beja (1712 to 1772)​
1) Gaston b. 1735, d. 1755​
2) Isabeau of Berry, b. 1743, m. Jean III, King of France​
3) Antoine, 6th Duke of Berry, b. 1745, D.1810, Premiere Prince Du Sang 1790 to 1810​

Phillipe VII, King of France (also Premiere Prince Du Sang 1742 to 1747) b. 1710, r. 1747 to 1764, m. Claudia of Savoy
1l Phillipe, Dauphin of France, b. 1740, d. 1750​
2) Jean III, King of France, b. 1742, r. 1764 to 1800, m. Isabeau of Berry (1743 to 1810)​
a) Phillipe, Daupin of France, b.1762 d.1769​
b) Magdalene of France, b.1765​
c) Phillipotte of France, b.1767​
d) Sophia of France, b.1770​
e) Phillipe VIII, King of France, b.1772, r. 1800 to.1813, unmarried​
f) Gaston I, King of France, b.1775, regent 1800 to 1813, r.1813 to 1820, m. Princess Charlotte of the United Kingdom b.1781 d.1856​
1) Pierre II, King of France b. 1802, r.1820 to 1859, m. Princess Euphemia of the Netherlands b.1810 d.1871​
a) Pierre, Dauphin of France, b. 1830, d. 1858​
b) Guillaume I, King of France, prev. Duke of Orleans, b. 1835, r. 1859 to 1879, m Militzia of Montenegro​
1) Vjera of France & Montenegro, b. 1857​
c) Euphemia, Madame Royale, b. 1836, d. 1920, never married​
2) Carlo, Grand Duke of Tuscany b.1805 D.1872, m. Clementine d'Medici, Grand Duchess of Tuscany b.1802 D.1870​
a) line of Bourbon-Tuscany​
3) Henri, Duke of Anjou b.1807 D.1854, m. Teresa, Princess Wisnowiecki b.1810 D.1880​
a) Amèdèè, Duke of Anjou, b.1836 D.1870, never married.​
b) Lèopold I, King of France, previously Duke of Anjou, b. 1839 d.1897, m. Louise of Soissons b.1840 d.1906​
1) Henry VI, King of France, b. 1858, r. 1897 to 1913, m. Vjera of France and Montenegro (1857 to 1935)​
--a) Gaston II, King of France, b.1877, r. 1913-1920, m. Princess Camila Hohenzollern of Berlin (1883 to 1962)
--b) Princess Louisa, b. 1881, d. 1919, m. Kaiser Frederick II Hohenzollern (1875. r. 1905-1933)
--c) Lèopold b. 1886. d. 1895.​
2) 4 other children​
4) Gaston, Duke of Normandy​
a) 4 sons, 6 grandsons​
5) Jean, Duke of Chartres​
a) 4 sons, 10 grandsons​
3) Juliette of France, B.1743​
4) Charles, Duke of Orleans, b.1744 d.1750​
5) Claudia of France, b. 1745​
6) Caroline of France, b. 1745​
 
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Starting a second list;
What if Duarte, Duke of Guimarães didn't die?

Kings of Portugal and the Algarve;
Henrique I, r. 1578 to 1580 (House of Avis)
Duarte II, r. 1580 to 1598 (House of Avis) [1]




[1] With the Death of the Cardinal-King in 1580, the.successor was without a doubt; the Last Avis; Duarte, Duke of Guimarães. Born posthumously in 1541, Duarte had many men in front of him in the line of succession, but with the death of king Sebastian in 1578 left just the Cardinal-Infante and Duarte himself.

During his uncle's reign, the marriage between Duarte and Lady Mary Grey, a great-Grandchild of Henry VII of England, occurred. Rumours abounded that Elizabeth I of England suggested the marriage herself. The marriage was struck with the condition that Mary forfeit all claim for the English throne. The marriage was fruitful, with their first child, a Daughter, born in 1579 and a further five children over the next decade. While bringing some discontent due to her Protestantism, upon her arrival in Portugal, she did convert, and those upset were appeased.

The Portuguese Empire under Duarte II was said to be a merchants paradise,.with spices from India, Africa, and Brazil available in every Portuguese port. Duarte II would pass in 1598, and the throne would pass to __________.
 
Starting a second list;
What if Duarte, Duke of Guimarães didn't die?

Kings of Portugal and the Algarve;
Henrique I, r. 1578 to 1580 (House of Avis)
Duarte II, r. 1580 to 1598 (House of Avis) [1]




[1] With the Death of the Cardinal-King in 1580, the.successor was without a doubt; the Last Avis; Duarte, Duke of Guimarães. Born posthumously in 1541, Duarte had many men in front of him in the line of succession, but with the death of king Sebastian in 1578 left just the Cardinal-Infante and Duarte himself.

During his uncle's reign, the marriage between Duarte and Lady Mary Grey, a great-Grandchild of Henry VII of England, occurred. Rumours abounded that Elizabeth I of England suggested the marriage herself. The marriage was struck with the condition that Mary forfeit all claim for the English throne. The marriage was fruitful, with their first child, a Daughter, born in 1579 and a further five children over the next decade. While bringing some discontent due to her Protestantism, upon her arrival in Portugal, she did convert, and those upset were appeased.

The Portuguese Empire under Duarte II was said to be a merchants paradise,.with spices from India, Africa, and Brazil available in every Portuguese port. Duarte II would pass in 1598, and the throne would pass to __________.
Looks unreadable bro.
Might wanna change the font color to black.....
 
As the war was fought not only on four fronts in Europe, but throughout the colonial empires in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific, this was called the War of the Global Empires or the Imperial War. (Later the First Imperial War.)
Note, I just added in "the Americas" because I forgot France still has possession in the Americas.
 
I don't like dark mode.

If you, like me, want to stay in gray, just highlight the text like you're going to copy it or quote it, and there it is, easy to read.
 
I have an idea of a throwaway idea I want to put into my next French King, but it needs to be put into the sixties, so fingers crossed 🤞
 
Kings of France
Henry III, r. 1574 to 1589 (House of Valois-Angouleme)
Henry IV, r. 1589 to 1646 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (1)
Henry V, r. 1647 to 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Rene "The Usurper", r. (1646 to) 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (2)
Henry V, r. 1655 to 1678 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Francis III, r. 1678 to 1722 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (4)
Pierre I, r. 1722 to 1747 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (5)
Phillipe VII, r. 1747 to 1764 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (6)
Jean III, r. 1764 to 1800 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (7)
Phillipe VIII, r. 1800 to 1813 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (8)
Gaston I regent 1800 to 1813, r. 1813 to 1820 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (9)
Pierre II, r.1820 to 1859 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (10)
Guillaume I, r. 1859 to 1879
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (11)
Lèopold I, r.1879 to 1897
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (12)
Henry VI, r. 1897 to 1913 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (13)
Gaston II, r. 1913 to 1920 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (14)
Henry VII r.1920 to 1921 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (15)
(1)
After the death of the King of Navarre, Henry IV became heir to the throne of France (Henry III having disinherited the Archbishop of Rouen upon the death of the King of Navarre, the Archbishop would die shortly after, before any attempt to oust the child King could be formulated) at the age of one whilst the throne of Navarre passed to Henry of Navarre's sister, Catherine II. Catherine II would die in 1604, to be succeeded by Henri de Rohan as Henri IV of Navarre, until 1638.

Henry IV of France would marry Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of James VI and I of England in 1613 when she was 17 and Henry was 25. The couple would have 13 children from 1614 to 1632, out of which 8 were boys. Only 4 of these children predeceased their father (compared to 6 who predeceased their mother). Despite his father and cousin having been lead Huegenot figures, Pope Clement insisted that the young King be raised as a devout Roman Catholic which avoided the War of Religion that had been threatened when Henry III of Navarre had been heir.

Until 1614 (for 24 years), the Premiere Prince Du Sang was the Kings uncle, the Prince of Conti (who also acted as Regent until 1606), and subsequently his ten year old cousin, Louis. Henry would later raise the countship to a dukedom upon Louis' marriage.

Henry would die in 1646 in Paris, surrounded by his children and grandchildren, to be succeeded by his son , Rene I

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(2) Rene was never meant to be King. As the legitimate heir, his nephew was still to young to rule Rene was named Regent until His Highness could ascend to the throne. However Rene abused his position to make himself the real power behind the throne ruling in all but name. His rule was fraught with challenges from backers of the heir who grew into a seemingly promising ruler, yet was continuously shut out of decision making by Rene. As a devoted Catholic Rene encouraged repression against the French Huguenots which led to the bloody Nevers Revolt in 1652. While the revolt was ultimately destroyed the Regents authority was shaken and he had to rely increasingly on various local landowners to shore up support giving them large concessions. These concessions, known to history as the Renian Concessions, would haunt his successors. In 1655 Rene would finally outmaneuver the Heir's supporters in court and force him to flee to Savoy. He was crowned King Rene I of France soon after to little fanfare and much anger among the nobility. When offers of increased privileges didn't satisfy their anger Rene resorted to military action. The resulting years of intermittent conflict saw the balance of power see-saw between the King and the nobility who largely supported the legitimate heir. In the end however Rene, never the master military strategist was killed in battle during the Battle of Calais. The crown was left to his nephew, Henry

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(3) Henry V reign had effectively begun in 1646 with the death of his grandfather, following the death of his father, Le Grand Dauphin, three years earlier. Aged only 6 at the point of his succession, his uncle, the Duke of Vendome, had taken control of court, sideload Henry and eventually taken the throne himself. In 1655, with the young King nearly of age, he fled to Savoy where he regrouped with the Duke of Soissons, and two of his other uncles, the Dukes of Orleans and Anjou, and marshalled an army that defeated the royal forces of Rene The Usurper. By Christmas of 1655, Henry V had regained his rightful place on the throne and was recrowned in a ceremony witnessed by all three of his surviving uncles, including the Duke of Orleans who had been made Regent for the next 3 year's until Henry reached 18.

He would subsequently marry Jeanne of Savoy in 1663, daughter of Philibert, Duke of Savoy, to further cement the friendship and alliance after sheltering him in 1655. The marriage would not be as fruitful as that of his grandfather, providing only three children, of whom two were daughters, named Jeanne and Christine.

After the Reneian Concessions had fielded power to the local landowners, much of Henry's reign was spent attempting to appease them. Whilst Henry V was not an adherent to the concept of the divine right of kings, having been somewhat humbled in the fight for his crown, he did believe that a strong centralised seat of government was the best option for France. Therefore, Henry considered the creation of a Parliament Francais, inspired by the English model of his Stuart relations, was the avenue to explore. Thus the remains of his reign were spent ingratiating himself with the nobility that would sit within the Parliament, and the composition would impact numerous national military and agricultural decisions that were made from 1670 to 1678.

Jeanne, Madame Royale, his eldest child, would only be 14 when her father passed away in 1678 of a heart attack. This meant that the throne passed to Dauphin Francis, his 12 year old son.

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(4) Francis III was born on 4th October 1665, Feast of St Francis of Assisi, being named in honour of the saint and his great-uncle Francis, Duke of Orleans, who was also his god father, along with King Charles II of England. His god mothers were Henrietta, Duchess of Orléans (Wife of Francis and sister of Charles II) and Mariana of Austria, Queen Regent of Spain (to support a special relationship between Spain and Holy Roman Empire)

The first 12 years of Francis’s life was happy with his parents being very involved with their children’s upbringings. He was initially under the care of royal governesses, among them being Claire, Duchess of Berry and Maria, wife ofMarshal Jean d'Estrées, Count of Estrées (1624–1707).

When Francis reached the age of seven, he was removed from the care of women and placed in the society of men. He received Francis, Duke of Orleans as his governor and was tutored by Hardouin de Péréfixe de Beaumont, Archbishop of Paris.

It was during a tutorial about French history, that Dauphin Francis received the news of his future, with his father dying of a heart attack.

Francis, Duke of Orleans, quickly transported his great-nephew to Reims Cathedral, where Charles-Maurice Le Tellier, Archbishop of Reims, crowned the 12 year old king, with 57 year old Duke, declared himself regent for the second time, but starting the new tradition of declaring his support to the king, kneeling in front of his king saying:
I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the King of France against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the Kingthat I take this obligation freely. So help me God.

For the next five years, known commonly as the “Reign of two Francises” the elder Francis would include the younger on all political matters, teaching the way of ruling as they went along.

During his sixteenth birthday, a grand party was held, in his honour. The party was also used as a match making, with nobilities of all ranks, from Viscomte to Emperors, such as Maria Antonia of Austria, daughter of Emperor Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor, Anne Marie d'Orléans, a cousin as the daughter of Francis, Duke of Orléans and of Henrietta of England.

His eyes through the night were drawn to an unlikely match, King Charles II of England had relished in being invited to a party bringing along with him, his niece, Her Highness The Lady Anne of York, second daughter of the Duke of York, and his first wife, Anne Hyde.

King Charles II was over the moon that his niece was picked as a bride for the King of France. The wedding was planned for two years later when both bride and groom turned 18, allowing the wedding to coinciding with his full coronation.

The pair were happily married, however their marriage was plagued by miscarriages and stillborns, with only 5 of the 17 pregnancies seeing the babies born healthy, it is said Francis’s love grew for his wife with each pregnancy and he shared her grief, pushing away all attempts at mistresses coming on to him.

On 6 February 1685, Charles II died without legitimate issue, leading to Anne’s father, James to inherited the thrones of England, Ireland and Scotland.
On 10 June 1688, James saw the birth of a son and heir, Prince James Francis Edward, with Francis being his middle namesake as well as his brother-in-law’s Godfather.
French spies in England, found evidence that some members of the English court were trying to take away the Divine Right of Prince James of Wales, and invite his older sister, Anglican Mary and her Protestant husband, William of Orange.

In response, Francis requested the French navy to keep an eye on the Dutch port of Hellevoetsluis, by early October, news of nearly 500 ships being organised reached France and so the great Battle of the English Channel began with Anglo-French navy defeating the Dutch fleet, killing William of Orange.

This next eight years, saw a new religious war engulf Europe, between Catholics and Protestants. The alliance between France and England grew with Francis and his father-in-law, arranging a trade agreement between the neighbouring nations, assisting each other in putting down Protestant protest as well as blockading thechannel from enemy nations.

In 1701, when news of King James II’s death reached France, Francis was publicly more affected than his wife, the daughter. Francis and Anne attended the coronation of her brother King James III.

For the last 21 years of his reign Francis saw the expansion of land in the colonies including Nova Frankia (OT Louisiana) assist his country’s economy.
However is death at the age of 57, came following a sickness he hid from the public, many modern doctors to be cancer, with a dramatic weight loss being the hardest to hide. He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son.



His majesty Francois III reviewing the artillery upon the field of Versailles, 1686.

~~~~~~~~~~
(5) Pierre had been Duke of Normandy at birth whilst his elder brother Francis had been Dauphin. Francis had died in a horse riding accident at 16, celebrating the fact that his bride was on the way to Paris. This meant that 13 year old Pierre was now Dauphin, his brothers betrothal to Magdalena of Soissons, daughter of the Premiere Prince Du Sang, now hinged upon him. Magdalena was 15, only two years older so the pair were not officially married until 1710. They reportedly had a happy marriage and produced several children children who survived infancy.

A big change in France occurred only one year after Pierre had ascended the throne. The Premiere Prince Du Sang, a role which had been held by his wife's family for about 130 years, held by the senior most male line descendant of a monarch who wasn't a son or grandson, shifted to the Dukes of Orleans. Francois of Orleans (son of Henry IV) had been incredibly long lived, but in 1723 his own grandson, Jean Robert, had become Duke and Premiere Prince Du Sang. This meant that any influence the Dukes of Soissons had hoped to wield through the marriage of the Queen and their role had largely evaporated.

Shortly after this transfer of position, Europe fell into the War of the Spanish Infantas. Charles III of Spain (son of Charles II and Maria Anna of Neuberg) died childless after his wife died in childbirth with their son.

Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire was the male line heir to Spain, but this would increase the Habsburg domains and influence of the HRE to a worrying level. And nobody wanted that.

But the Spanish crown could pass through a female line, and both of Charles III's sisters had male heirs - the eldest Mariana (after her grandmother) was married to James III of England and Scotland which meant that James, the Prince of Wales, was the rightful heir.

However, Louise was the wife of the Duke of Beja, brother of Joao V, King of Portugal, and she pushed for her own son as a compromise candidate to become King of Spain.

And nobody wanted either of those either. Hostilities would continue for a decade, with France backing the English candidate (Pierre and James were cousins, after all), the Holy Roman Empire pushing the Emperor and Portugal pulling together a coalition of minor nations, alongside the Russians.

In the end, the Treaty of the Hague saw Spain partitioned, with the north handed to England, and the south handed to Portugal. Nobody particularly liked it, but a decade of war had made Europe weary of the succession.

The remaining ten years of Pierres reign were peaceful, and the King died in 1747 with his wife at his side, she would survive him by 13 years, seeing his nephew, Phillipe, Duke of Anjou become King of France.



Pierre of France, exhibiting his skill at sculpting, 1746.

~~~~~~~~~~

(6) The final years of Pierre's reign, albeit peaceful, were full of heartache as the House of Bourbon suffered losses. From Orleans to the surviving sons of the King, it ended with the succession pointing at Stanislas-Phillipe, Duke of Anjou. The Bourbon-Anjou began with Robert, Duke of Anjou who after his marriage into the Cröy inherited the county of Fontenoy within the Imperial Duchy of Lorraine in 1645, and so as an Imperial Prince sought to make his own glory. His son; Louis-Jean, would eventually become a general of great renown, firstly serving his cousins in France, and then moving on to serve the Imperial armies in the early 1680s, the Kings of Spain later that decade, and lastly the Polish King; Jakob I Wisnowiecki, and became such a fixture of the polish court, he would marry the eldest daughter of the King; Karolina of Poland, with his son being born a full year after their wedding. That son; Stanislas-Jean, was even considered a candidate for the Polish throne in 1696 as the eldest grandson of Jakob I, but lost to his maternal cousin; Wilhelm of Teschen. Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou would return to France in 1708, bringing the so-called "Angevin Treasure" with him. A year later, he would marry the daughter of his majesty; Francis III, giving the king a grandson; Stanislas-Phillipe of Anjou.

Inheriting the throne of France at the age of 37, Stanislas-Phillipe chose the regal name of Phillipe VII for himself, and would continue his uncle's policies of Peace and the endearing will to protect that Peace. Remarkably little would threaten that Peace aside from the war of the Polish succession, where France would support the Kings cousin; Zygmunt, Prince Wisnowiecki, the grandson of Jakob I of Poland, as opposed to Frederick of Hohenzollern, elected by rebel members of the Sejm.

Phillipe VII would pass after a stroke in 1764, and the French throne would pass to Jean III.


Phillipe VII in Hunting clothes, 1748.

~~~~~~~~~~


(7) Jean was the second son of Phillipe VII, born Duke of Normandy, becoming Dauphin upon the death of his elder brother in 1750. After the Orleans line had been cut short, Phillipe VII had briefly been First Prince of the Blood, but upon his coronation that became the duty of the Dukes of Berry.

The male line of the Duke of Berry extended back to the youngest son of Henry IV, Charles. The Duke for much of Jean III's reign was Gaston, 5th Duke of Orleans, great great grandson of Charles. Gaston had married Yolande of Beja, daughter of the then present Duke of Beja, who also acted as Governor of Portuguese Spain.

When it came to the question of who Jean might marry, that question was answered with Gaston's daughter, Isabeau of Berry, only a year younger than the Dauphin. They married in 1761 and by the time of Jean becoming King of France, they already had a son and a daughter, and would go on to have four more children.

The continued "Age of Anjou" saw the relative peace of his father's reign continue into Jean's. Of course, there were minor skirmishes and a few colonies swapped hands in compensation or as countries needed funds. But nothing escalated to the level of the War of the Spanish Infantas, or the Battle of the Channel. Even difficulties with the colonies in Nueva Frankia were minimal, with the territories under the day to day supervsion of the Duke of Soissons as Viceroy.

This would continue to 1800 when Jean died after a bridge he was riding over collapsed and he fell into a freezing river. Although he survived, he would later die of hypothermia and be succeeded by his eldest son; Phillipe, Dauphin of France.
~~~~~~~~~~




(8) The Eldest of the two surviving sons of Jean III, and named for his decade older sibling; Phillippe, Dauphin of France, Phillipe inherited throne at the age of twenty eight, and despite his years, is said to have remained a child throughout. Obsessed by the French army, Phillipe VIII would often gather two or three regiments in Parade purely for his own amusement, and delight in their uniforms and drill.

Plagued by a lack of Mental capability, it could be said that Phillipe VIII was the best king for the times, as it was the unofficial Regency council, headed by the Kings brother that slowly ushered in the Constitutional Monarchy of France, with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain.

A.sidenote of Phillipes reign would be the death of Antoine, Duke of Berry and thus the extinction of the other lines of the house of Bourbon, aside from the Conti and the Bourbon-Soissons.

At the age of 40, the now powerless King would pass, and it was determined that the king had choked upon his own spittle, and was succeeded by his brother; Gaston

View attachment 589537
(9)
His eldest brother Phillipe, Dauphin of France, died aged 9, after a severe seizure, caused him to bite his tongue and bleed to death.

Without a male heir, Jean III was desperate for a son, a second son also called Phillipe was born 1772 and Gaston was born in 1775, the last child of Isabeau of Berry and named after her father, Gaston of Berry. Unlike any of his older siblings, he was born with no physical or mental disability.

While his older brother was not expected to last long, Gaston was raised and tutored in the way of running the State.

Gaston was 25 when his father died and some nobility, wished for him to claim the throne over his older brother, however Gaston believed that God had seen fit to keep Phillipe alive, only he will sit on the throne as king, while Gaston acted as his unofficial Head of Regency council.

No marriages were arranged for Phillipe as he never called for a female companion, preferring to watch soldiers parade.
As the heir to his brother Gaston was seen as the most eligible bachelor in Europe, he married in 1802, Charlotte, Princess Royal of Britain, the British isles becoming a United Kingdom under the reign of her father, Charles V.
As regent to his brother, Gaston found that trying to keep all the power under the rule of a single person, was time consuming and lead to unpopular actions being blamed solely on that person.

Over the 13 years as regent, Gaston was able to reform the political part of the monarchy to form a Constitutional Monarchy with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain, which over numerous kings has seen power devolved to the people.

Gaston was deeply saddened when he heard that his brother had choked upon his own spittle and presided over a funeral fit for his brother.

With the crown now on 38 year old, King Gaston, many expected for the constitution to be altered to fit him, however Gaston explained that “the office of government is for the people to decide, I will work with the government to assist in the interior politics of France but I believe I am better suited concentrating on religious matters and foreign affairs.”

In 1814, Gaston saw his country hold its first election, with property owning men vote for their Chancellor, as well as county representatives. This election saw retired General, Jean-de-Dieu Soult, elected Chancellor and leading a traditionalist nationalist party to the majority.

While political harmony was being felt in the West, the rest of European, were seeing unrest and revolts as more and more citizens were calling for Revolution,

This resulted in an Austrian monarchist, Johann Georg Hiedler, aged 30, assassinating the 45 year old King, as he rode in his open carriage, while screaming “I killed one king to save a hundred others”



(10) Pierre was the eldest child of Gaston I and his wife, and was taught from early in his life, that the ideal monarch was a figurehead as opposed to a russian style autocrat, and did his best to fulfil this statement. Before He took the throne, as a young man, he would attempt to bring a number of Parisian prostitutes into the palace, and when the King did find out, he took a horsecrop to his son, reminding his son of his duties and of the Press.

When his father died, and Pierre, Dauphin of France became Pierre II, King of France, France was entering a truly golden age, with her empire spanning the globe and nearly half of all humanity speaking French. At the age of 23, Pierre would marry Euphemia of the Netherlands, and the pair would have three children; two sons and a Daughter. It would be in 1824, when Pierre would negotiate for his younger brother; Charles, Duke of Orleans to marry the heiress of Cosimo V, Grand Duke of Tuscany and with the death of Cosimo in 1830, Charles and his wife would be crowned as Grand Duke and Duchess of Tuscany.

The thirty nine year rule of Pierre saw major expansion of the French Empire, particularly in South East Asia, and it would be in 1859 that Pierre II would pass and the throne of France would pass to his son, Guillaume.





(11) Guillaume was born in 1835, during the reign of his father, named after his maternal grandfather, William of the Netherlands. He was the second son, created Duke of Orleans at birth, and married to Princess Militza of Montenegro, a distant cousin through the Bourbon-Soissons line, of the House of Petrović-Njegoš. They were married in 1855, and by the time of both his elder brother and father's death four years later, had produced only a daughter, Vjera.

In the time since the likely union of France and Navarre almost three centuries earlier, Navarre had flourished under the House of Albert. Despite the impact of the War of the Spanish Infantas, Navarre enjoyed a happy trading partnership with their neighbours, both France and English Spain.

However, through a fluke of marriage and succession, Navarre became part of the United Kingdom of Portugal (alongside Brazil, the Algarve and Portuguese Spain) which put England and France in the peculiar position that they effectively controlled access to Navarre by both land and sea. And they took advantage of this, essentially holding the tiny nation hostage in order to acquire preferential trade partnerships.

Guillaume went to lengths to stress behind closed doors that this was the will of the Parliament Francis, the newer bicameral version rather than the older version established by Henry V, now known as the Parliament de L'Ancien Regime, filled with members of the nobility.

Guillaume only ruled for 20 years, but continued the expansion into South East Asia, renaming Timor in honour of his wife on their twentieth wedding anniversary. He would die a few years later of a stroke, to be succeeded by his Cousin; Lèopold, Duke of Anjou.




(12) At the death of Guillaume I, the throne would pass to another grandson of Gaston I; the Duke of Anjou. Born in 1839 and baptised as Lèopold Stanislas Phillipe of Anjou, there was little chance of him ever receiving the throne of France, apart from a series of events; firstly Guillaume of France only produced a daughter, and then the declaration of 1843 came, in which Carlo I of Tuscany and his descendents forfeited their right to the French Throne as forced by the Parliament of Tuscany in order to retain their throne, and lastly the death of his elder brother in 1870 not only made Lèopold the duke of Anjou, but unannounced heir to the throne of France. Lèopold had married his distant cousin in 1860, and by the time of being made Duke, had 5 children, with his eldest son; _________, becoming Dauphin of France.

during the 1880s, The French Empire was eclipsed industrially and militarily by the newly formed German Empire; a colossal industrial power stretching from the Adriatic to the North and Baltic seas. The French parliament was gripped by fear of invasion, and in an attempt to assuage fears, began a wholesale military expansion, so much so that by 1893, the military was some three times the size of was a decade earlier. The King was present at many parades in this period, as a symbol of nationalism and pride in the French Empire.

In 1897, the King would fall from his horse at one such parade, and dragged across the sand of the parade ground, and would pass a week later, succeeded by Henry.



(13) Henry VI was planned from birth to marry Vjera of France and Montenegro, and this happened when he was 18 and she was 19. The first of three children followed shortly after.

Whilst Germany had become a military colossus during his father's reign, the realisation dawned that a cadet branch of the House of Bourbon, the House of Soissons, now occupied the thrones of Portugal (and thus Navarre, the problem of which remained unsolved), England, the Netherlands and Italy. This meant that France was surrounded, and despite the occasional marriage between the main Soissons line and the Bourbon-Conde one, the House of Soissons was far enough removed that no real loyalty existed between them.

The senior most Soissons was 27th in line to the French throne, after the lines of the Dukes of Normandy and Chartres who had four sons each. Still, the German Kaiser forced the hand of the Parliament Francais and Henry by forcing them to sign a law that removed the male line of Charles, Count of Soissons, from the line of succession. Despite the fact that the current Duke was unlikely to ascend to the French throne, this still caused some diplomatic problems with the various monarchs descended from the Count making land grabs to German and French colonial assets.

This meant that the French Navy was deployed to protect those assets, leading to conflicts, led in South East Asia by the Soissons Powers by James, Duke of Porto. This culminates in the Battle of Kowloon, in which the German vessel Ingelfingen sank the Portuguese ship, Queen Victoria.

By the time news of this reached Paris, Henry was dead, leaving the whole mess for his successor, Gaston , his oldest child to steer France through.

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(14) Gaston was born in 1877 before his grandfather became King, but after it was clear he was next inline, making Gaston at his birth third inline behind his father and grandfather, so he was raised to someday be King. Early in his life the German Empire was an antagonist of France as the two powerful nations armed themselves against each other and pursed colonial Empires as rivals.

The old Holy Roman Empire had been dissolved when the electors in 1848 had failed to agree on a new Emperor, with a split between Wilhelm Hohenzoller, the King of Prussia and the heir of the just passed Joseph Michael Hapsburg of Austria through his mother Maria of Hapsburg, and a third cousin, Grigori Kovács, descended from the Hapsburg through his grandmother, an aunt of Joseph Michael. The result was the two new Empires, the German and the Hungarian, which had the eastern regions that had been part of the Hapsburg realm.

It was the next German Kaiser, Wilhem I's son, Frederick I, that was the Emperor of the riusing German Empire during Gaston's youth. By the time Gaston's father was King, France had forged a wary truce with Germany as the two recognized their various colonial holdings. This was cemented with two marriages as Gaston's sister, the Princess Louisa, in 1900 married the Kaiser's heir, Prince Frederick, who beame Kaiser Frederick II in 1905, and the Dauphin Gaston married the Kaiser's daughter, Camila, in 1901. It was Frederick II who impacted the French to disinherit the Soissons cadet branch.

Added to the alliance between France and Germany was the other rival of Germany's enemy Hungary, the Ottoman Empire. This resulted in Hungary's ally and Germany's main enemy to the East, the Russian Empire, to ally with Hungary, Portugal, England, and Italy.

As Gaston took the throne, it was hoped that the conflict in Asia would remain a limited colonial war. But that was not to be when Hungarian forces marched on Vienna, the secondary capital of the German Empire.

As the war was fought not only on four fronts in Europe, but throughout the colonial empires in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific, this was called the War of the Global Empires or the Imperial War. (Later the First Imperial War.)

At home the main fighting for the French was the northern front with the English who were allied with Holland and the southern front with Portugal. Sporadic fighting took place on the Italian frontier, but the Alps limited the fighting and Italy focused on fighting the Germans to the east.

It was a terrible war unlike any before as the new machine guns made the land combat become trench warfare that turned into a stalemate. At sea the fighting was in giant coal driven iron clad battleships and submarines. Meanwhile airships dropped bombs and, as the war continued, more and more machine gun armed Aeroplanes fought each other in dog fights as they escorted or attacked the fleet of bomber airships. This meant that cities behind the lines were bombed.

Millions of the French died in the war, an entire generation of young men decimated. As the stalemate turned from months into years in Europe, the battles in the colonial empires went back and forth. In 1917 Japan joined the French alliance and Russia now had a two front war. Then the Chinese Empire joined on the side of Russia and invaded Indochina.

But the worst part was the spread of disease. In late 1918 a new Influenza known as the Portugueese Flu, swept like a plague through the Continent. In January of 1920, without any end of the stalemate in Europe in sight and the colonial fortunes of the French alliance not going well, the King contracted the virus and died.
(15) Born in 1915, Henry VII came to the throne unexpectedly, as his father, the Dauphin, was a healthy man in his early 20s. However, due to the outbreak of the Flu, the Dauphin died a few days before King Gaston II.

Henry VII's reign is one of the shortest reigns in French history, if it can even be called that. It lasted for only one year. King Henry VII died in 1921 aged 6, after only about a month of "reigning" under a regency council headed by his uncle, the Duke of Anjou. He died due to the same influenza that took his father and grandfather.

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Now, idk **** about making a family tree, so basically the Dauphin was the firstborn, and had one kid, Henry VII.
I apologise to @wwbgdiaslt.

Moral: Never trust someone with my work ethic :p
 
Kings of France
Henry III, r. 1574 to 1589 (House of Valois-Angouleme)
Henry IV, r. 1589 to 1646 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (1)

Henry V, r. 1647 to 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Rene "The Usurper", r. (1646 to) 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (2)
Henry V, r. 1655 to 1678 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Francis III, r. 1678 to 1722 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (4)
Pierre I, r. 1722 to 1747 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (5)
Phillipe VII, r. 1747 to 1764 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (6)
Jean III, r. 1764 to 1800 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (7)
Phillipe VIII, r. 1800 to 1813
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (8)
Gaston I regent 1800 to 1813, r. 1813 to 1820 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (9)
Pierre II, r.1820 to 1859 (House of Bourbon-Conde)
(10)
Guillaume I, r. 1859 to 1879
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (11)
Lèopold I, r.1879 to 1897
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (12)
Henry VI, r. 1897 to 1913
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (13)
Gaston II, r. 1913 to 1920
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (14)
Henry VII, r. 1920 to 1921
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (15)
Guillaume II, r. 1921 to 1970
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (16)



(1) After the death of the King of Navarre, Henry IV became heir to the throne of France (Henry III having disinherited the Archbishop of Rouen upon the death of the King of Navarre, the Archbishop would die shortly after, before any attempt to oust the child King could be formulated) at the age of one whilst the throne of Navarre passed to Henry of Navarre's sister, Catherine II. Catherine II would die in 1604, to be succeeded by Henri de Rohan as Henri IV of Navarre, until 1638.

Henry IV of France would marry Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of James VI and I of England in 1613 when she was 17 and Henry was 25. The couple would have 13 children from 1614 to 1632, out of which 8 were boys. Only 4 of these children predeceased their father (compared to 6 who predeceased their mother). Despite his father and cousin having been lead Huegenot figures, Pope Clement insisted that the young King be raised as a devout Roman Catholic which avoided the War of Religion that had been threatened when Henry III of Navarre had been heir.

Until 1614 (for 24 years), the Premiere Prince Du Sang was the Kings uncle, the Prince of Conti (who also acted as Regent until 1606), and subsequently his ten year old cousin, Louis. Henry would later raise the countship to a dukedom upon Louis' marriage.

Henry would die in 1646 in Paris, surrounded by his children and grandchildren, to be succeeded by his son , Rene I

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(2) Rene was never meant to be King. As the legitimate heir, his nephew was still to young to rule Rene was named Regent until His Highness could ascend to the throne. However Rene abused his position to make himself the real power behind the throne ruling in all but name. His rule was fraught with challenges from backers of the heir who grew into a seemingly promising ruler, yet was continuously shut out of decision making by Rene. As a devoted Catholic Rene encouraged repression against the French Huguenots which led to the bloody Nevers Revolt in 1652. While the revolt was ultimately destroyed the Regents authority was shaken and he had to rely increasingly on various local landowners to shore up support giving them large concessions. These concessions, known to history as the Renian Concessions, would haunt his successors. In 1655 Rene would finally outmaneuver the Heir's supporters in court and force him to flee to Savoy. He was crowned King Rene I of France soon after to little fanfare and much anger among the nobility. When offers of increased privileges didn't satisfy their anger Rene resorted to military action. The resulting years of intermittent conflict saw the balance of power see-saw between the King and the nobility who largely supported the legitimate heir. In the end however Rene, never the master military strategist was killed in battle during the Battle of Calais. The crown was left to his nephew, Henry

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(3) Henry V reign had effectively begun in 1646 with the death of his grandfather, following the death of his father, Le Grand Dauphin, three years earlier. Aged only 6 at the point of his succession, his uncle, the Duke of Vendome, had taken control of court, sideload Henry and eventually taken the throne himself. In 1655, with the young King nearly of age, he fled to Savoy where he regrouped with the Duke of Soissons, and two of his other uncles, the Dukes of Orleans and Anjou, and marshalled an army that defeated the royal forces of Rene The Usurper. By Christmas of 1655, Henry V had regained his rightful place on the throne and was recrowned in a ceremony witnessed by all three of his surviving uncles, including the Duke of Orleans who had been made Regent for the next 3 year's until Henry reached 18.

He would subsequently marry Jeanne of Savoy in 1663, daughter of Philibert, Duke of Savoy, to further cement the friendship and alliance after sheltering him in 1655. The marriage would not be as fruitful as that of his grandfather, providing only three children, of whom two were daughters, named Jeanne and Christine.

After the Reneian Concessions had fielded power to the local landowners, much of Henry's reign was spent attempting to appease them. Whilst Henry V was not an adherent to the concept of the divine right of kings, having been somewhat humbled in the fight for his crown, he did believe that a strong centralised seat of government was the best option for France. Therefore, Henry considered the creation of a Parliament Francais, inspired by the English model of his Stuart relations, was the avenue to explore. Thus the remains of his reign were spent ingratiating himself with the nobility that would sit within the Parliament, and the composition would impact numerous national military and agricultural decisions that were made from 1670 to 1678.

Jeanne, Madame Royale, his eldest child, would only be 14 when her father passed away in 1678 of a heart attack. This meant that the throne passed to Dauphin Francis, his 12 year old son.

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(4) Francis III was born on 4th October 1665, Feast of St Francis of Assisi, being named in honour of the saint and his great-uncle Francis, Duke of Orleans, who was also his god father, along with King Charles II of England. His god mothers were Henrietta, Duchess of Orléans (Wife of Francis and sister of Charles II) and Mariana of Austria, Queen Regent of Spain (to support a special relationship between Spain and Holy Roman Empire)

The first 12 years of Francis’s life was happy with his parents being very involved with their children’s upbringings. He was initially under the care of royal governesses, among them being Claire, Duchess of Berry and Maria, wife ofMarshal Jean d'Estrées, Count of Estrées (1624–1707).

When Francis reached the age of seven, he was removed from the care of women and placed in the society of men. He received Francis, Duke of Orleans as his governor and was tutored by Hardouin de Péréfixe de Beaumont, Archbishop of Paris.

It was during a tutorial about French history, that Dauphin Francis received the news of his future, with his father dying of a heart attack.

Francis, Duke of Orleans, quickly transported his great-nephew to Reims Cathedral, where Charles-Maurice Le Tellier, Archbishop of Reims, crowned the 12 year old king, with 57 year old Duke, declared himself regent for the second time, but starting the new tradition of declaring his support to the king, kneeling in front of his king saying:
I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the King of France against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the Kingthat I take this obligation freely. So help me God.

For the next five years, known commonly as the “Reign of two Francises” the elder Francis would include the younger on all political matters, teaching the way of ruling as they went along.

During his sixteenth birthday, a grand party was held, in his honour. The party was also used as a match making, with nobilities of all ranks, from Viscomte to Emperors, such as Maria Antonia of Austria, daughter of Emperor Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor, Anne Marie d'Orléans, a cousin as the daughter of Francis, Duke of Orléans and of Henrietta of England.

His eyes through the night were drawn to an unlikely match, King Charles II of England had relished in being invited to a party bringing along with him, his niece, Her Highness The Lady Anne of York, second daughter of the Duke of York, and his first wife, Anne Hyde.

King Charles II was over the moon that his niece was picked as a bride for the King of France. The wedding was planned for two years later when both bride and groom turned 18, allowing the wedding to coinciding with his full coronation.

The pair were happily married, however their marriage was plagued by miscarriages and stillborns, with only 5 of the 17 pregnancies seeing the babies born healthy, it is said Francis’s love grew for his wife with each pregnancy and he shared her grief, pushing away all attempts at mistresses coming on to him.

On 6 February 1685, Charles II died without legitimate issue, leading to Anne’s father, James to inherited the thrones of England, Ireland and Scotland.
On 10 June 1688, James saw the birth of a son and heir, Prince James Francis Edward, with Francis being his middle namesake as well as his brother-in-law’s Godfather.
French spies in England, found evidence that some members of the English court were trying to take away the Divine Right of Prince James of Wales, and invite his older sister, Anglican Mary and her Protestant husband, William of Orange.

In response, Francis requested the French navy to keep an eye on the Dutch port of Hellevoetsluis, by early October, news of nearly 500 ships being organised reached France and so the great Battle of the English Channel began with Anglo-French navy defeating the Dutch fleet, killing William of Orange.

This next eight years, saw a new religious war engulf Europe, between Catholics and Protestants. The alliance between France and England grew with Francis and his father-in-law, arranging a trade agreement between the neighbouring nations, assisting each other in putting down Protestant protest as well as blockading thechannel from enemy nations.

In 1701, when news of King James II’s death reached France, Francis was publicly more affected than his wife, the daughter. Francis and Anne attended the coronation of her brother King James III.

For the last 21 years of his reign Francis saw the expansion of land in the colonies including Nova Frankia (OT Louisiana) assist his country’s economy.
However is death at the age of 57, came following a sickness he hid from the public, many modern doctors to be cancer, with a dramatic weight loss being the hardest to hide. He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son.


His majesty Francois III reviewing the artillery upon the field of Versailles, 1686.

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(5) Pierre had been Duke of Normandy at birth whilst his elder brother Francis had been Dauphin. Francis had died in a horse riding accident at 16, celebrating the fact that his bride was on the way to Paris. This meant that 13 year old Pierre was now Dauphin, his brothers betrothal to Magdalena of Soissons, daughter of the Premiere Prince Du Sang, now hinged upon him. Magdalena was 15, only two years older so the pair were not officially married until 1710. They reportedly had a happy marriage and produced several children children who survived infancy.

A big change in France occurred only one year after Pierre had ascended the throne. The Premiere Prince Du Sang, a role which had been held by his wife's family for about 130 years, held by the senior most male line descendant of a monarch who wasn't a son or grandson, shifted to the Dukes of Orleans. Francois of Orleans (son of Henry IV) had been incredibly long lived, but in 1723 his own grandson, Jean Robert, had become Duke and Premiere Prince Du Sang. This meant that any influence the Dukes of Soissons had hoped to wield through the marriage of the Queen and their role had largely evaporated.

Shortly after this transfer of position, Europe fell into the War of the Spanish Infantas. Charles III of Spain (son of Charles II and Maria Anna of Neuberg) died childless after his wife died in childbirth with their son.

Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire was the male line heir to Spain, but this would increase the Habsburg domains and influence of the HRE to a worrying level. And nobody wanted that.

But the Spanish crown could pass through a female line, and both of Charles III's sisters had male heirs - the eldest Mariana (after her grandmother) was married to James III of England and Scotland which meant that James, the Prince of Wales, was the rightful heir.

However, Louise was the wife of the Duke of Beja, brother of Joao V, King of Portugal, and she pushed for her own son as a compromise candidate to become King of Spain.

And nobody wanted either of those either. Hostilities would continue for a decade, with France backing the English candidate (Pierre and James were cousins, after all), the Holy Roman Empire pushing the Emperor and Portugal pulling together a coalition of minor nations, alongside the Russians.

In the end, the Treaty of the Hague saw Spain partitioned, with the north handed to England, and the south handed to Portugal. Nobody particularly liked it, but a decade of war had made Europe weary of the succession.

The remaining ten years of Pierres reign were peaceful, and the King died in 1747 with his wife at his side, she would survive him by 13 years, seeing his nephew, Phillipe, Duke of Anjou become King of France.


Pierre of France, exhibiting his skill at sculpting, 1746.

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(6) The final years of Pierre's reign, albeit peaceful, were full of heartache as the House of Bourbon suffered losses. From Orleans to the surviving sons of the King, it ended with the succession pointing at Stanislas-Phillipe, Duke of Anjou. The Bourbon-Anjou began with Robert, Duke of Anjou who after his marriage into the Cröy inherited the county of Fontenoy within the Imperial Duchy of Lorraine in 1645, and so as an Imperial Prince sought to make his own glory. His son; Louis-Jean, would eventually become a general of great renown, firstly serving his cousins in France, and then moving on to serve the Imperial armies in the early 1680s, the Kings of Spain later that decade, and lastly the Polish King; Jakob I Wisnowiecki, and became such a fixture of the polish court, he would marry the eldest daughter of the King; Karolina of Poland, with his son being born a full year after their wedding. That son; Stanislas-Jean, was even considered a candidate for the Polish throne in 1696 as the eldest grandson of Jakob I, but lost to his maternal cousin; Wilhelm of Teschen. Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou would return to France in 1708, bringing the so-called "Angevin Treasure" with him. A year later, he would marry the daughter of his majesty; Francis III, giving the king a grandson; Stanislas-Phillipe of Anjou.

Inheriting the throne of France at the age of 37, Stanislas-Phillipe chose the regal name of Phillipe VII for himself, and would continue his uncle's policies of Peace and the endearing will to protect that Peace. Remarkably little would threaten that Peace aside from the war of the Polish succession, where France would support the Kings cousin; Zygmunt, Prince Wisnowiecki, the grandson of Jakob I of Poland, as opposed to Frederick of Hohenzollern, elected by rebel members of the Sejm.

Phillipe VII would pass after a stroke in 1764, and the French throne would pass to Jean III.


Phillipe VII in Hunting clothes, 1748.

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(7) Jean was the second son of Phillipe VII, born Duke of Normandy, becoming Dauphin upon the death of his elder brother in 1750. After the Orleans line had been cut short, Phillipe VII had briefly been First Prince of the Blood, but upon his coronation that became the duty of the Dukes of Berry.

The male line of the Duke of Berry extended back to the youngest son of Henry IV, Charles. The Duke for much of Jean III's reign was Gaston, 5th Duke of Orleans, great great grandson of Charles. Gaston had married Yolande of Beja, daughter of the then present Duke of Beja, who also acted as Governor of Portuguese Spain.

When it came to the question of who Jean might marry, that question was answered with Gaston's daughter, Isabeau of Berry, only a year younger than the Dauphin. They married in 1761 and by the time of Jean becoming King of France, they already had a son and a daughter, and would go on to have four more children.

The continued "Age of Anjou" saw the relative peace of his father's reign continue into Jean's. Of course, there were minor skirmishes and a few colonies swapped hands in compensation or as countries needed funds. But nothing escalated to the level of the War of the Spanish Infantas, or the Battle of the Channel. Even difficulties with the colonies in Nueva Frankia were minimal, with the territories under the day to day supervsion of the Duke of Soissons as Viceroy.

This would continue to 1800 when Jean died after a bridge he was riding over collapsed and he fell into a freezing river. Although he survived, he would later die of hypothermia and be succeeded by his eldest son; Phillipe, Dauphin of France.
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(8) The Eldest of the two surviving sons of Jean III, and named for his decade older sibling; Phillippe, Dauphin of France, Phillipe inherited throne at the age of twenty eight, and despite his years, is said to have remained a child throughout. Obsessed by the French army, Phillipe VIII would often gather two or three regiments in Parade purely for his own amusement, and delight in their uniforms and drill.​
Plagued by a lack of Mental capability, it could be said that Phillipe VIII was the best king for the times, as it was the unofficial Regency council, headed by the Kings brother that slowly ushered in the Constitutional Monarchy of France, with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain.​
A.sidenote of Phillipes reign would be the death of Antoine, Duke of Berry and thus the extinction of the other lines of the house of Bourbon, aside from the Conti and the Bourbon-Soissons.​
At the age of 40, the now powerless King would pass, and it was determined that the king had choked upon his own spittle, and was succeeded by his brother; Gaston​

View attachment 589537
(9)
His eldest brother Phillipe, Dauphin of France, died aged 9, after a severe seizure, caused him to bite his tongue and bleed to death.

Without a male heir, Jean III was desperate for a son, a second son also called Phillipe was born 1772 and Gaston was born in 1775, the last child of Isabeau of Berry and named after her father, Gaston of Berry. Unlike any of his older siblings, he was born with no physical or mental disability.

While his older brother was not expected to last long, Gaston was raised and tutored in the way of running the State.

Gaston was 25 when his father died and some nobility, wished for him to claim the throne over his older brother, however Gaston believed that God had seen fit to keep Phillipe alive, only he will sit on the throne as king, while Gaston acted as his unofficial Head of Regency council.

No marriages were arranged for Phillipe as he never called for a female companion, preferring to watch soldiers parade.
As the heir to his brother Gaston was seen as the most eligible bachelor in Europe, he married in 1802, Charlotte, Princess Royal of Britain, the British isles becoming a United Kingdom under the reign of her father, Charles V.
As regent to his brother, Gaston found that trying to keep all the power under the rule of a single person, was time consuming and lead to unpopular actions being blamed solely on that person.

Over the 13 years as regent, Gaston was able to reform the political part of the monarchy to form a Constitutional Monarchy with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain, which over numerous kings has seen power devolved to the people.

Gaston was deeply saddened when he heard that his brother had choked upon his own spittle and presided over a funeral fit for his brother.

With the crown now on 38 year old, King Gaston, many expected for the constitution to be altered to fit him, however Gaston explained that “the office of government is for the people to decide, I will work with the government to assist in the interior politics of France but I believe I am better suited concentrating on religious matters and foreign affairs.”

In 1814, Gaston saw his country hold its first election, with property owning men vote for their Chancellor, as well as county representatives. This election saw retired General, Jean-de-Dieu Soult, elected Chancellor and leading a traditionalist nationalist party to the majority.

While political harmony was being felt in the West, the rest of European, were seeing unrest and revolts as more and more citizens were calling for Revolution,

This resulted in an Austrian monarchist, Johann Georg Hiedler, aged 30, assassinating the 45 year old King, as he rode in his open carriage, while screaming “I killed one king to save a hundred others”



(10) Pierre was the eldest child of Gaston I and his wife, and was taught from early in his life, that the ideal monarch was a figurehead as opposed to a russian style autocrat, and did his best to fulfil this statement. Before He took the throne, as a young man, he would attempt to bring a number of Parisian prostitutes into the palace, and when the King did find out, he took a horsecrop to his son, reminding his son of his duties and of the Press.

When his father died, and Pierre, Dauphin of France became Pierre II, King of France, France was entering a truly golden age, with her empire spanning the globe and nearly half of all humanity speaking French. At the age of 23, Pierre would marry Euphemia of the Netherlands, and the pair would have three children; two sons and a Daughter. It would be in 1824, when Pierre would negotiate for his younger brother; Charles, Duke of Orleans to marry the heiress of Cosimo V, Grand Duke of Tuscany and with the death of Cosimo in 1830, Charles and his wife would be crowned as Grand Duke and Duchess of Tuscany.

The thirty nine year rule of Pierre saw major expansion of the French Empire, particularly in South East Asia, and it would be in 1859 that Pierre II would pass and the throne of France would pass to his son, Guillaume.




(11) Guillaume was born in 1835, during the reign of his father, named after his maternal grandfather, William of the Netherlands. He was the second son, created Duke of Orleans at birth, and married to Princess Militza of Montenegro, a distant cousin through the Bourbon-Soissons line, of the House of Petrović-Njegoš. They were married in 1855, and by the time of both his elder brother and father's death four years later, had produced only a daughter, Vjera.

In the time since the likely union of France and Navarre almost three centuries earlier, Navarre had flourished under the House of Albert. Despite the impact of the War of the Spanish Infantas, Navarre enjoyed a happy trading partnership with their neighbours, both France and English Spain.

However, through a fluke of marriage and succession, Navarre became part of the United Kingdom of Portugal (alongside Brazil, the Algarve and Portuguese Spain) which put England and France in the peculiar position that they effectively controlled access to Navarre by both land and sea. And they took advantage of this, essentially holding the tiny nation hostage in order to acquire preferential trade partnerships.

Guillaume went to lengths to stress behind closed doors that this was the will of the Parliament Francis, the newer bicameral version rather than the older version established by Henry V, now known as the Parliament de L'Ancien Regime, filled with members of the nobility.

Guillaume only ruled for 20 years, but continued the expansion into South East Asia, renaming Timor in honour of his wife on their twentieth wedding anniversary. He would die a few years later of a stroke, to be succeeded by his Cousin; Lèopold, Duke of Anjou.



(12) At the death of Guillaume I, the throne would pass to another grandson of Gaston I; the Duke of Anjou. Born in 1839 and baptised as Lèopold Stanislas Phillipe of Anjou, there was little chance of him ever receiving the throne of France, apart from a series of events; firstly Guillaume of France only produced a daughter, and then the declaration of 1843 came, in which Carlo I of Tuscany and his descendents forfeited their right to the French Throne as forced by the Parliament of Tuscany in order to retain their throne, and lastly the death of his elder brother in 1870 not only made Lèopold the duke of Anjou, but unannounced heir to the throne of France. Lèopold had married his distant cousin in 1860, and by the time of being made Duke, had 5 children, with his eldest son; _________, becoming Dauphin of France.

during the 1880s, The French Empire was eclipsed industrially and militarily by the newly formed German Empire; a colossal industrial power stretching from the Adriatic to the North and Baltic seas. The French parliament was gripped by fear of invasion, and in an attempt to assuage fears, began a wholesale military expansion, so much so that by 1893, the military was some three times the size of was a decade earlier. The King was present at many parades in this period, as a symbol of nationalism and pride in the French Empire.

In 1897, the King would fall from his horse at one such parade, and dragged across the sand of the parade ground, and would pass a week later, succeeded by Henry.



(13) Henry VI was planned from birth to marry Vjera of France and Montenegro, and this happened when he was 18 and she was 19. The first of three children followed shortly after.

Whilst Germany had become a military colossus during his father's reign, the realisation dawned that a cadet branch of the House of Bourbon, the House of Soissons, now occupied the thrones of Portugal (and thus Navarre, the problem of which remained unsolved), England, the Netherlands and Italy. This meant that France was surrounded, and despite the occasional marriage between the main Soissons line and the Bourbon-Conde one, the House of Soissons was far enough removed that no real loyalty existed between them.

The senior most Soissons was 27th in line to the French throne, after the lines of the Dukes of Normandy and Chartres who had four sons each. Still, the German Kaiser forced the hand of the Parliament Francais and Henry by forcing them to sign a law that removed the male line of Charles, Count of Soissons, from the line of succession. Despite the fact that the current Duke was unlikely to ascend to the French throne, this still caused some diplomatic problems with the various monarchs descended from the Count making land grabs to German and French colonial assets.

This meant that the French Navy was deployed to protect those assets, leading to conflicts, led in South East Asia by the Soissons Powers by James, Duke of Porto. This culminates in the Battle of Kowloon, in which the German vessel Ingelfingen sank the Portuguese ship, Queen Victoria.

By the time news of this reached Paris, Henry was dead, leaving the whole mess for his successor, Gaston , his oldest child to steer France through.


(14) Gaston was born in 1877 before his grandfather became King, but after it was clear he was next inline, making Gaston at his birth third inline behind his father and grandfather, so he was raised to someday be King. Early in his life the German Empire was an antagonist of France as the two powerful nations armed themselves against each other and pursed colonial Empires as rivals.

The old Holy Roman Empire had been dissolved when the electors in 1848 had failed to agree on a new Emperor, with a split between Wilhelm Hohenzoller, the King of Prussia and the heir of the just passed Joseph Michael Hapsburg of Austria through his mother Maria of Hapsburg, and a third cousin, Grigori Kovács, descended from the Hapsburg through his grandmother, an aunt of Joseph Michael. The result was the two new Empires, the German and the Hungarian, which had the eastern regions that had been part of the Hapsburg realm.

It was the next German Kaiser, Wilhem I's son, Frederick I, that was the Emperor of the rising German Empire during Gaston's youth. By the time Gaston's father was King, France had forged a wary truce with Germany as the two recognized their various colonial holdings. This was cemented with two marriages as Gaston's sister, the Princess Louisa, in 1900 married the Kaiser's heir, Prince Frederick, who beame Kaiser Frederick II in 1905, and the Dauphin Gaston married the Kaiser's daughter, Camila, in 1901. It was Frederick II who impacted the French to disinherit the Soissons cadet branch.

Added to the alliance between France and Germany was the other rival of Germany's enemy Hungary, the Ottoman Empire. This resulted in Hungary's ally and Germany's main enemy to the East, the Russian Empire, to ally with Hungary, Portugal, England, and Italy.

As Gaston took the throne, it was hoped that the conflict in Asia would remain a limited colonial war. But that was not to be when Hungarian forces marched on Vienna, the secondary capital of the German Empire.

As the war was fought not only on four fronts in Europe, but throughout the colonial empires in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific, this was called the War of the Global Empires or the Imperial War. (Later the First Imperial War.)

At home the main fighting for the French was the northern front with the English who were allied with Holland and the southern front with Portugal. Sporadic fighting took place on the Italian frontier, but the Alps limited the fighting and Italy focused on fighting the Germans to the east.

It was a terrible war unlike any before as the new machine guns made the land combat become trench warfare that turned into a stalemate. At sea the fighting was in giant coal driven iron clad battleships and submarines. Meanwhile airships dropped bombs and, as the war continued, more and more machine gun armed Aeroplanes fought each other in dog fights as they escorted or attacked the fleet of bomber airships. This meant that cities behind the lines were bombed.

Millions of the French died in the war, an entire generation of young men decimated. As the stalemate turned from months into years in Europe, the battles in the colonial empires went back and forth. In 1917 Japan joined the French alliance and Russia now had a two front war. Then the Chinese Empire joined on the side of Russia and invaded Indochina.

But the worst part was the spread of disease. In late 1918 a new Influenza known as the Portugueese Flu, swept like a plague through the Continent. In January of 1920, without any end of the stalemate in Europe in sight and the colonial fortunes of the French alliance not going well, the King contracted the virus and died.

(15) Born in 1915, Henry VII came to the throne unexpectedly, as his father, the Dauphin, was a healthy man in his early 20s. However, due to the outbreak of the Flu, the Dauphin died a few days before King Gaston II.

Henry VII's reign is one of the shortest reigns in French history, if it can even be called that. It lasted for only one year. King Henry VII died in 1921 aged 6, after only about a month of "reigning" under a regency council headed by his uncle, the Duke of Anjou. He died due to the same influenza that took his father and grandfather.



(16) Guillaume, Duke of Anjou went from being third in line to the throne to the King of France in the space of six months as his father, brother and nephew died of the Portuguese Flu. He briefly acted as Regent for his infant nephews (incorrectly ascribed to being born in 1915 by several sources, rather than 1919) brief reign before becoming King aged only 18 himself. He depended greatly upon the experience of his mother, Dowager Queen Camilla, and his grandmother, Queen Vjera, to navigate his way through the closing days of the War, brought to an early finish by the pandemic. The line of succession had been decimated, the Soissons had inched closer - the senior most figure now sitting at twentieth in line to the throne.

So Guillaume set our to marry and soon, finding a match with Grand Duchess Marina of Russia, fourth daughter of Tsar Konstantin of Russia, in 1922. Marina was plain and boring but she produced several children, all of whom survived to adulthood.


The Duke of Aumale c. 1927

Marina died aged 49 in 1953, with children and grandchildren around her. Although they produced numerous issue, the marriage was practical and it was clear that Guillaume was affectionate to his distant cousin, the Duke of Aumale, from the line of the Duke of Chartres. When Marina died, Guillaume moved the Duke into the late Queens quarters adjoining his own at the Palais d'Leopold. This might have been scandalous only fifty years earlier, but the liberal attutude of the post-War generation brushed it aside - Who cared who the King contorted with.

The Duke of Aumale was present when the King passed away during an episode of their favourite television serial, Professeur Quoi (airing 1963 to 1989) and was given the honorary position in the funeral of a grieving spouse.

Guillaume was succeeded by ...... , his ......


The House of Bourbon-Conde

Charles de Bourbon, Duke of Vendome, b. 1489, d. 1537
a) Antoine, King of Navarre, b. 1518, r. 1537 to 1562​
1) Henri III, King of Navarre, b. 1553, r. 1572 to 1589​
2) Catherine II, Queen of Navarre, b. 1559, r. 1589 to 1604​
b) Louis, Prince of Conde, b. 1530, d. 1569​
1) Henri I, Prince of Conde, b. 1552, d. 1588​
a) Henry IV of France, b. 1588, r. 1589 to 1646, m. Elizabeth Stuart (1596 to 1662)​
2) Francois, Prince of Conti, b. 1558, d. 1614​
3) Charles, Count of Soissons, b. 1566, d. 1612​
a) Louis, Count/Duke of Soissons, b. 1604, d. 1641​
1) line continues


Henry IV of France, b. 1588, r. 1589 to 1646, m. Elizabeth Stuart (1596 to 1662)
1) Henry, Dauphin of France, b. 1616, d. 1643​
a) Henry V of France, prev. Duke of Burgundy, b. 1640, r 1646 to 1655, then 1655 to 1678, m. Jeanne of Savoy (1645 to 1703)​
1) Jeanne of France, Madame Royale, b. 1664​
2) Francis III of France b. 1665, r. 1678 to 1722 m. 168, Anne of England (1665–1714)​
b) Jeanne b. 1685 D.1711, m. Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou​
c) Anne b. 1686​
g) Francis, Dauphin of France, b. 1689, d. 1705​
h) Maria b. 1690​
i) Pierre I of France, prev. Duke of Normandy, b. 1692, r. 1722 to 1747, m. 1710, Magdalena of Soissons (1690 to 1760)​
1) Pierre, Dauphin of France b.1712 d.1719​
2) Louis, Duke of Normandy b.1712 d.1719​
3) Charles, Dauphin of France b.1715 d.1731​
4) Jeanne of France b.1713 d.1762​
5) Isabeau of France b. 1714 d.1781​
3) Christine of France​
2) Rene I of France, prev. Duke of Vendome, b. 1618, r. 1655​
3) Francis, Duke of Orleans, b. 1621, Regent 1655 to 1658, then 1678 to 1683, d. 1705 m. Henrietta of England (1644–1670)​
a) Francis II, Duke of Orleans, b. 1665, d. 1723​
1) Jean Robert, Duke of Orleans, Premiere Prince Du Sang, b. 1690 d.1742​
4) Robert, Duke of Anjou b. 1624 d.1690, m. Marie-Alexandrine de Cröy​
a) Louis-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1650 d.1698, m. Karolina Wisnowiecki, Princess of Poland​
1) Louis-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1650 d.1698, m. Karolina Wisnowiecki, Princess of Poland​
a) Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1681 d.1740, m. Jeanne of France​
1) Phillipe VII, King of France (also Premiere Prince Du Sang 1742 to 1747) b. 1710, r. 1747 to 1764, m. Claudia of Savoy​
5) Charles, Duke of Berry b. 1625, d. 1687, m. Claire Clémence de Maillé (1628-1694)​
a) several generations
a) Gaston, 5th Duke of Berry, b. 1710, d. 1790, Premiere Prince du Sang 1760 to 1790, m. Yolande of Beja (1712 to 1772)​
1) Gaston b. 1735, d. 1755​
2) Isabeau of Berry, b. 1743, m. Jean III, King of France​
3) Antoine, 6th Duke of Berry, b. 1745, D.1810, Premiere Prince Du Sang 1790 to 1810​

Phillipe VII, King of France (also Premiere Prince Du Sang 1742 to 1747) b. 1710, r. 1747 to 1764, m. Claudia of Savoy
1l Phillipe, Dauphin of France, b. 1740, d. 1750​
2) Jean III, King of France, b. 1742, r. 1764 to 1800, m. Isabeau of Berry (1743 to 1810)​
a) Phillipe, Daupin of France, b.1762 d.1769​
b) Magdalene of France, b.1765​
c) Phillipotte of France, b.1767​
d) Sophia of France, b.1770​
e) Phillipe VIII, King of France, b.1772, r. 1800 to.1813, unmarried​
f) Gaston I, King of France, b.1775, regent 1800 to 1813, r.1813 to 1820, m. Princess Charlotte of the United Kingdom b.1781 d.1856​
1) Pierre II, King of France b. 1802, r.1820 to 1859, m. Princess Euphemia of the Netherlands b.1810 d.1871​
a) Pierre, Dauphin of France, b. 1830, d. 1858​
b) Guillaume I, King of France, prev. Duke of Orleans, b. 1835, r. 1859 to 1879, m Militzia of Montenegro​
1) Vjera of France & Montenegro, b. 1857​
c) Euphemia, Madame Royale, b. 1836, d. 1920, never married​
2) Carlo, Grand Duke of Tuscany b.1805 D.1872, m. Clementine d'Medici, Grand Duchess of Tuscany b.1802 D.1870​
a) line of Bourbon-Tuscany​
3) Henri, Duke of Anjou b.1807 D.1854, m. Teresa, Princess Wisnowiecki b.1810 D.1880​
a) Amèdèè, Duke of Anjou, b.1836 D.1870, never married.​
b) Lèopold I, King of France, previously Duke of Anjou, b. 1839 d.1897, m. Louise of Soissons b.1840 d.1906​
1) Henry VI, King of France, b. 1858, r. 1897 to 1913, m. Vjera of France and Montenegro (1857 to 1935)​
2) 4 other children​
4) Gaston, Duke of Normandy​
a) 4 sons, 6 grandsons​
5) Jean, Duke of Chartres, b. 1811​
a) Jean II, Duke of Chartres, b. 1840​
1) Gaston, Duke of Chartres, b. 1880​
a) Jean, Duke of Aumale, b. 1900​
3) Juliette of France, B.1743​
4) Charles, Duke of Orleans, b.1744 d.1750​
5) Claudia of France, b. 1745​
6) Caroline of France, b. 1745​
Lèopold I, King of France, previously Duke of Anjou, b. 1839 d.1897, m. Louise of Soissons b.1840 d.1906
1) Henry VI, King of France, b. 1858, r. 1897 to 1913, m. Vjera of France and Montenegro (1857 to 1935)​
a) Gaston II, King of France, b.1877, r. 1913-1920, m. Princess Camila Hohenzollern of Berlin (1883 to 1962)​
1) Unamed Dauphin, b. 1901, d. 1920​
a) Henry VII, King of France, b. 19(20), d. 1921​
2) Guillaume II, King of France, b. 1902, Regent 1920 to 1921, r. 1921 to 1970, m. Marina of Russia (1904 to 1953), (m?), Jean, Duke of Aumale, b. 1900, d. 19XX​
b) Princess Louisa, b. 1881, d. 1919, m. Kaiser Frederick II Hohenzollern (1875. r. 1905-1933)​
c) Lèopold b. 1886. d. 1895.​
2) 4 other children​
 
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I'd like to do the next French but I can't even get started until this evening (it's 11:42 am for me right now.)

Is that okay with everyone?
 
Kings of France
Henry III, r. 1574 to 1589 (House of Valois-Angouleme)
Henry IV, r. 1589 to 1646 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (1)

Henry V, r. 1647 to 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Rene "The Usurper", r. (1646 to) 1655 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (2)
Henry V, r. 1655 to 1678 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (3)
Francis III, r. 1678 to 1722 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (4)
Pierre I, r. 1722 to 1747 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (5)
Phillipe VII, r. 1747 to 1764 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (6)
Jean III, r. 1764 to 1800 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (7)
Phillipe VIII, r. 1800 to 1813
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (8)
Gaston I regent 1800 to 1813, r. 1813 to 1820 (House of Bourbon-Conde) (9)
Pierre II, r.1820 to 1859 (House of Bourbon-Conde)
(10)
Guillaume I, r. 1859 to 1879
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (11)
Lèopold I, r.1879 to 1897
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (12)
Henry VI, r. 1897 to 1913
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (13)
Gaston II, r. 1913 to 1920
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (14)
Henry VII, r. 1920 to 1921
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (15)
Guillaume II, r. 1921 to 1970
(House of Bourbon-Conde) (16)
Louis XIII, r. 1921 to present (House of Bourbon-Conde) (17)



(1) After the death of the King of Navarre, Henry IV became heir to the throne of France (Henry III having disinherited the Archbishop of Rouen upon the death of the King of Navarre, the Archbishop would die shortly after, before any attempt to oust the child King could be formulated) at the age of one whilst the throne of Navarre passed to Henry of Navarre's sister, Catherine II. Catherine II would die in 1604, to be succeeded by Henri de Rohan as Henri IV of Navarre, until 1638.

Henry IV of France would marry Elizabeth Stuart, daughter of James VI and I of England in 1613 when she was 17 and Henry was 25. The couple would have 13 children from 1614 to 1632, out of which 8 were boys. Only 4 of these children predeceased their father (compared to 6 who predeceased their mother). Despite his father and cousin having been lead Huegenot figures, Pope Clement insisted that the young King be raised as a devout Roman Catholic which avoided the War of Religion that had been threatened when Henry III of Navarre had been heir.

Until 1614 (for 24 years), the Premiere Prince Du Sang was the Kings uncle, the Prince of Conti (who also acted as Regent until 1606), and subsequently his ten year old cousin, Louis. Henry would later raise the countship to a dukedom upon Louis' marriage.

Henry would die in 1646 in Paris, surrounded by his children and grandchildren, to be succeeded by his son , Rene I

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(2) Rene was never meant to be King. As the legitimate heir, his nephew was still to young to rule Rene was named Regent until His Highness could ascend to the throne. However Rene abused his position to make himself the real power behind the throne ruling in all but name. His rule was fraught with challenges from backers of the heir who grew into a seemingly promising ruler, yet was continuously shut out of decision making by Rene. As a devoted Catholic Rene encouraged repression against the French Huguenots which led to the bloody Nevers Revolt in 1652. While the revolt was ultimately destroyed the Regents authority was shaken and he had to rely increasingly on various local landowners to shore up support giving them large concessions. These concessions, known to history as the Renian Concessions, would haunt his successors. In 1655 Rene would finally outmaneuver the Heir's supporters in court and force him to flee to Savoy. He was crowned King Rene I of France soon after to little fanfare and much anger among the nobility. When offers of increased privileges didn't satisfy their anger Rene resorted to military action. The resulting years of intermittent conflict saw the balance of power see-saw between the King and the nobility who largely supported the legitimate heir. In the end however Rene, never the master military strategist was killed in battle during the Battle of Calais. The crown was left to his nephew, Henry

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(3) Henry V reign had effectively begun in 1646 with the death of his grandfather, following the death of his father, Le Grand Dauphin, three years earlier. Aged only 6 at the point of his succession, his uncle, the Duke of Vendome, had taken control of court, sideload Henry and eventually taken the throne himself. In 1655, with the young King nearly of age, he fled to Savoy where he regrouped with the Duke of Soissons, and two of his other uncles, the Dukes of Orleans and Anjou, and marshalled an army that defeated the royal forces of Rene The Usurper. By Christmas of 1655, Henry V had regained his rightful place on the throne and was recrowned in a ceremony witnessed by all three of his surviving uncles, including the Duke of Orleans who had been made Regent for the next 3 year's until Henry reached 18.

He would subsequently marry Jeanne of Savoy in 1663, daughter of Philibert, Duke of Savoy, to further cement the friendship and alliance after sheltering him in 1655. The marriage would not be as fruitful as that of his grandfather, providing only three children, of whom two were daughters, named Jeanne and Christine.

After the Reneian Concessions had fielded power to the local landowners, much of Henry's reign was spent attempting to appease them. Whilst Henry V was not an adherent to the concept of the divine right of kings, having been somewhat humbled in the fight for his crown, he did believe that a strong centralised seat of government was the best option for France. Therefore, Henry considered the creation of a Parliament Francais, inspired by the English model of his Stuart relations, was the avenue to explore. Thus the remains of his reign were spent ingratiating himself with the nobility that would sit within the Parliament, and the composition would impact numerous national military and agricultural decisions that were made from 1670 to 1678.

Jeanne, Madame Royale, his eldest child, would only be 14 when her father passed away in 1678 of a heart attack. This meant that the throne passed to Dauphin Francis, his 12 year old son.

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(4) Francis III was born on 4th October 1665, Feast of St Francis of Assisi, being named in honour of the saint and his great-uncle Francis, Duke of Orleans, who was also his god father, along with King Charles II of England. His god mothers were Henrietta, Duchess of Orléans (Wife of Francis and sister of Charles II) and Mariana of Austria, Queen Regent of Spain (to support a special relationship between Spain and Holy Roman Empire)

The first 12 years of Francis’s life was happy with his parents being very involved with their children’s upbringings. He was initially under the care of royal governesses, among them being Claire, Duchess of Berry and Maria, wife ofMarshal Jean d'Estrées, Count of Estrées (1624–1707).

When Francis reached the age of seven, he was removed from the care of women and placed in the society of men. He received Francis, Duke of Orleans as his governor and was tutored by Hardouin de Péréfixe de Beaumont, Archbishop of Paris.

It was during a tutorial about French history, that Dauphin Francis received the news of his future, with his father dying of a heart attack.

Francis, Duke of Orleans, quickly transported his great-nephew to Reims Cathedral, where Charles-Maurice Le Tellier, Archbishop of Reims, crowned the 12 year old king, with 57 year old Duke, declared himself regent for the second time, but starting the new tradition of declaring his support to the king, kneeling in front of his king saying:
I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the King of France against all enemies, foreign and domestic; that I will bear true faith and allegiance to the Kingthat I take this obligation freely. So help me God.

For the next five years, known commonly as the “Reign of two Francises” the elder Francis would include the younger on all political matters, teaching the way of ruling as they went along.

During his sixteenth birthday, a grand party was held, in his honour. The party was also used as a match making, with nobilities of all ranks, from Viscomte to Emperors, such as Maria Antonia of Austria, daughter of Emperor Leopold I, Holy Roman Emperor, Anne Marie d'Orléans, a cousin as the daughter of Francis, Duke of Orléans and of Henrietta of England.

His eyes through the night were drawn to an unlikely match, King Charles II of England had relished in being invited to a party bringing along with him, his niece, Her Highness The Lady Anne of York, second daughter of the Duke of York, and his first wife, Anne Hyde.

King Charles II was over the moon that his niece was picked as a bride for the King of France. The wedding was planned for two years later when both bride and groom turned 18, allowing the wedding to coinciding with his full coronation.

The pair were happily married, however their marriage was plagued by miscarriages and stillborns, with only 5 of the 17 pregnancies seeing the babies born healthy, it is said Francis’s love grew for his wife with each pregnancy and he shared her grief, pushing away all attempts at mistresses coming on to him.

On 6 February 1685, Charles II died without legitimate issue, leading to Anne’s father, James to inherited the thrones of England, Ireland and Scotland.
On 10 June 1688, James saw the birth of a son and heir, Prince James Francis Edward, with Francis being his middle namesake as well as his brother-in-law’s Godfather.
French spies in England, found evidence that some members of the English court were trying to take away the Divine Right of Prince James of Wales, and invite his older sister, Anglican Mary and her Protestant husband, William of Orange.

In response, Francis requested the French navy to keep an eye on the Dutch port of Hellevoetsluis, by early October, news of nearly 500 ships being organised reached France and so the great Battle of the English Channel began with Anglo-French navy defeating the Dutch fleet, killing William of Orange.

This next eight years, saw a new religious war engulf Europe, between Catholics and Protestants. The alliance between France and England grew with Francis and his father-in-law, arranging a trade agreement between the neighbouring nations, assisting each other in putting down Protestant protest as well as blockading thechannel from enemy nations.

In 1701, when news of King James II’s death reached France, Francis was publicly more affected than his wife, the daughter. Francis and Anne attended the coronation of her brother King James III.

For the last 21 years of his reign Francis saw the expansion of land in the colonies including Nova Frankia (OT Louisiana) assist his country’s economy.
However is death at the age of 57, came following a sickness he hid from the public, many modern doctors to be cancer, with a dramatic weight loss being the hardest to hide. He was succeeded by his eldest surviving son.


His majesty Francois III reviewing the artillery upon the field of Versailles, 1686.

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(5) Pierre had been Duke of Normandy at birth whilst his elder brother Francis had been Dauphin. Francis had died in a horse riding accident at 16, celebrating the fact that his bride was on the way to Paris. This meant that 13 year old Pierre was now Dauphin, his brothers betrothal to Magdalena of Soissons, daughter of the Premiere Prince Du Sang, now hinged upon him. Magdalena was 15, only two years older so the pair were not officially married until 1710. They reportedly had a happy marriage and produced several children children who survived infancy.

A big change in France occurred only one year after Pierre had ascended the throne. The Premiere Prince Du Sang, a role which had been held by his wife's family for about 130 years, held by the senior most male line descendant of a monarch who wasn't a son or grandson, shifted to the Dukes of Orleans. Francois of Orleans (son of Henry IV) had been incredibly long lived, but in 1723 his own grandson, Jean Robert, had become Duke and Premiere Prince Du Sang. This meant that any influence the Dukes of Soissons had hoped to wield through the marriage of the Queen and their role had largely evaporated.

Shortly after this transfer of position, Europe fell into the War of the Spanish Infantas. Charles III of Spain (son of Charles II and Maria Anna of Neuberg) died childless after his wife died in childbirth with their son.

Charles VI of the Holy Roman Empire was the male line heir to Spain, but this would increase the Habsburg domains and influence of the HRE to a worrying level. And nobody wanted that.

But the Spanish crown could pass through a female line, and both of Charles III's sisters had male heirs - the eldest Mariana (after her grandmother) was married to James III of England and Scotland which meant that James, the Prince of Wales, was the rightful heir.

However, Louise was the wife of the Duke of Beja, brother of Joao V, King of Portugal, and she pushed for her own son as a compromise candidate to become King of Spain.

And nobody wanted either of those either. Hostilities would continue for a decade, with France backing the English candidate (Pierre and James were cousins, after all), the Holy Roman Empire pushing the Emperor and Portugal pulling together a coalition of minor nations, alongside the Russians.

In the end, the Treaty of the Hague saw Spain partitioned, with the north handed to England, and the south handed to Portugal. Nobody particularly liked it, but a decade of war had made Europe weary of the succession.

The remaining ten years of Pierres reign were peaceful, and the King died in 1747 with his wife at his side, she would survive him by 13 years, seeing his nephew, Phillipe, Duke of Anjou become King of France.


Pierre of France, exhibiting his skill at sculpting, 1746.

~~~~~~~~~~

(6) The final years of Pierre's reign, albeit peaceful, were full of heartache as the House of Bourbon suffered losses. From Orleans to the surviving sons of the King, it ended with the succession pointing at Stanislas-Phillipe, Duke of Anjou. The Bourbon-Anjou began with Robert, Duke of Anjou who after his marriage into the Cröy inherited the county of Fontenoy within the Imperial Duchy of Lorraine in 1645, and so as an Imperial Prince sought to make his own glory. His son; Louis-Jean, would eventually become a general of great renown, firstly serving his cousins in France, and then moving on to serve the Imperial armies in the early 1680s, the Kings of Spain later that decade, and lastly the Polish King; Jakob I Wisnowiecki, and became such a fixture of the polish court, he would marry the eldest daughter of the King; Karolina of Poland, with his son being born a full year after their wedding. That son; Stanislas-Jean, was even considered a candidate for the Polish throne in 1696 as the eldest grandson of Jakob I, but lost to his maternal cousin; Wilhelm of Teschen. Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou would return to France in 1708, bringing the so-called "Angevin Treasure" with him. A year later, he would marry the daughter of his majesty; Francis III, giving the king a grandson; Stanislas-Phillipe of Anjou.

Inheriting the throne of France at the age of 37, Stanislas-Phillipe chose the regal name of Phillipe VII for himself, and would continue his uncle's policies of Peace and the endearing will to protect that Peace. Remarkably little would threaten that Peace aside from the war of the Polish succession, where France would support the Kings cousin; Zygmunt, Prince Wisnowiecki, the grandson of Jakob I of Poland, as opposed to Frederick of Hohenzollern, elected by rebel members of the Sejm.

Phillipe VII would pass after a stroke in 1764, and the French throne would pass to Jean III.


Phillipe VII in Hunting clothes, 1748.

~~~~~~~~~~


(7) Jean was the second son of Phillipe VII, born Duke of Normandy, becoming Dauphin upon the death of his elder brother in 1750. After the Orleans line had been cut short, Phillipe VII had briefly been First Prince of the Blood, but upon his coronation that became the duty of the Dukes of Berry.

The male line of the Duke of Berry extended back to the youngest son of Henry IV, Charles. The Duke for much of Jean III's reign was Gaston, 5th Duke of Orleans, great great grandson of Charles. Gaston had married Yolande of Beja, daughter of the then present Duke of Beja, who also acted as Governor of Portuguese Spain.

When it came to the question of who Jean might marry, that question was answered with Gaston's daughter, Isabeau of Berry, only a year younger than the Dauphin. They married in 1761 and by the time of Jean becoming King of France, they already had a son and a daughter, and would go on to have four more children.

The continued "Age of Anjou" saw the relative peace of his father's reign continue into Jean's. Of course, there were minor skirmishes and a few colonies swapped hands in compensation or as countries needed funds. But nothing escalated to the level of the War of the Spanish Infantas, or the Battle of the Channel. Even difficulties with the colonies in Nueva Frankia were minimal, with the territories under the day to day supervsion of the Duke of Soissons as Viceroy.

This would continue to 1800 when Jean died after a bridge he was riding over collapsed and he fell into a freezing river. Although he survived, he would later die of hypothermia and be succeeded by his eldest son; Phillipe, Dauphin of France.
~~~~~~~~~~




(8) The Eldest of the two surviving sons of Jean III, and named for his decade older sibling; Phillippe, Dauphin of France, Phillipe inherited throne at the age of twenty eight, and despite his years, is said to have remained a child throughout. Obsessed by the French army, Phillipe VIII would often gather two or three regiments in Parade purely for his own amusement, and delight in their uniforms and drill.​
Plagued by a lack of Mental capability, it could be said that Phillipe VIII was the best king for the times, as it was the unofficial Regency council, headed by the Kings brother that slowly ushered in the Constitutional Monarchy of France, with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain.​
A.sidenote of Phillipes reign would be the death of Antoine, Duke of Berry and thus the extinction of the other lines of the house of Bourbon, aside from the Conti and the Bourbon-Soissons.​
At the age of 40, the now powerless King would pass, and it was determined that the king had choked upon his own spittle, and was succeeded by his brother; Gaston​

View attachment 589537
(9)
His eldest brother Phillipe, Dauphin of France, died aged 9, after a severe seizure, caused him to bite his tongue and bleed to death.

Without a male heir, Jean III was desperate for a son, a second son also called Phillipe was born 1772 and Gaston was born in 1775, the last child of Isabeau of Berry and named after her father, Gaston of Berry. Unlike any of his older siblings, he was born with no physical or mental disability.

While his older brother was not expected to last long, Gaston was raised and tutored in the way of running the State.

Gaston was 25 when his father died and some nobility, wished for him to claim the throne over his older brother, however Gaston believed that God had seen fit to keep Phillipe alive, only he will sit on the throne as king, while Gaston acted as his unofficial Head of Regency council.

No marriages were arranged for Phillipe as he never called for a female companion, preferring to watch soldiers parade.
As the heir to his brother Gaston was seen as the most eligible bachelor in Europe, he married in 1802, Charlotte, Princess Royal of Britain, the British isles becoming a United Kingdom under the reign of her father, Charles V.
As regent to his brother, Gaston found that trying to keep all the power under the rule of a single person, was time consuming and lead to unpopular actions being blamed solely on that person.

Over the 13 years as regent, Gaston was able to reform the political part of the monarchy to form a Constitutional Monarchy with a Bicameral system mirroring that of Britain, which over numerous kings has seen power devolved to the people.

Gaston was deeply saddened when he heard that his brother had choked upon his own spittle and presided over a funeral fit for his brother.

With the crown now on 38 year old, King Gaston, many expected for the constitution to be altered to fit him, however Gaston explained that “the office of government is for the people to decide, I will work with the government to assist in the interior politics of France but I believe I am better suited concentrating on religious matters and foreign affairs.”

In 1814, Gaston saw his country hold its first election, with property owning men vote for their Chancellor, as well as county representatives. This election saw retired General, Jean-de-Dieu Soult, elected Chancellor and leading a traditionalist nationalist party to the majority.

While political harmony was being felt in the West, the rest of European, were seeing unrest and revolts as more and more citizens were calling for Revolution,

This resulted in an Austrian monarchist, Johann Georg Hiedler, aged 30, assassinating the 45 year old King, as he rode in his open carriage, while screaming “I killed one king to save a hundred others”



(10) Pierre was the eldest child of Gaston I and his wife, and was taught from early in his life, that the ideal monarch was a figurehead as opposed to a russian style autocrat, and did his best to fulfil this statement. Before He took the throne, as a young man, he would attempt to bring a number of Parisian prostitutes into the palace, and when the King did find out, he took a horsecrop to his son, reminding his son of his duties and of the Press.

When his father died, and Pierre, Dauphin of France became Pierre II, King of France, France was entering a truly golden age, with her empire spanning the globe and nearly half of all humanity speaking French. At the age of 23, Pierre would marry Euphemia of the Netherlands, and the pair would have three children; two sons and a Daughter. It would be in 1824, when Pierre would negotiate for his younger brother; Charles, Duke of Orleans to marry the heiress of Cosimo V, Grand Duke of Tuscany and with the death of Cosimo in 1830, Charles and his wife would be crowned as Grand Duke and Duchess of Tuscany.

The thirty nine year rule of Pierre saw major expansion of the French Empire, particularly in South East Asia, and it would be in 1859 that Pierre II would pass and the throne of France would pass to his son, Guillaume.




(11) Guillaume was born in 1835, during the reign of his father, named after his maternal grandfather, William of the Netherlands. He was the second son, created Duke of Orleans at birth, and married to Princess Militza of Montenegro, a distant cousin through the Bourbon-Soissons line, of the House of Petrović-Njegoš. They were married in 1855, and by the time of both his elder brother and father's death four years later, had produced only a daughter, Vjera.

In the time since the likely union of France and Navarre almost three centuries earlier, Navarre had flourished under the House of Albert. Despite the impact of the War of the Spanish Infantas, Navarre enjoyed a happy trading partnership with their neighbours, both France and English Spain.

However, through a fluke of marriage and succession, Navarre became part of the United Kingdom of Portugal (alongside Brazil, the Algarve and Portuguese Spain) which put England and France in the peculiar position that they effectively controlled access to Navarre by both land and sea. And they took advantage of this, essentially holding the tiny nation hostage in order to acquire preferential trade partnerships.

Guillaume went to lengths to stress behind closed doors that this was the will of the Parliament Francis, the newer bicameral version rather than the older version established by Henry V, now known as the Parliament de L'Ancien Regime, filled with members of the nobility.

Guillaume only ruled for 20 years, but continued the expansion into South East Asia, renaming Timor in honour of his wife on their twentieth wedding anniversary. He would die a few years later of a stroke, to be succeeded by his Cousin; Lèopold, Duke of Anjou.



(12) At the death of Guillaume I, the throne would pass to another grandson of Gaston I; the Duke of Anjou. Born in 1839 and baptised as Lèopold Stanislas Phillipe of Anjou, there was little chance of him ever receiving the throne of France, apart from a series of events; firstly Guillaume of France only produced a daughter, and then the declaration of 1843 came, in which Carlo I of Tuscany and his descendents forfeited their right to the French Throne as forced by the Parliament of Tuscany in order to retain their throne, and lastly the death of his elder brother in 1870 not only made Lèopold the duke of Anjou, but unannounced heir to the throne of France. Lèopold had married his distant cousin in 1860, and by the time of being made Duke, had 5 children, with his eldest son; _________, becoming Dauphin of France.

during the 1880s, The French Empire was eclipsed industrially and militarily by the newly formed German Empire; a colossal industrial power stretching from the Adriatic to the North and Baltic seas. The French parliament was gripped by fear of invasion, and in an attempt to assuage fears, began a wholesale military expansion, so much so that by 1893, the military was some three times the size of was a decade earlier. The King was present at many parades in this period, as a symbol of nationalism and pride in the French Empire.

In 1897, the King would fall from his horse at one such parade, and dragged across the sand of the parade ground, and would pass a week later, succeeded by Henry.



(13) Henry VI was planned from birth to marry Vjera of France and Montenegro, and this happened when he was 18 and she was 19. The first of three children followed shortly after.

Whilst Germany had become a military colossus during his father's reign, the realisation dawned that a cadet branch of the House of Bourbon, the House of Soissons, now occupied the thrones of Portugal (and thus Navarre, the problem of which remained unsolved), England, the Netherlands and Italy. This meant that France was surrounded, and despite the occasional marriage between the main Soissons line and the Bourbon-Conde one, the House of Soissons was far enough removed that no real loyalty existed between them.

The senior most Soissons was 27th in line to the French throne, after the lines of the Dukes of Normandy and Chartres who had four sons each. Still, the German Kaiser forced the hand of the Parliament Francais and Henry by forcing them to sign a law that removed the male line of Charles, Count of Soissons, from the line of succession. Despite the fact that the current Duke was unlikely to ascend to the French throne, this still caused some diplomatic problems with the various monarchs descended from the Count making land grabs to German and French colonial assets.

This meant that the French Navy was deployed to protect those assets, leading to conflicts, led in South East Asia by the Soissons Powers by James, Duke of Porto. This culminates in the Battle of Kowloon, in which the German vessel Ingelfingen sank the Portuguese ship, Queen Victoria.

By the time news of this reached Paris, Henry was dead, leaving the whole mess for his successor, Gaston , his oldest child to steer France through.


(14) Gaston was born in 1877 before his grandfather became King, but after it was clear he was next inline, making Gaston at his birth third inline behind his father and grandfather, so he was raised to someday be King. Early in his life the German Empire was an antagonist of France as the two powerful nations armed themselves against each other and pursed colonial Empires as rivals.

The old Holy Roman Empire had been dissolved when the electors in 1848 had failed to agree on a new Emperor, with a split between Wilhelm Hohenzoller, the King of Prussia and the heir of the just passed Joseph Michael Hapsburg of Austria through his mother Maria of Hapsburg, and a third cousin, Grigori Kovács, descended from the Hapsburg through his grandmother, an aunt of Joseph Michael. The result was the two new Empires, the German and the Hungarian, which had the eastern regions that had been part of the Hapsburg realm.

It was the next German Kaiser, Wilhem I's son, Frederick I, that was the Emperor of the rising German Empire during Gaston's youth. By the time Gaston's father was King, France had forged a wary truce with Germany as the two recognized their various colonial holdings. This was cemented with two marriages as Gaston's sister, the Princess Louisa, in 1900 married the Kaiser's heir, Prince Frederick, who beame Kaiser Frederick II in 1905, and the Dauphin Gaston married the Kaiser's daughter, Camila, in 1901. It was Frederick II who impacted the French to disinherit the Soissons cadet branch.

Added to the alliance between France and Germany was the other rival of Germany's enemy Hungary, the Ottoman Empire. This resulted in Hungary's ally and Germany's main enemy to the East, the Russian Empire, to ally with Hungary, Portugal, England, and Italy.

As Gaston took the throne, it was hoped that the conflict in Asia would remain a limited colonial war. But that was not to be when Hungarian forces marched on Vienna, the secondary capital of the German Empire.

As the war was fought not only on four fronts in Europe, but throughout the colonial empires in the Americas, Africa, Asia, and the Pacific, this was called the War of the Global Empires or the Imperial War. (Later the First Imperial War.)

At home the main fighting for the French was the northern front with the English who were allied with Holland and the southern front with Portugal. Sporadic fighting took place on the Italian frontier, but the Alps limited the fighting and Italy focused on fighting the Germans to the east.

It was a terrible war unlike any before as the new machine guns made the land combat become trench warfare that turned into a stalemate. At sea the fighting was in giant coal driven iron clad battleships and submarines. Meanwhile airships dropped bombs and, as the war continued, more and more machine gun armed Aeroplanes fought each other in dog fights as they escorted or attacked the fleet of bomber airships. This meant that cities behind the lines were bombed.

Millions of the French died in the war, an entire generation of young men decimated. As the stalemate turned from months into years in Europe, the battles in the colonial empires went back and forth. In 1917 Japan joined the French alliance and Russia now had a two front war. Then the Chinese Empire joined on the side of Russia and invaded Indochina.

But the worst part was the spread of disease. In late 1918 a new Influenza known as the Portugueese Flu, swept like a plague through the Continent. In January of 1920, without any end of the stalemate in Europe in sight and the colonial fortunes of the French alliance not going well, the King contracted the virus and died.

(15) Born in 1915, Henry VII came to the throne unexpectedly, as his father, the Dauphin, was a healthy man in his early 20s. However, due to the outbreak of the Flu, the Dauphin died a few days before King Gaston II.

Henry VII's reign is one of the shortest reigns in French history, if it can even be called that. It lasted for only one year. King Henry VII died in 1921 aged 6, after only about a month of "reigning" under a regency council headed by his uncle, the Duke of Anjou. He died due to the same influenza that took his father and grandfather.



(16) Guillaume, Duke of Anjou went from being third in line to the throne to the King of France in the space of six months as his father, brother and nephew died of the Portuguese Flu. He briefly acted as Regent for his infant nephews (incorrectly ascribed to being born in 1915 by several sources, rather than 1919) brief reign before becoming King aged only 18 himself. He depended greatly upon the experience of his mother, Dowager Queen Camilla, and his grandmother, Queen Vjera, to navigate his way through the closing days of the War, brought to an early finish by the pandemic. The line of succession had been decimated, the Soissons had inched closer - the senior most figure now sitting at twentieth in line to the throne.

So Guillaume set our to marry and soon, finding a match with Grand Duchess Marina of Russia, fourth daughter of Tsar Konstantin of Russia, in 1922. Marina was plain and boring but she produced several children, all of whom survived to adulthood.


The Duke of Aumale c. 1927

Marina died aged 49 in 1953, with children and grandchildren around her. Although they produced numerous issue, the marriage was practical and it was clear that Guillaume was affectionate to his distant cousin, the Duke of Aumale, from the line of the Duke of Chartres. When Marina died, Guillaume moved the Duke into the late Queens quarters adjoining his own at the Palais d'Leopold. This might have been scandalous only fifty years earlier, but the liberal attutude of the post-War generation brushed it aside - Who cared who the King contorted with.

The Duke of Aumale was present when the King passed away during an episode of their favourite television serial, Professeur Quoi (airing 1963 to 1989) and was given the honorary position in the funeral of a grieving spouse.

Guillaume was succeeded by the Dauphin Louis, his third child and first son.

1602531856390.png
(17) Prince Louis was born in 1930, the third child of the King and Queen, after his older sisters, the Princess Camila (b. 1925) and the Princess Jocelynn Marina ( b. 1927). His younger brother, Prince Gaston Frederick (b. 1934) was his only other sibling.

The major event of his childhood was the collapse of the economy in 1933, leading to a worldwide depression. Most of the Imperial nations survived through this diastrous time as their constitutional democracies responded to help the people. But the German Empire was different.

The Imperial War had ended without a formal treaty but a cessation of hostilities. The practical result of this was an independent Belgium as the British occupying forces set up a separate Republic, the loss of the Arab speaking Middle East and Egypt by the Ottomans to Britain and Portugual, who added them to their colonial empires, and the expansion of the German Empire as the only success of the German-French-Ottoman axis had been of the German Empire against Hungary and Russia. It now included eastern Europe north of the Carpathians all the way to Minsk, including the Baltics and Finland.

To France and the Ottomans the Imperial War was seen as a loss. But to the German Empire it was seen as a win. Any move toward a consitutional monarchy with a democratic government was jettisoned and the Empire became more autocratic and removed from the needs of the people. The depression hit the German Empire as bad as the rest of Europe, but the Imperial government took no steps to help the people, so it got worse. In 1935 the German Socialist Party led in a general revolution. This party had been heavily influenced by Russian expatriot socialists who been banished from Russia early in the 20th Century, especially Lenin, who developed the idea of a centralized party that controlled all. The result was that the German Empire became the Union of Socialist Republics of Europe, the USRE.

A cold war began and the friendship between Germany and France was over. Louis' cousin once removed, Wilhelm II, who'd become Kaiser in 1933, was forced off the throne and fled to Paris with his family, living in the palace with his relatives. Now a shifting off alliances happened as France allied with England and Russia, while Portugal had their own Revolution and ended up becoming another Socialist nation and allying with the USRE.

It wasn't until his father passed and he became King that the cold war turned into a hot one, the Second Imperial War made the first one seem quaint. The aeroplane had been developed in the previous fifty years from small biwing open cockpit flyers into giant single wing monsters with sometimes up to six props now on the wings and they could fly higher than the old airship and drop multitudes of bombs. The old trench warfare was supersceded by tank warfare and guerilla warfare. This was also a global war as the former colonies of the German Empire and Portugual were themselves now Socialist nations in alliance with the USRE and they mounted conventional warfare and guerilla wars to 'liberate' the nations of the colonial empires.

This war saw mass destruction to both France and Germany, both Paris and Berlin were in ruins from the bombings. By 1972 the formal aspects of war were over and it was guerilla war across northeastern France and the western part of the USRE, the same was true of the eastern republics of the USRE and western Russia. Louis and his court and the government had relocated to Marseilles after the destruction of Paris. The USRE government relocated to Vienna.

Meanwhile a French secret scientific project worked on a new kind of bomb based on scientific theories of the fission of the atom that had been only known in scientific circles for decades. The greatest scientists of the 'free' world gathered in Casablanca to work on this project and a bomb was finally developed in 1975 and dropped on Vienna.

The USRE was destroyed and the world was shocked by the power of one of these Fission Bombs that totally destroyed a city. Most of the Socialist former colonies of Germany and Portugal yield to the Empires, except for the Socialist Republic of Brazil. It was the regions of France and Britain in North America that financed the post war recovery, as they had not had war itself on their shores. By the late 1980s the rebuilding of Europe was basically complete and its new economy was thriving.

King Louis continued to keep his court in Marseilles while the actual government relocated to Paris shortly after the end of the war.

Louis reigned after the war in a new, vibrant France filled with wonders of technology that would have shocked him in his youth. Now at the ripe old age of 90 years old, the King is still vibrant and the Kingdom has forgotten the terrible war of the first years of his reign except in films that romanticize that period.


The House of Bourbon-Conde

Charles de Bourbon, Duke of Vendome, b. 1489, d. 1537
a) Antoine, King of Navarre, b. 1518, r. 1537 to 1562​
1) Henri III, King of Navarre, b. 1553, r. 1572 to 1589​
2) Catherine II, Queen of Navarre, b. 1559, r. 1589 to 1604​
b) Louis, Prince of Conde, b. 1530, d. 1569​
1) Henri I, Prince of Conde, b. 1552, d. 1588​
a) Henry IV of France, b. 1588, r. 1589 to 1646, m. Elizabeth Stuart (1596 to 1662)​
2) Francois, Prince of Conti, b. 1558, d. 1614​
3) Charles, Count of Soissons, b. 1566, d. 1612​
a) Louis, Count/Duke of Soissons, b. 1604, d. 1641​
1) line continues


Henry IV of France, b. 1588, r. 1589 to 1646, m. Elizabeth Stuart (1596 to 1662)
1) Henry, Dauphin of France, b. 1616, d. 1643​
a) Henry V of France, prev. Duke of Burgundy, b. 1640, r 1646 to 1655, then 1655 to 1678, m. Jeanne of Savoy (1645 to 1703)​
1) Jeanne of France, Madame Royale, b. 1664​
2) Francis III of France b. 1665, r. 1678 to 1722 m. 168, Anne of England (1665–1714)​
b) Jeanne b. 1685 D.1711, m. Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou​
c) Anne b. 1686​
g) Francis, Dauphin of France, b. 1689, d. 1705​
h) Maria b. 1690​
i) Pierre I of France, prev. Duke of Normandy, b. 1692, r. 1722 to 1747, m. 1710, Magdalena of Soissons (1690 to 1760)​
1) Pierre, Dauphin of France b.1712 d.1719​
2) Louis, Duke of Normandy b.1712 d.1719​
3) Charles, Dauphin of France b.1715 d.1731​
4) Jeanne of France b.1713 d.1762​
5) Isabeau of France b. 1714 d.1781​
3) Christine of France​
2) Rene I of France, prev. Duke of Vendome, b. 1618, r. 1655​
3) Francis, Duke of Orleans, b. 1621, Regent 1655 to 1658, then 1678 to 1683, d. 1705 m. Henrietta of England (1644–1670)​
a) Francis II, Duke of Orleans, b. 1665, d. 1723​
1) Jean Robert, Duke of Orleans, Premiere Prince Du Sang, b. 1690 d.1742​
4) Robert, Duke of Anjou b. 1624 d.1690, m. Marie-Alexandrine de Cröy​
a) Louis-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1650 d.1698, m. Karolina Wisnowiecki, Princess of Poland​
1) Louis-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1650 d.1698, m. Karolina Wisnowiecki, Princess of Poland​
a) Stanislas-Jean, Duke of Anjou b.1681 d.1740, m. Jeanne of France​
1) Phillipe VII, King of France (also Premiere Prince Du Sang 1742 to 1747) b. 1710, r. 1747 to 1764, m. Claudia of Savoy​
5) Charles, Duke of Berry b. 1625, d. 1687, m. Claire Clémence de Maillé (1628-1694)​
a) several generations
a) Gaston, 5th Duke of Berry, b. 1710, d. 1790, Premiere Prince du Sang 1760 to 1790, m. Yolande of Beja (1712 to 1772)​
1) Gaston b. 1735, d. 1755​
2) Isabeau of Berry, b. 1743, m. Jean III, King of France​
3) Antoine, 6th Duke of Berry, b. 1745, D.1810, Premiere Prince Du Sang 1790 to 1810​

Phillipe VII, King of France (also Premiere Prince Du Sang 1742 to 1747) b. 1710, r. 1747 to 1764, m. Claudia of Savoy
1l Phillipe, Dauphin of France, b. 1740, d. 1750​
2) Jean III, King of France, b. 1742, r. 1764 to 1800, m. Isabeau of Berry (1743 to 1810)​
a) Phillipe, Daupin of France, b.1762 d.1769​
b) Magdalene of France, b.1765​
c) Phillipotte of France, b.1767​
d) Sophia of France, b.1770​
e) Phillipe VIII, King of France, b.1772, r. 1800 to.1813, unmarried​
f) Gaston I, King of France, b.1775, regent 1800 to 1813, r.1813 to 1820, m. Princess Charlotte of the United Kingdom b.1781 d.1856​
1) Pierre II, King of France b. 1802, r.1820 to 1859, m. Princess Euphemia of the Netherlands b.1810 d.1871​
a) Pierre, Dauphin of France, b. 1830, d. 1858​
b) Guillaume I, King of France, prev. Duke of Orleans, b. 1835, r. 1859 to 1879, m Militzia of Montenegro​
1) Vjera of France & Montenegro, b. 1857​
c) Euphemia, Madame Royale, b. 1836, d. 1920, never married​
2) Carlo, Grand Duke of Tuscany b.1805 D.1872, m. Clementine d'Medici, Grand Duchess of Tuscany b.1802 D.1870​
a) line of Bourbon-Tuscany​
3) Henri, Duke of Anjou b.1807 D.1854, m. Teresa, Princess Wisnowiecki b.1810 D.1880​
a) Amèdèè, Duke of Anjou, b.1836 D.1870, never married.​
b) Lèopold I, King of France, previously Duke of Anjou, b. 1839 d.1897, m. Louise of Soissons b.1840 d.1906​
1) Henry VI, King of France, b. 1858, r. 1897 to 1913, m. Vjera of France and Montenegro (1857 to 1935)​
2) 4 other children​
4) Gaston, Duke of Normandy​
a) 4 sons, 6 grandsons​
5) Jean, Duke of Chartres, b. 1811​
a) Jean II, Duke of Chartres, b. 1840​
1) Gaston, Duke of Chartres, b. 1880​
a) Jean, Duke of Aumale, b. 1900​
3) Juliette of France, B.1743​
4) Charles, Duke of Orleans, b.1744 d.1750​
5) Claudia of France, b. 1745​
6) Caroline of France, b. 1745​
Lèopold I, King of France, previously Duke of Anjou, b. 1839 d.1897, m. Louise of Soissons b.1840 d.1906
1) Henry VI, King of France, b. 1858, r. 1897 to 1913, m. Vjera of France and Montenegro (1857 to 1935)​
a) Gaston II, King of France, b.1877, r. 1913-1920, m. Princess Camila Hohenzollern of Berlin (1883 to 1962)​
1) Unamed Dauphin, b. 1901, d. 1920​
a) Henry VII, King of France, b. 19(20), d. 1921​
2) Guillaume II, King of France, b. 1902, Regent 1920 to 1921, r. 1921 to 1970, m. Marina of Russia (1904 to 1953), (m?), Jean, Duke of Aumale, b. 1900, d. 19XX​
a) Princess Camila, b. 1925​
b) Prince Jocelynn Marina, b. 1927​
c) Louis XIII, King of France, b. 1930, r. 170 to present​
d) Gaston Frederick, b. 1934​
b) Princess Louisa, b. 1881, d. 1919, m. Kaiser Frederick II Hohenzollern (1875. r. 1905-1933)​
1) Kaiser Wilhem II Hohenzollern, b. 1905, r. 1933-1935)​
c) Lèopold b. 1886. d. 1895.​
2) 4 other children​


==================================================================================​

The Kings of Hispania

What if King Roderic of the Visigothic Kingdom centered in Toledo had defeated the attempted Moorish Invasion in 711 and a Kingdom of Hispania rooted in the Visigoths continued?

Roderic I "The Victorious," 710-738 (House of Cordoba) [1]

[1]
Roderick (b. 687) was the son of Duke Theodefred of Cordoba. He was elected to the kingship in 710 after the death of Wittiza, but only to the southern part of Hispania with Toledo as its capital, the rest of Hispania instead recognized Achilla the son of Wittiza. But Roderick fortunes changed tremendously when in 711, Tariq imb Ziyad, the Berber Muslim governor of Tangier escalated his previous raids on southern Hispania into an attemted invasion and conquest. At the battle of Gaudalete, Roderick was victorious, killed Tariq imb Ziyad in combat, and routed the Moors, who fled from Hispania.

Flush with his victory, Roderick went to war with Achilla and defeated him, reuniting all of Hispania. He married Achilla's sister, Ariberga, and banished Achilla from Hispania. He ruled in peace until his death, forging a peace treaty with the Moors of North Africa that encouraged mutual trade that led to increased prosperity.

(By the 8th Century the division between the Latinized Iberians and the ruling Germanic Visigoths had dissolved as the Visigoths had been latinized and finally adopted Catholicism, at which point Catholic Toledo became the capital. They thought of themselves as the kingdom of Hispania and their language was the Hispanic dialect of Latin. This also include what now is thought of as the South of France along the Mediterranean, then called Narbonensis.)

 

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What if Duarte, Duke of Guimarães didn't die?

Kings of Portugal and the Algarve;
Henrique I, r. 1578 to 1580
(House of Avis)
Duarte II, r. 1580 to 1598 (House of Avis) [1]
Manuel II, r. 1598 to 1640
(House of Crato) [2]



[1] With the Death of the Cardinal-King in 1580, the.successor was without a doubt; the Last Avis; Duarte, Duke of Guimarães. Born posthumously in 1541, Duarte had many men in front of him in the line of succession, but with the death of king Sebastian in 1578 left just the Cardinal-Infante and Duarte himself.

During his uncle's reign, the marriage between Duarte and Lady Mary Grey, a great-Grandchild of Henry VII of England, occurred. Rumours abounded that Elizabeth I of England suggested the marriage herself. The marriage was struck with the condition that Mary forfeit all claim for the English throne. The marriage was fruitful, with their first child, a Daughter, born in 1579 and a further five children over the next decade. While bringing some discontent due to her Protestantism, upon her arrival in Portugal, she did convert, and those upset were appeased.

The Portuguese Empire under Duarte II was said to be a merchants paradise,.with spices from India, Africa, and Brazil available in every Portuguese port. Duarte II would pass in 1598, and the throne would pass to the son of his legitimized cousin, Antonio of Crato.




(2) Despite Duarte, King of Portugal marrying and being given six children by his wife, Mary, only one child was male, and only 3 survived infancy. Even though his son, Duarte, had survived infancy, he died in 1595 aged 12, leaving Duarte with only two surviving children - his eldest Beatrice and his youngest Maria. As such, male succession would need to be traced back several generations - but instead, Duarte legitimized the until-then illegitimate line of Luis, Duke of Beja, starting with Antonio, Prior of Crato. Antonio died shortly after receiving news of his legitimisation, making his eldest son, Manuel, the heir of King Duarte.

Duarte invited Manuel to the royal palace and arranged for him to marry Beatrice of Portugal, then 16. By the time her father passed three years later, Beatrice would have provided her father with a son, and would provide several more sons.


In 1598, Manuel II was crowned, not of the House of Aviz as he was entitled, but as the first monarch of the House of Crato. In 1609, Manuels first major act was to offer the Moriscos who had been expelled from Spain safe harbour in Portugal. This lead to some friction between Spain and Portugal, leading to the brief Peninsula War from 1612 to 1618. In the end, Philip of Spain allowed Portugal to take onboard the Moriscos, rather more recognising the drain on the Spanish exchequer than the admission of Portugal being in the right.

With the influx of the Moriscos, who had also been given the option of settling in Tunisia and Morocco, to the Faro and Beja regions in the south of Portugal, created a distinct cultural variance between the north and south.

After the death of Beatrice of Portugal, he would marry the much younger Antwerpiana of Zweibrucken-Landsberg in 1635 when she was eighteen. Only a single daughter was born from this second marriage and it was from all accounts a happy marriage.

By the time of his death in 1640, Manuel was a grandfather and had taken to spending one month each year in the Faro region which lead to his increased popularity with the Moriscos and their descendants.

He was succeeded by ...... , his ......


Manuel, King of Portugal, b. 1469, r. 1495 to 1521
a) John III, King of Portugal, b. 1502, r. 1521 to 1557​
1) Joao Manuel, Prince of Portugal (1537 to 1554)​
a) Sebastian, King of Portugal, b. 1554, r. 1557 to 1578
b) Luis, Duke of Beja (1506 to 1555)​
1) Antonio, Prior of Crato, (1531 to 1595)​
a) Manuel II, King of Portugal, b. 1568, r. 1598 to 1640, m. (1) Beatrice of Portugal (1579 to 1629), m. (2) Antwerpiana of Zweibrucken-Landsberg (1617 to 1677)​
1a) Son, b. 1597​
1b) Several other sons​
2a) Antwerpiana Brabantia of Portugal, b. 1637​
c) Henry, King of Portugal, b. 1512, r. 1578 to 1580​
d) Duarte, Duke of Guimaraes (1515 to 1540)​
1) Duarte, King of Portugal, b. 1541, r. 1580 to 1598, m. (1578) Lady Mary Grey of England​
a) Beatrice of Portugal, (1579 to 1629), m. Manuel, King of Portugal​
1) see line of Manuel II
b) Isabel of Portugal, b. 1581, d. 1584​
c) Duarte, Prince of Portugal, b. 1583, d. 1595​
d) Catherine of Portugal, b. 1585, d. 1587​
e) Eleanor of Portugal, b. 1586, d. 1590​
f) Maria of Portugal, b 1588​
 
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