Maybe like a France-Germany or Japan-South Korea situation? Nominally and in all aspects allies but suspicion by the populace?

That describes things rn, but not in the future. Germany and America are tied by trade, ambitions that have pissed off the same people, and by a German population in America. They're very different countries. America is a fairly multiracial democracy with liberal institutions. Germany is a conservative constitutional monarchy that has recently invested more power in the person of the Kaiser and is suspicious of most other races.

In terms of an alliance like France-Germany, I do have an alliance in mind, but it would spoil things
 
So, here's how I envision relations shaking out:

The Germans and Americans don't have a special relationship a la the US-UK because there are fewer ties that bind, they've only fought one war together, and Liberia is going to become a huge sticking point in the post war world. However, their rivalry will also be much more gentlemanly than the US-USSR rivalry of OTL. I think the closest analog to the US-UK Special Relationship you're going to see is going to be between the US and China. China will be very heavily American influenced.

German culture has influenced the US, I just need to delve into specifics. Off the top of my head, there are probably more German loan words in American slang, German cuisine is more popular, and there's probably been some more German influence on education than OTL
I assume you aren't from the Midwest or one of the Great Lakes states. The German influence in the middle of America is very heavy, and if it hadn't been for the World Wars, in particular the First, it would even be more pronounced (a little play on words there since one of the anti-German reactions during the war was to change the pronunciation of Berlin and drop German from school curriculums). If the US and germany had fought on the same side in two wars you better believe there would be a much stronger bond, and a much more anti-English and French reaction.
 
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I assume you aren't from the Midwest or one of the Great Lakes states. The German influence in the middle of America is very heavy, and if it hadn't been for the World Wars, in particular the First, it would even be more pronounced (a little play on words there since one of the anti-German reactions during the war was to change the pronunciation of Berlin and drop German from school curriculums). If the US and germany had fought on the same side in two wars you better believe there would be a much stronger bond, and a much more anti-English and French reaction.

You are correct, I'm a Southerner. However, they only fought together in one war ITTL. America was involved in Mexico during TTL's WWI. By the time of WWII ITTL, most Germans have been in America for a generation at least. I envision TTL's German-Americans as being like OTL Cajuns. They're proud of their heritage and it provides a unique regional stamp, but you're not going to see them shilling on the Old Country's behalf when they come into conflict with America's interests. However, I still think that as far as geopolitical rivalries go, America and Germany's will still be fairly polite, probably moreso than any IOTL.

You're correct that anti-French and English sentiment are powerful forces.

EDIT: Another thing to consider regarding the war is this: it's more separate than OTL. There are actually very few fronts where Americans and Germans are fighting alongside each other in any appreciable numbers. They're more co-belligerents under the same umbrella than anything.
 
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Forward to Jakarta!
Forward to Jakarta!

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Admiral Nimitz and General Eisenhower enjoy mint juleps at the Allied Indonesia Command HQ in Jakarta (June 21st, 1942)
The Joint Chiefs of Staff had three primary targets in the Pacific War. The first of these targets was Indonesia. Specifically, New Guinea, Sulawesi, and Java were targeted for a formal American military presence, while the rest of the region was to be disrupted via the use of friendly resistance fighters and airstrikes. This was done to ensure that Japan was cut off from Allied Australia and New Zealand, and to further disrupt the Allies' delicate oil supply. Securing the Java Sea would also allow for operations to begin to liberate the Philippines, currently groaning under a truly barbaric Japanese occupation. With Canada suppressed, the Americans could finally turn their wrath on the Japanese empire. General Douglas MacArthur famously said "By the time this is done, the Japanese will wish they'd never left Honshu."

The United States Navy had built up a powerful attack force of 36 aircraft carriers and several hundred battleships, cruisers, submarines, and support ships at Wake Island by March of 1941. Accompanying them were about 55,000 Soldiers and Marines. With fighting winding down in Canada, Fleet Admiral Nimitz and Army Supreme Commander General Dwight D. Eisenhower decided now was the time to go on the offensive in the Pacific. On March 27th, the USN swept a powerful Japanese fleet from the seas near Guam, crippling the entire IJN. The reclamation of Guam on April 10th was a shot in the arm to American forces in the Pacific, and to oppressed Hong Kongers and Filipinos, both of whom staged large revolts that legitimately shook their occupiers. Having reclaimed Guam, the Pacific Attack Force (as it was being called) proceeded to hammer Anglo-Australian forces in northern New Guinea from April 13th through the 20th. Most notably, 9 aircraft carriers pounded the island with millions of pounds of white phosphorus, devastating mines, farms, towns, bases, bunkers, and even a few unfortunate villages caught in the crossfire. On April 22nd the United States Marines seized several ports in New Guinea, and began moving inland. The United States didn't devote huge amounts of resources to seizing the island outright, as denying it to the enemy was sufficient. Most American military action on the island ceased by August, with the majority of New Guinea under American occupation. Having captured New Guinea, the Americans prepared to attack Indonesia proper.

In September and on into October, a series of heated naval battles wore down the Royal Navy, the IJN, and the Australian Navy, as the Americans seemed to have an endless supply of ships and men to throw into the fray. On November 11th, the Americans broke into Sulawesi, and were greeted by the Indonesians as liberators. However, local collaborators and Australian-Japanese forces remained ensconced well into February of 1942. It was an excellent development for the Americans, who could now launch long-range bomber attacks on Singapore, British Malaya, and Japanese forces in Indochina. This significantly disrupted logistics to the Raj, and the inability of the British to deploy reinforcements would be a key factor in its collapse a few years later. The Americans also found an additional source of manpower more familiar with Japanese tactics, as some 10,000 resistance fighters joined the American Sulawesi Auxiliary Force. Having secured Sulawesi, the long slog to Java could begin in force.

Java was the jewel of the entire region, heavily populated and possessing Jakarta, a vital city for all kinds of raw material processing and manufacturing. Almost immediately after Sulawesi was secured, the USN and USMC moved in on the Jewel of the East Indies. Resistance was fierce. The Royal Navy and Australians threw everything they feasibly could at the Yankees, as did New Zealand. The IJN had already cut their losses as they knew that the Americans had other targets closer to home. The IJN breaking would speed the American assault. It was fairly easy to sweep what was left of the Royal Navy Malaya Squadron and the Australian Navy from the region. Seizing Java, and especially Jakarta, was a different matter due to the sheer number of troops on the island. The USN blockaded the island and spent a great deal of time bombarding it. To try and prevent the island's population from getting too angry with them, and to minimize civilian casualties, local collaborators wrote pamphlets in native languages warning people of imminent bombings. This was at least somewhat effective, but casualties were still high. It took several months, but in late May the defenders, running out of food and ammo, and increasingly unable to deal with American bombardment, started to crack. A contingent of 30,000 Marines landed on June 1st and the native Javans, themselves suffering, blew up into open rebellion. Legends say that half of the Jakartan garrison had already been hanged by the people when the Americans came into the city. This hasn't been confirmed, but it is true that with a population openly revolting against them, most of the Anglo-Aussie-Japanese occupiers either surrendered or died.

Having won control of these key islands, Eisenhower, Nimitz, and Douglas MacArthur plotted their next steps from the former base of Allied Command in the region. Nimitz called for two submarine squadrons to be based in Jakarta, which could effectively cut off Australia and New Zealand from the rest of the GIA. Long range bombers would also be based in New Guinea and Java to hit New Zealand and Australia. Throughout 1942, American strategic bombing plastered northern Australia, with Darwin being especially hard hit. However, Australia and New Zealand wouldn't really feel the heat until March of 1943, when the first 100 V-56 Bombers were delivered to New Guinea. Now, the US could hit Alice Springs, Sydney, Melbourne, Auckland, and Canberra could all be hit from American bases in Java and New Guinea. By June 1943, an additional 300 V-56 Bombers were delivered, and bombing intensified further. All the while, American submarines crippled shipping with impunity, practically being able to hunt cargo ships for sport as the Royal Navy was engaged elsewhere. Even if American strategic bombing couldn't obliterate industrial capacity in the Oceanic Twins, it could cripple it while making life miserable. At the same time, American submarines shut down whole sectors of the economy, causing shortages of everything from tires to pantyhose. All the while, unfounded paranoia was building that the Yankees were going to "Pull a Canada" on the region. The final straw came on August 1st, 1943, when a convoy carrying 3,000 fresh recruits from the two Dominions got sunk with impunity by the Americans. London's response was to demand more men but also to refuse to commit more assets to the region. Australia and New Zealand decided to surrender. The public was angry, terrified, the economy had basically ground to a halt, and now it was perfectly clear that London had abandoned them except for when they could be useful. The US Navy steamed into Sydney, Darwin, and Auckland while Washington debated what exactly to do with the region after the war.

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V-56 Bombers under construction in California (1943)

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The USS Santo Domingo steaming towards Java (1942)

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Asian-American troops on the march in New Guinea (1941)
 
Debating if it would be too wankish to have the US annex New Zealand. On the one hand, it's tiny and has a population under 2 million people who are fairly similar culturally speaking. On the other hand, the US is absorbing some 8 million people in Canada and NZ is fairly far flung. Let me know your thoughts!

We have about 4-5 chapters left in the war, and then we're going to cover the post-war world! I've got some real whoppers cooked up.
 
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Possible? Cause they have a similar language, race, and governments are also similar enough that they can merge with some changes. But there's post-war sentiment and resentment towards those that kill their men. I think it's a possibility, but it depends on what everybody else says.
 
Debating if it would be too wankish to have the US annex New Zealand. On the one hand, it's tiny and has a population under 2 million people who are fairly similar culturally speaking. On the other hand, the US is absorbing some 8 million people in Canada and NZ is fairly far flung. Let me know your thoughts!

We have about 4-5 chapters left in the war, and then we're going to cover the post-war world! I've got some real whoppers cooked up.

I would take New Zealand & Turn Australia into an Autonomous US Territory in a Trade & Customs Union.
So Australia’s Foreign Relations & Defense will be controlled by Washington, Trade will be conducted with the US Dollar, and Australia will be allowed to send observers to the US Congress to represent them but not vote, residents of the Australian territories will be able to vote in local elections but not Congressional or Presidential elections.
Statehood to be granted after 20-40 years and after 2/3rds swear an Ironclad Oath of Allegiance.
 
I would take New Zealand & Turn Australia into an Autonomous US Territory in a Trade & Customs Union.
So Australia’s Foreign Relations & Defense will be controlled by Washington, Trade will be conducted with the US Dollar, and Australia will be allowed to send observers to the US Congress to represent them but not vote, residents of the Australian territories will be able to vote in local elections but not Congressional or Presidential elections.
Statehood to be granted after 20-40 years and after 2/3rds swear an Ironclad Oath of Allegiance.

I think annexing Australia or turning it into a territory would be a bridge too far. However, maybe a protectorate along the lines of OTL (and TTL) Japan? Military capabilities are limited and there's a heavy American influence on foreign policy and government.
 
I think annexing Australia or turning it into a territory would be a bridge too far. However, maybe a protectorate along the lines of OTL (and TTL) Japan? Military capabilities are limited and there's a heavy American influence on foreign policy and government.
That and certain members of the pre-war military and civilian government are prohibited from serving in office. Those people that ordered or committed war crimes are tried.
 
I think annexing Australia or turning it into a territory would be a bridge too far. However, maybe a protectorate along the lines of OTL (and TTL) Japan? Military capabilities are limited and there's a heavy American influence on foreign policy and government.
America would probably want to keep a close eye on them, just to make sure the Aussies don't get up to anything.
 
Yeah, doing what America did OTL to Japan is probably the most realistic option. Actual annexation may happen, but only to small islands out in the wider pacific that Australia or NZ used to use for radar stations or something.
 
Ok folks, update on Aussies and NZ.

Australia will be an American ally a la West Germany. Militarized, but subordinate. New Zealand will basically be put in the same position as OTL Cuba during the Platt Amendment years.
 
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